Mar 25, 2019  
2014-2015 University Catalog 
    
2014-2015 University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Student Conduct



While freedom of thought and expression is the lifeblood of our academic community, the maintenance of civility is a precondition to the vigorous exchange of ideas, and it is the policy of the University to promote civility in all forms of expression and conduct. The University thus believes that any expression or act of intolerance or discrimination - whether based on race, gender, religion, color, age, national origin, disability, status as a Vietnam-era veteran, or on any other basis - is repugnant and inimical to our most basic values.

Students are responsible for observing the policies, rules, and regulations of Purdue University.

These, in general, state the expectation that Purdue students will at all times conduct themselves as responsible citizens. Failure to show respect for duly established civil laws or University regulations will be handled by the Office of the Dean of Students in conformance with the various policies and regulations hereafter stated. The Student Honor Code and the Bill of Student Rights are documents initiated by the students themselves and approved by the faculty and the Board of Trustees for the purpose of indicating both the rights and the responsibilities of students. In the interest of specificity in regulations, the resolution of the Board of Trustees states in detail the kind of serious misconduct for which students are subject to suspension or expulsion from the University and the methods of appealing disciplinary decisions.

This section is followed by other miscellaneous regulations concerning the conduct of students. It is imperative that students become thoroughly familiar with this part of Student Regulations in order to avoid jeopardizing their relationships with the University and to understand fully their responsibility as citizens and members of the University community.


Purdue University Bill of Student Rights

(West Lafayette Campus)

(From Vice President and Treasurer Memo A-16. Board of Trustees, April 30, 1970. Revised by the January 9, 1975, July 10, May 31, 1997.)

Preamble

At an institution of higher learning, the pursuit of knowledge and the attainment of mature attitudes will be greatly facilitated by freedom of expression and decision making as enumerated in the following Bill of Rights. In exercising these rights, however, students must bear the responsibility to act in accordance with local, state, and national laws, and University rules. No right specified by this bill is meant to be construed as enabling students to infringe upon the individual rights of another member of the academic community. We, the students, thereby endorse the Purdue Honor Code and the following Bill of Rights, expecting in all instances to accept these documents with maturity and a level of responsibility that enables the University to retain its academic excellence and to foster an atmosphere conducive to thoughtful and productive individual and collaborative inquiry.

Article 1

The student has the right to accurately and plainly stated information that enables the student to understand clearly:

  1. The general qualifications for establishing and maintaining acceptable academic standing within a particular major and at all other levels within the University.
  2. The graduation requirements for the student’s specific curriculum and major.
  3. The course objectives, requirements, and grading policies set by individual instructors for their courses.

Article 2

Changes in graduation requirements that would delay completion of a student’s program or impose a hardship on the student shall not be applied retroactively. This article shall not apply to professional certification or other requirements imposed from outside the University.

Article 3

A student’s education record or other personally identifiable information except directory information shall not be disseminated outside the University without the student’s consent, except under legal compulsion. Within the University, the use of the student’s education records or other personally identifiable information shall be limited to providing student services. Disciplinary records of a student other than those required to support encumbrances of the academic transcript and/or registration shall be destroyed within five years after the student’s separation from the University.

Article 4

The student shall be free to discuss and express any view relevant to subject matter presented by the instructor or other class members. However, in exercising this freedom, the student shall not interfere with the academic process of the class by speaking to or behaving towards others in a hostile, demeaning, or intimidating manner.

Article 5

The student’s course grade shall be based upon academic performance, and not upon opinions or conduct in matters unrelated to academic standards. The students have the right to discuss and review their academic performance with their instructors. Any student who feels that any course grade has been based upon something other than academic performance has the right to appeal through the University Grade Appeals system.

Article 6

Within the limitations generally accepted for proprietary and collaborative work, and those imposed by the relevant standards of academic honesty, the student has the right to freedom of inquiry, to exchange findings and recommendations, and consistent with applicable University regulations, to publish. No publication by a student shall imply University endorsement.

Article 7

A student, student group, or student organization has the right to distribute written or electronic material on campus without prior approval, providing such distribution is consistent with appropriate regulations concerning the time, place, and manner of distribution and does not interfere with University activities. The student press shall be free of censorship or pressure aimed at controlling editorial policy or staff appointments or removals. The editors and managers shall not be arbitrarily suspended because of student, faculty, administrative, alumni, or community disapproval of editorial policy or content. The same freedom shall be assured oral statements or views on an institution-controlled and student-operated radio or television station. Such editorial freedom entails a corollary obligation under the canons of responsible journalism, applicable regulations of the Federal Communications Commission, and their station constitution or activity guidelines. All student communications shall explicitly state on the editorial page or in broadcast that the opinions expressed are not necessarily those of the University or of the student body.

Article 8

The student has the right to freedom from unlawful discrimination on the basis of race, gender, religion, color, age, national origin or ancestry, disability, marital status, parental status, sexual orientation, or status as a military veteran. A perceived violation of these principles shall be the basis for a grievance procedure with the Campus Appeals Board.

Article 9

Students should have clearly defined means to participate in the formation of University policy affecting academic and student affairs. Student representation on University committees shall be provided wherever appropriate as a mode of student participation. In any case, University committees, when appropriate, should schedule and announce hearings at which representatives of the Purdue Student Government, Purdue Graduate Student Government, student organizations, and individual students as well, can present oral or written statements as effective to the committee deliberations.

Article 10

Students living in University-operated housing shall have the right to share equally in the establishment, modification, and enforcement of residential rules and regulations. Such right shall be exercised through their residential student organizations in cooperation with appropriate University administration. The landlord-tenant rights and responsibilities of both parties shall be recognized as shall all law bearing on such relationships. A perceived violation of this right shall be the basis for a grievance procedure with the Campus Appeals Board.

Article 11

The student has the right to freedom from illegal search and seizure. No contractual arrangement with the University shall be interpreted as waiving this right.

Article 12

Any group of students may become a recognized Purdue student organization by registration with the University in accordance with the provision of University regulations. Any appeal of a University decision to discontinue or refuse recognition of a student group shall be made through the Campus Appeals Board.

Article 13

Any student group recognized as a Purdue student organization shall be entitled to the use of available University facilities in conformity with regulations. Recognition shall not imply University endorsement of group goals and activities.

Article 14

Any recognized Purdue student organization or any group of students that is able to secure sponsorship by a recognized student organization and that is able to demonstrate financial responsibility has the right to present speakers of its choice to address members of the University community using appropriate University facilities. These assemblies shall be subject to regulations necessary to prevent space and time conflicts and to protect the operations of the University and the safety of persons or property.

Article 15

Freedom of assembly shall be guaranteed to all members of the University community. Such assemblies shall be consistent with University regulations regarding the time, place, and conduct of such assemblies.

Article 16

Every student and recognized student organization has the right to substantive and procedural fair play in the administration of discipline and the imposition of academic sanctions. This requires that in all situations the student be informed of the nature of the charges, that the student be given an opportunity to refute them, and that the institution not be arbitrary in its actions.

Article 17

The student who violates civil law may incur penalties prescribed by civil authorities. Only where the University’s interests as an academic community are distinct from those of the general community should the special authority of the University be asserted.

Article 18

It is the right of every student to exercise freely full rights as a citizen. Any student may participate in off-campus activities singly or with any group provided that no claim is made that the student represents the University.

Article 19

This Bill of Student Rights is a reaffirmation by the entire University community that the constitutional guarantees and the basic principles of fair treatment and respect for the integrity, judgment, and contribution of the individual student, coinciding with each student’s freedom to learn set forth in the foregoing articles, are essential to the proper operation of an institution of higher learning. Accordingly, in the interpretation and enforcement of the policies, rules, and regulations of Purdue University, these student rights shall be preserved and given effect, but they shall not be construed or applied so as to limit the rights guaranteed students under the Constitution of the United States or the Constitution of the state of Indiana. Whenever a student or a group of students claims that these rights have been violated and that the student or group of students has been or will be adversely affected thereby, and such complaint is not resolved informally by the interested parties, it may be presented to an appropriate body of the campus appeals system. Through this system, an appropriate board or committee shall have the power and duty to hear the interested parties and to make findings on complaints within its jurisdiction. In case of grade appeals, the University Grade Appeals Committees shall have final authority. In all other cases, the Campus Appeals Board shall submit recommendations to the president of the University; provided that all such claims that arise out of or are connected with alleged misconduct for which disciplinary proceedings have been instituted shall be presented and determined in such proceedings. If necessary the president may present such recommendations to the Board of Trustees for its consideration.

Article 20

The enumeration of this bill of certain rights shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the student. Nothing contained in this bill shall be construed as any denial or limitation upon the legal authority or responsibility of the Board of Trustees to establish policies and to make rules and regulations governing the operation of Purdue University.

Article 21

Proposed amendments of this Bill of Student Rights may be initiated by the Purdue Student Government, Purdue Graduate Student Government, University Senate, administrative officials, or the Board of Trustees and shall be submitted to the Purdue Student Government and University Senate for consideration and recommendation before adoption by the Board of Trustees. In the event the Board of Trustees adopts an amendment not approved by the Purdue Student Government, Purdue Graduate Student Government, and University Senate, then the Purdue Student Government or University Senate may withdraw its endorsement of the bill in whole or in part.


Purdue University Code of Honor

(From Vice President and Treasurer Memo A-16. Board of Trustees, April 30, 1970. Revised by the January 9, 1975, July 10, May 31, 1997.)

The purpose of the Purdue University academic community is to discover and disseminate truth. In order to achieve these goals, the university commits itself towards maintaining a culture of academic integrity and honesty. For this to be possible, self-discipline and a strong desire to benefit others must be present within each individual. Therefore, we students must follow the Regulations Governing Student Conduct of Purdue University out of a sense of mutual respect, rather than out of fear of the consequences of their violation.


Regulations Governing Student Conduct, Disciplinary Proceedings, and Appeals

(From Vice President and Treasurer Memo A-16. Board of Trustees, April 30, 1970, with revisions dated January 9 and July 10, 1975, May 31, 1997, April 2, 1999, April 9, 2010 and May 10, 2013.)

  1. Authority, Application, Amendments
    1. Authority. These regulations are enacted pursuant to the power and authority conferred by the laws of the state of Indiana upon the Trustees of Purdue University, including without limitation, the power to do all acts necessary and expedient to put and keep Purdue University in operation, and to make all bylaws, rules, and regulations required or proper to conduct and manage the University, as provided in Indiana Code 21-27-7-4 and 21-27-7-5, and the power and duty to do all acts and things mandated or provided for in Indiana Code 2139-2-2, 21-39-2-3, 21-39-2-4, and 21-39-2-5.
    2. Application.These regulations, as from time to time amended, shall apply to all undergraduate and graduate students of Purdue University at the West Lafayette Campus and each regional campus and shall be deemed a part of the terms and conditions of the admission and enrollment of all students. In case of any conflict or inconsistencies with any other rules, regulations, directives, or policies now existing, these regulations shall govern. They shall be enforced by the President.
    3. Amendments.These regulations, and any amendments hereto, shall take effect on a date prescribed by the Board of Trustees and shall remain in effect until rescinded or modified by the President. Amendments may be proposed at any time by the Purdue Student Government, Purdue Graduate Student Government, University Senate, administrative staff, or by the Board of Trustees.
    4. Adaptation for Regional Campuses.The Chancellors are hereby authorized and directed to make and promulgate revisions of these regulations, as applied to the regional campuses, which are necessary because of the different student or faculty organizations or governments existing at the regional campuses. Such revisions shall be effective when approved by the President.
    5. Definitions:
      1. Advisor means any person selected by a student to assist him/her in disciplinary proceedings. A student has the right to be assisted by an advisor but the advisor is not permitted to speak or participate directly in any other manner during any hearing, nor may he/she appear in lieu of the student. Students are responsible for representing themselves. If a student is involved in civil or criminal proceedings arising out of the same circumstances, the student is allowed to have an attorney serve as his/her advisor, at his/her own expense, with the understanding that the attorney’s role is as an advisor rather than as an advocate.
      2. Chancellor means the chief executive officer of the regional campuses at Calumet, Fort Wayne, and North Central.
      3. Complainant means any person filing a complaint of suspected misconduct.
      4. Dean of Students/Dean’s Office means the dean of students or another person authorized to act for him/her.
      5. Degree Revocation means rescinding a degree previously awarded by the University. In cases where a degree revocation sanction has been issued, it will be noted on the student’s academic transcript on a permanent basis.
      6. Disciplinary probation means a probationary student status imposed for a limited time as a result of an official determination of conduct. In the event the student is found in violation (under the procedures set forth in these regulations) of subsequent charges of conduct, records of such disciplinary probations shall be taken into consideration in determining the disciplinary sanction, if any, to be imposed or the informal action, if any, to be taken because of such subsequent conduct.
      7. Disciplinary sanction/decision means expulsion, suspension, probated suspension, disciplinary probation, and/or educational sanctions.
      8. Educational sanctions means providing learning opportunities for students who violate the University’s regulations and require them to participate in reasonable and relevant educational activities that foster their personal, ethical and social development. Educational sanctions may be proposed in combination with other disciplinary actions.
      9. Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost (EVPAA/Provost) is the chief academic affairs officer or another person authorized to act for him/her.
      10. Expulsion means permanent termination of student status, generally without grades; however, in cases such as academic dishonesty, a directed grade for a particular course may be appropriate.
      11. Informal action means educating students about the behavioral standards expected of them as members of the University community and holds them accountable for inappropriate conduct. The issuance of an oral or written warning, admonition, reprimand, educational sanction and/or use of counseling procedures may result if it is alleged that a student has engaged in inappropriate behavior.
      12. Obstruction or disruption of a University activity means any unlawful or objectionable acts or conduct (1) that seriously threaten the ability of the University to maintain its facilities available for performance of its educational activities, or (2) that are in violation of the reasonable rules and standards of the University designed to protect the academic community from unlawful conduct, or (3) that present a serious threat to person or property of the academic community. Such phrase shall include, without limitation of the foregoing general definition, the unlawful use of force or violence on or within any buildings or grounds owned, used, occupied, or controlled by the University; using or occupying any such buildings or grounds in violation of lawful rules or regulations of the University, or for the purpose or with the effect of denying or interfering with the lawful use thereof by others; and injuring or harming any person or damaging or destroying the property of the University or the property of others, within such buildings and grounds.
      13. Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities (OSRR) is an administrative unit of the Office of the Dean of Students (ODOS) responsible for promoting student responsibility and encouraging honesty, integrity, and respect among Purdue students through education, compliance with behavioral standards, and support of individual rights.
      14. President means the chief executive officer of the University.
      15. Probated suspension means conditional continuation of student status for a limited and defined period of time. The student is permitted to retain student status upon the condition that the student does not further violate any subsection of Section III-B-2 that would normally result in a disciplinary sanction/decision during the time probated suspension is in effect. If, during the period of probated suspension, the student is found responsible for an additional violation of Section III-B-2 after a hearing, suspension may become immediately effective and may be extended for a longer period of time than the period of probated suspension originally assigned.
      16. Suspension means termination of student status for a limited time, generally without grades; however, in cases such as academic dishonesty, a directed grade for a particular course may be appropriate.
      17. University activity is any teaching, research, service, administrative, or other function, proceeding, ceremony, program, or activity conducted by or under the authority of the University, or with which the University has any official connection, whether taking place on or off campus, including without limitation University cooperative education programs, internships, practicum, field experiences, and athletic or other intercollegiate activities.
      18. University business day means a day when the University is open for normal business, regardless of whether classes are in session (e.g., the day preceding Thanksgiving).
      19. University property means property owned, controlled, used, or occupied by the University.
      20. Vice President for Student Affairs (VPSA) is the chief student affairs officer or another person authorized to act for him/her.
  2. Student Conduct
    1. General. Students are expected and required to abide by the laws of the state of Indiana and of the United States and the rules and regulations of Purdue University, to conduct themselves in accordance with accepted standards of social behavior, to respect the rights of others, and to refrain from any conduct that tends to obstruct the work of the University or to be injurious to the welfare of the University. A student who violates these general standards of conduct may be subject to informal actions (as defined in Section III-A-5). If the violation falls within one of the categories of conduct listed in Section III-B-2, the student may also be subject to disciplinary sanctions. No disciplinary sanction/decision may be imposed except for conduct covered by one of the categories listed in Section III-B-2.
    2. Conduct Subject to Disciplinary Sanctions. The following actions constitute conduct for which students may be subject to informal action or disciplinary sanctions.
      1. Dishonesty in connection with any University activity. Cheating, plagiarism, or knowingly furnishing false information to the University are examples of dishonesty. The commitment of the acts of cheating, lying, stealing, and deceit in any of their diverse forms (such as the use of ghost-written papers, the use of substitutes for taking examinations, the use of illegal cribs, plagiarism, and copying during examinations) is dishonest and must not be tolerated. Moreover, knowingly to aid and abet, directly or indirectly, other parties in committing dishonest acts is in itself dishonest. (University Senate Document 72-18, December 15, 1972).
      2. Forgery, alteration, or the unauthorized use of University documents, records, or identification.
      3. Obstruction or disruption of any University activity (as defined in Section III-A-5) or inciting, aiding, or encouraging other persons to engage in such conduct. If substantial obstruction or disruption is threatened or occurs, the President, or his/her designee, may issue a disciplinary suspension warning. The minimum disciplinary sanction for violation of this subsection during the period of such warning shall be suspension for the remainder of the semester (or summer session) during which the offense occurred and for the next full academic semester and any intervening summer session thereafter. However, a more severe disciplinary sanction may be imposed.
      4. Physical abuse of any person or conduct that threatens or endangers the health or safety of any other person, whether or not such conduct occurs on University property.
      5. Theft or attempted theft of, or the unauthorized use or possession of, or the unauthorized exertion of control over, or causing damage to property of any kind belonging to the University, a member of the University community, a campus visitor, or a person or agency participating in a University activity.
      6. Unauthorized entry or access to, or unauthorized use or occupancy of, any University property including without limitation lands, buildings, structures, telecommunications, computer or data processing equipment, programs, systems, or software, or other facilities or services connected with a University activity.
      7. Violation of any University rule governing student organizations, or the use of University property (including the time, place, and manner of meetings or demonstrations on University property), or of any other University rule that is reasonably related to the orderly operation of the University; provided, however, that no disciplinary sanction shall be imposed in any such case unless it is shown that the accused student knew, or, in the exercise of reasonable care, should have known, of the rule in question.
      8. Use, possession, or distribution of narcotics or dangerous drugs, except as expressly permitted by law.
      9. Lewd, indecent, or obscene conduct or expression on University property or in connection with a University activity.
      10. Failure to comply with directions of University officials acting in the performance of their duties.
      11. Any conduct that substantially threatens or interferes with the maintenance of appropriate order and discipline in the operation of the University, or any conduct on University property or in connection with a University activity that invades the rights of others.
      12. Violation of the University Antiharassment Policy (see Part 4, Section II).
      13. The possession or use of alcoholic beverages in or on any University property, unless expressly permitted by University regulations (University Senate Document 99-9, April 24, 2000).
      14. The possession, use, or distribution of any explosives, guns, or other deadly or dangerous weapons reasonably calculated to cause bodily injury on University property or in connection with a University activity unless specifically authorized by the University (University Senate Document 99-10, April 24, 2000).
    3. Demonstrations. Any individual or group activity or conduct, apparently intended to call attention to the participants’ point of view on some issues, is not of itself misconduct. Demonstrations that do not involve conduct beyond the scope of constitutionally protected rights of free speech and assembly are, of course, permissible. However, conduct that is otherwise improper cannot be justified merely because it occurs in the context of a demonstration. Demonstrations that involve violations of any subsection of Section III-B-2 will not be permitted. A student will be charged with misconduct for any individual misconduct committed by the student in the course of a demonstration.
    4. Status During Suspension or Expulsion. No diploma shall be given and no grades other than directed grades, academic credit, or degree shall be awarded any student who has been expelled or suspended from the University so long as the expulsion or suspension is in effect.
    5. Status During Disciplinary Proceedings. Except where summary action is taken as provided in Section III-C-7, the status of a student charged with misconduct shall not be affected pending the final disposition of charges, provided, however, that no diploma shall be given and no grades, academic credit, or degree shall be awarded to a student against whom charges are pending for which a disciplinary sanction may be imposed. The effective date of any disciplinary sanction shall be a date established by the final adjudicating authority.
    6. Conduct Subject to Other Penalties. As provided by Indiana Code 21-39-2-5, conduct that constitutes a violation of these rules and regulations may be sanctioned after determination of responsibility by the procedures herein provided without regard to whether such conduct also constitutes an offense under the criminal laws of any state or of the United States or whether such conduct might result in civil liability of the violator to other persons.
  3. Procedures in Student Conduct Cases
    1. Any individual from inside or outside the University community may file a complaint against a student suspected of violating University Regulations. The complaint shall be in writing, dated and signed by the complainant and directed to the Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities. Complaints should be submitted as soon as possible after the event takes place, preferably no later than during the semester in which the event happened. Upon receipt of an alleged violation the student conduct officer will review the evidence to determine if charges are warranted and whether the allegations contained in the report if substantiated would constitute a violation of University Regulations.
      1. No Violation of University Regulations. Upon reviewing a complaint of suspected misconduct, the student conduct officer may determine there has been no violation of University Regulations, and no further action will be taken on the report.
      2. Possible Violation of University Regulations. If the student conduct officer determines that the complaint of suspected misconduct if substantiated would constitute a violation of University Regulations, he/she may initiate Informal Action or Disciplinary Action Proceedings.
    2. Disciplinary and Informal Action Proceedings, General. The procedures hereby established shall be followed in all cases in which the University institutes disciplinary or informal action proceedings against students for violations of the rules of student conduct set forth in Part V, Section III-B. These procedures shall not affect additional jurisdiction or procedures established by recognized student organizations or agencies/offices authorized to act on behalf of the University (e.g., University Residences, Recreational Sports, Student Activities and Organizations, Intercollegiate Athletics, etc).
      1. Pre-Hearing Interview. Students have the option of scheduling a pre-hearing interview with a representative of the Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities (OSRR) either before or after they receive a notice of charges. In a pre-hearing interview a representative will meet with the student informally to explain the discipline process and answer questions about the procedures and possible consequences.
      2. Disciplinary Proceedings. Disciplinary proceedings are those proceedings initiated by the issuance of a written notice of charges and are governed by the provisions of Section III-C-1 to 7. The term disciplinary proceedings does not include informal action proceedings.
      3. Informal Action Proceedings. Investigated by the dean’s office with a view to possible informal action. Informal action proceedings are informal investigations conducted and documented by the OSRR. Informal action may be taken by the OSRR without instituting disciplinary proceedings and such action shall be final and not subject to further hearing or appeal. A disciplinary sanction/decision may not be imposed under informal action proceedings.
    3. Institution of Disciplinary Proceedings
      1. Disciplinary proceedings shall be instituted by the OSRR by the issuance of a written notice of charges.
      2. The notice of charges (and all other written notices given to students against whom disciplinary proceedings are initiated) shall be delivered by the most effective method (including electronic means) to the student’s address as it then appears on the official records of the University. The notice shall inform the student of the rule or regulation allegedly violated, fairly inform the student of the reported circumstances of the alleged violation, and request the student to appear in the OSRR for a hearing on the incident. A reference to these regulations shall accompany each notice of charges. A copy of the notice of charges may be sent to the parent or guardian of the student if the student is a dependent as defined in Section 152 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended.
    4. Failure to Respond to Charges
      1. If the notice of charges requests the student to appear in the OSRR and the student fails or refuses to appear, the hearing officer may, after such investigation as he/she may deem necessary, dismiss the charges, take informal action, or impose a disciplinary sanction/decision that may include educational sanctions.
      2. If the hearing officer takes informal action, he/she shall notify the student in writing of such action, and that action shall not be subject to further hearing or appeal. If the hearing officer imposes a disciplinary sanction as defined in A-5 of these regulations, he/she shall notify the student in writing of such action and the student may appeal this action to the VPSA or EVPAA/ Provost as provided in Section III-C-6.
      3. When it appears necessary to avoid undue hardship or to avoid injustice, the hearing officer may extend the time to enable a student to respond to the charges.
    5. Response to Charges
      1. If the student appears in response to the notice of charges for the purpose of a conference regarding the alleged violation as provided in Section III-C-5, the OSRR shall advise the student as fully as possible of the facts concerning the charges and the names of witnesses then known to the OSRR. The hearing officer and the student will make a determination as to whether an individual hearing or a hearing before the Purdue University Community Standards Board (CSB) should occur. However, the final determination shall be made by the hearing officer.
      2. The student shall also be advised that no response is required; that any statement made by the student may be used against the student; that if the student remains silent, that silence will not be taken as an admission against the student; and that the student may advise the OSRR of any witnesses or information/facts supporting the student’s position. The hearing officer shall advise the student that if any new information is discovered during an investigation subsequent to the conference or administrative hearing, the student will have an opportunity to respond to such information.
    6. Procedures for Conducting Hearings
      1. Each hearing shall be conducted before one or more members of the OSRR, one of whom will serve as the hearing officer, and although the hearing is informal in nature, it shall provide the student certain procedural safeguards.
      2. The student shall be given the opportunity to hear information regarding the alleged violation; rebut statements made by witnesses; and present witnesses, or any relevant information in the student’s own behalf. The student also shall be given the opportunity to respond to any new information gathered during an investigation subsequent to the hearing. After hearing all relevant information, the OSRR hearing officer has the responsibility to determine if substantial information demonstrates that it is more likely than not that the student is responsible for the alleged violations. The decision of the hearing officer shall be based solely on information introduced at the hearing and obtained during subsequent investigations. The finding shall be rendered by the original hearing officer, who shall be present for all testimony and investigations by the OSRR office.
      3. No person other than the student, his/her advisor as defined above and staff members of OSRR shall be present during the discussion between the hearing officer and the student except by mutual agreement of both parties. In cases of alleged sexual assault, the student’s accuser may have an advisor present during the hearing.
      4. Within five University business days following the conclusion of the hearing and subsequent investigation, the OSRR hearing officer shall notify the student in writing of what action it will take. The decision letter shall contain a finding as to the responsibility of the accused student and a brief statement of the reasons for the sanction/decision. Any disciplinary sanction imposed or informal action taken is subject to the provisions of Section III-B-4 and any other University rule, regulation, or directive then existing. Both the student and the student’s accuser shall be informed of the outcome of any hearing brought alleging a sexual assault (Clery Act).
      5. After the disciplinary hearing with the student and any further investigation the hearing officer deems necessary, the OSRR shall proceed as follows:
        1. If the hearing officer determines that the violation alleged is not supported by the information/facts, the charges shall be dismissed and the student notified in writing.
        2. If the hearing officer is satisfied that the violation occurred as alleged, but that no disciplinary sanction shall be imposed, the OSRR may take informal action and notify the student. Such action by the OSRR shall be final and not subject to further hearing or appeal.
        3. If the hearing officer is satisfied that the violation occurred as alleged and that a disciplinary sanction/decision is imposed, the OSRR shall notify the student in writing. A student may appeal a disciplinary sanction as provided in Section III-C-8 (Appeal of the Disciplinary Decision).
    7. Procedures of a Purdue University Community Standards Board Hearing
    8. Members of the Community Standards Board (CSB) hear the most serious conduct cases that may result in suspension, expulsion or degree revocation. Cases may also be heard if a student disputes the complaints or a conduct officer wants the CSB to hear the case. The Board is composed of five members chosen from a pool of applicants representing undergraduates, graduate students, staff and faculty. Board members are trained to function as a team, are taught to ask clear, sensitive and relevant questions to determine the facts of the case, consider the facts carefully and make recommendations for fair sanctions.
      1. Each hearing shall be conducted before the members of the Purdue University Community Standards Board (CSB). The hearing is formal in nature.
      2. The student shall be given the opportunity to hear information regarding the alleged violation; rebut statements made by witnesses and present witnesses, or any relevant information in the student’s own behalf. After hearing all relevant information, the CSB will deliberate and make a written recommendation to the Dean of Students regarding whether substantial information demonstrates that it is more likely than not that the student is responsible for the alleged violation, and if so, recommend sanctions to the Dean of Students. The recommendation of the Community Standards Board shall be based solely on information introduced at the hearing.
      3. Community Standards Board (CSB) shall be comprised of five members: three students, one faculty and one administrative staff member. In instances of alleged academic dishonesty or in cases where degree revocation is a potential sanction, a faculty member shall be required as a member of the Community Standards Board.
      4. A chair is selected by the members of the CSB to preside over all CSB proceedings. The chair of the hearing board shall vote only in the case of a tie. Four board members constitute a quorum and consist of at least three students and one staff or faculty member.
      5. The hearing shall follow a procedure similar to that of a disciplinary hearing, including the student being given the opportunity to hear the information/facts against him/her. Both the referred student and the OSRR student conduct officer appear before the board to present testimony and evidence about the incident. Each may provide witnesses. Board members may direct questions to the complainant, respondent or witnesses.
      6. No person other than the student, his/her advisor, or witnesses shall be present during the hearing except by mutual agreement of the CSB and the student. In cases of alleged sexual assault, the student’s accuser may have an advisor present during the hearing.
      7. After hearing all relevant information, the CSB will deliberate and make a written recommendation to the Dean of Students regarding whether the student is responsible for the alleged violation, and if so, recommend sanctions to the Dean of Students. In cases in which degree revocation is the recommended sanction, this recommendation will also be forwarded to the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Academic Affairs (for undergraduate students) or to the Dean of the Graduate School (for graduate students).
      8. Within five University business days following the conclusion of the hearing and any further investigation deemed necessary, the Dean of Students, or in cases involving degree revocation, the Dean of Students and Vice Provost for Undergraduate Academic Affairs (for undergraduate students) or to the Dean of the Graduate School (for graduate students) shall review the recommendation of the CSB, and make the determination whether substantial information demonstrates that it is more likely than not that the student is responsible for the alleged violations. The Dean of Student shall notify the student of the decision. The decision letter shall contain a finding as to the responsibility of the accused student and a brief statement of the reasons for the sanction, if any. Any disciplinary sanction imposed or informal action taken is subject to the provisions of Section III-B-4 and any other University rule, regulation, or directive. Information regarding the appeal form and notification of appeals procedures shall be provided in the decision letter if the student is found responsible for the violations.
    9. Appeal of the Disciplinary Decision
      1. A student may appeal a disciplinary sanction where
        1. there is significant new information related to the case that was not available at the time of the initial hearing;
        2. there is evidence that the University failed to follow established procedures; or
        3. the sanction is grossly disproportionate to the offense.
        4. In cases involving alleged academic dishonesty or degree revocation, a student may appeal a disciplinary sanction of the OSRR or CSB to the Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost. All other appeals of disciplinary sanctions imposed by the OSRR or the CSB may be appealed to the Vice President for Student Affairs.
      2. The appeal must be in writing, signed by the student and state the specific grounds for the appeal. The appeal must be physically received in the Office of the VPSA or EVPAA/Provost within seven University business days of the date the decision letter was sent by whatever means the letter was sent. Disciplinary sanctions not appealed within such time are deemed final or, in the case of a degree revocation, are recommended to the Board of Trustees for final action.
      3. Appeals will be decided on the basis of the record of the original proceeding and the written appeals. Oral arguments are not permitted unless written evidence is provided with the appeal.
      4. The VPSA or EVPAA/Provost shall review all material pertinent to the case. The VPSA or EVPAA/Provost may affirm the findings and/or sanction, decrease or increase the sanction, or remand the case to the original hearing authority for a second hearing. If a second hearing is convened, the hearing authority shall submit its final determination to the VPSA or EVPAA/Provost for his/her review and decision.
      5. Following the appeal, a student will be notified in writing of the outcome of the case. All decisions are final, subject only, in the case of a degree revocation, to final action by the Board of Trustees.
    10. Summary Action. Summary disciplinary action by way of temporary suspension and exclusion from University property may be taken against a student charged with conduct without the issuance of a notice of charges and without the procedures prescribed in Section III-C on the following conditions: Summary action shall be taken only by the President, the EVPAA/Provost or the VPSA, and only after the student shall have been given an opportunity to be heard if such procedure is practical and feasible under the circumstances. Summary action shall be taken only if the President, EVPAA/Provost or VPSA is satisfied that the continued presence of the student on University property threatens harm to the student or to any other persons or to the property of the University or of others. Whenever summary action is taken under this Section III-C-11, the procedures provided for in Section III-C for hearing and appeal shall be expedited so far as possible in order to shorten the period of summary action.
  4. The Campus Appeals Board is established to hear appeals concerning decisions made by the University about student organizations, Student Supreme Court decisions, and complaints under the Student Bill of Rights.
    1. Organization
      1. The Campus Appeals Board shall be established for each campus of the University.
      2. The Campus Appeals Board for the West Lafayette Campus, for each hearing, shall consist of three undergraduate students, one graduate student, two faculty members, and two administrators. The Campus Appeals Board shall be drawn from a pool of 20 members selected in the following manner: eight undergraduate students shall be recommended by the Purdue Student Government and two graduate students shall be recommended by the Purdue Graduate Student Government to the University Senate Nominating Committee. The University Senate will nominate five faculty members for appointment by the president. Five administrative staff members shall be appointed by the president of Purdue University, one of whom shall be designated as chairperson of the Campus Appeals Board. This member will have voting rights only in the event of a tie. From this pool of members, the chairperson of the Campus Appeals Board shall designate the particular members as may be necessary. In exceptional circumstances, additional members may be selected, as stated above, to ease the responsibility of an unusually large number of appeals. (University Senate Document 93-8, March 28, 1994).
      3. The term of office for student members shall be one year. The term of office of the faculty and administrative members shall be for two years beginning on June 1, and ending on May 31, two years later. No member shall serve more than two consecutive terms. If any appointing authority fails to make the initial appointments to the Campus Appeals Board within the time specified, or if at any time the Campus Appeals Board cannot function because of the refusal of any member or members to serve, the president of the University may make appointments, fill vacancies, or take such other action as he/she deems necessary to constitute a Campus Appeals Board for each campus of the University.
      4. The Campus Appeals Board shall elect a vice chairperson and secretary. It shall adopt regulations governing its procedures not inconsistent with these regulations. It shall have only the jurisdiction herein granted.
    2. Appeals Concerning Student Organizations. The Campus Appeals Board has jurisdiction to hear and shall hear any appeal made by a student organization that the Office of the Dean of Students refuses to recognize or against which a student organization misconduct penalty of suspension or withdrawal of recognition has been proposed by the Office of the Dean of Students. In a case of the dean’s office refusal to recognize a student organization, the Campus Appeals Board has the power to uphold or reverse the dean’s office decision. In a case of an appeal of a proposed student organization conduct sanction/decision, the Campus Appeals Board has the power:
      1. * To affirm the finding and sanction/decision proposed;
      2. * To affirm the finding and change the sanction/decision to any listed in Part 7, Section IX; or
      3. * To reverse the finding and dismiss the sanction/decision. In any case, the action of the Campus Appeals Board is final.
    3. Appeals from Student Supreme Court. The Campus Appeals Board shall have discretionary jurisdiction to hear appeals from the Student Supreme Court. In such cases, it may affirm or reverse a decision, and its action shall be final.
    4. Complaints under Bill of Student Rights. The Campus Appeals Board shall hear complaints from students concerning actions or decisions made by the University that are claimed to violate rights established under the Bill of Student Rights. In such cases, the Campus Appeals Board shall have the power and duty to make findings and recommendations to the president of the University.
  5. Grade Appeals System
    1. Adoption by Faculty. The faculty of the University at the West Lafayette Campus has adopted the following procedures for grade appeals pursuant to the authority delegated to the faculty. The Board of Trustees hereby approves such procedures for the West Lafayette Campus.
    2. General.
      1. In the academic community, grades are a measure of student achievement toward fulfillment of course objectives. The responsibility for assessing student achievement and assigning grades rests with the faculty, and, except for unusual circumstances, the course grade given is final.
      2. The grade appeals system affords recourse to a student who has evidence or believes that evidence exists to show that an inappropriate grade has been assigned as a result of prejudice, caprice, or other improper conditions such as mechanical error, or assignment of a grade inconsistent with those assigned other students. Additionally, a student may challenge the reduction of a grade for alleged scholastic dishonesty.
      3. The only University authorities empowered to change grades are the instructor or, in the case of teaching assistants, the faculty member in charge of the course in question and the chairman/chairwoman of the University Grade Appeals Committee acting in behalf of the school and University grade appeals committees.
      4. Informal attempts must be made to resolve grade grievances and appeals at the lowest possible level - through the course instructor, through the department head, or through other informal procedures outlined by the college/school and/or department in which the course was taught.
      5. Graduate students who wish to appeal grades received in regular coursework may do so through the grade appeals system. Cases involving the decisions of graduate examination committees, the acceptance of graduate theses, and the application of professional standards relating to the retention of graduate students shall be handled by procedures authorized by the Graduate Council rather than the grade appeals system.
      6. When a student initiates a formal grade appeal, he/she should be prepared to state in what way his/her grade assignment was arbitrary, capricious, or otherwise improper. At that time, he/she may seek the assistance of the dean of students, the chairperson of one of the grade appeals committees, or his/her academic advisor.
      7. In appealing a grade, the burden of proof is on the student, except in the case of alleged academic dishonesty, where the instructor must support the allegation.
    3. College/School Grade Appeals Committees.
      1. Each of the colleges/schools of Purdue University at the West Lafayette Campus will establish a Grade Appeals Committee to hear grade grievances and appeals that are not resolved informally at a lower level. Each committee will consist of two students (undergraduate or graduate corresponding to the status of the appellant), three members of the instructional faculty, and a non-voting chairperson. The chairperson of the committee will be an assistant or associate dean of the college/school appointed by the dean. The chairperson will be responsible for assuring adherence to established procedures, convening members for an appeal, and maintaining records. The chairperson has the authority to grant warranted time extension in the appeals process described below.
      2. Voting members of the committee will be selected from a pool of at least eight students and eight instructional faculty. The pool of members of the committee will be selected according to school/college procedures in the spring (not later than May 1) to commence serving on the first day of the following fall semester. No member shall serve more than two consecutive terms in the pool.
    4. University Grade Appeals Committee.
      1. A University Grade Appeals Committee, with the authority to hear appeals of school committee decisions, shall be established for the West Lafayette Campus. The University committee shall be responsible to and report to the Faculty Affairs Committee of the University Senate. In all appeal cases, the committee shall consist of two students (undergraduate or graduate to correspond to the status of the appealing student) and four members of the instructional faculty. They shall be selected in the following manner: four undergraduate students nominated by the student body president and confirmed by the Student Senate; four graduate students appointed by the Committee on Student Affairs of the University Senate; and eight faculty members selected by the University Senate. The student members shall be appointed annually. Two of the faculty members of the committee shall be elected annually for a three-year term.
      2. The members shall be selected in the spring (not later than May 1) to start serving on the first day of the following fall semester. No member shall serve more than two consecutive terms. If any appointing authority fails to make the initial appointments to the University Grade Appeals Committee within the specified time, or to fill any vacancy on the panel of members within five days after being notified to do so by the chairperson of the University Grade Appeals Committee, or if at any time the University Grade Appeals Committee cannot function because of refusal of any member to serve, the chairperson of the Faculty Affairs Committee may make appointments, fill vacancies, or take such other actions as he/she deems necessary to constitute a University Grade Appeals Committee.
      3. Annually, at the last University Grade Appeals Committee meeting of the academic year, the members for the coming year plus all retiring committee members shall elect (by majority vote) one of the eight regular faculty members to act as the new non-voting chairperson of the committee.
      4. The University Grade Appeals Committee shall adopt its own hearing proceedings, and establish uniform procedures to be followed by the college/school committees. The chairperson of the University Grade Appeals Committee shall be responsible for insuring that all school grade appeals committees are properly constituted and functional.
    5. Initiating a Grade Appeal.
      1. Prior to initiating a grade appeal, the student is strongly encouraged to resolve the situation with the instructor, department head, or head’s designee. The department head is strongly encouraged to facilitate an informal resolution process between the parties.
      2. Appeal Process.
        1. A student who wishes to initiate a grade appeal must file a written statement of allegations, facts, and circumstances concerning the grade assigned with the chairperson of the Grade Appeals Committee of the college/school in which the course was taken. This must be done within 30 calendar days after the start of the regular semester following the one in which the questioned grade was given.
        2. After receipt of the student’s written statement, the chairperson will promptly furnish a copy of the statement to the involved instructor who has seven days to make a written response. The chairperson will submit the statement of appeal and any responses to each of the members of the college/school grade appeals committee. Committee members will review the written documents within seven calendar days from the date they are received. If one voting member of the committee rules that the allegations warrant a hearing or are best addressed through a hearing, a hearing will be held; otherwise, the appeal will be denied. With reasonable cause, the chairperson may override the decision not to hear the case.
        3. If the appeal is to be heard, the chairperson will promptly give notice of the time, date, and place of the hearing to the parties involved. The hearing will be scheduled not more than 14 calendar days after notice to the student and instructor.
        4. The instructor will promptly make all pertinent grading records available to the college/school committee’s chairperson. In advance of the hearing, the chairperson may at his/her discretion make available to the student those records (or portions thereof) that he/she judges to be relevant in light of the student’s allegations.
    6. Conduct of College/School Grade Appeals Committee Hearing, General.
      1. The hearing shall be closed, unless both parties agree in writing that it be open. The chairperson’s determination of the hearing location and the number of individuals that can be conveniently accommodated shall be final. The student and the instructor are both entitled to be accompanied at the hearing by advisors of their choice. Because the hearings are administrative and not judicial in nature, the advisors may not be lawyers. Both parties have the right to present evidence and witnesses in their behalf and to confront and question opposing witnesses.
      2. Under normal circumstances, if the duly notified student complainant does not appear for the hearing the complaint shall be dismissed, the case closed, and these actions not subject to further hearing or appeal. If, however, a duly notified faculty member does not appear, the hearing will continue on the presumption that there is no desire to challenge evidence or witnesses presented by the student.
      3. An official audio recording shall be made of each hearing and filed by the chairperson of the respective college/school committee for at least one year. The recording will be confidential and used only if further appeal is granted by the University Grade Appeals Committee or under legal compulsion.
      4. At the conclusion of the hearing, the committee may (by a majority vote of the committee membership) recommend changing the original grade. A written report of the committee’s decision shall be sent to both parties and the chairperson of the University Grade Appeals Committee no later than three days after the conclusion of the hearing. Either party may, within six class days of receipt of the decision, file a written notice of intent to request further appeal with the chairperson of the University Grade Appeals Committee. If no such notice is received by the chairperson within the six-day period, the decision shall not be subject to further hearing appeal. If, at that time, the instructor who originally gave the grade is not willing to initiate a recommended change, the chairperson of the University Grade Appeals Committee shall file the directed change with the registrar who shall record the new grade.
      5. The chairperson of each college/school committee will maintain a written record of all grade appeals heard in the college/school and provide an annual overview of the grade appeals process to the Provost.
    7. Appeal of a College/School Committee Decision.
      1. Under certain specific circumstances (Sec III-E-7-b) either the student or the instructor may file a request for an appeal of the college/school grade appeals committee decision. If the appeal request is granted, the case will be heard by the University Grade Appeals Committee. The process may be initiated by filing a personally signed notice of appeal with the chairperson of the University Grade Appeals Committee within the six-day limit (Section III-E-6-d). The notice shall be accompanied by a written statement of the alleged procedural irregularities or new evidence, or a substantial enumeration of why the appellant believes the college/school committee decision is erroneous or unfair. Upon request, the respective college/school committee chairperson immediately will transmit the audio recording of the college/school hearing and any other items of evidence presented at the college/school hearing to the chairperson of the University Grade Appeals Committee. The decision of the University Grade Appeals Committee to grant or deny appeals from school committees shall be final.
      2. If the University Grade Appeals Committee finds, on the basis of the appellant’s written statement and other available evidence, that substantial procedural irregularities or inequities existed in the college/school hearing or that substantial new evidence has been uncovered, the University Grade Appeals Committee shall hear the case de novo. Additionally, the committee may, at its discretion, hear appeals from the college/school level, when the appellant’s statement substantiates to its satisfaction that the college/school decision may have been erroneous or unfair. If the University Grade Appeals Committee grants an appeal, the chairperson shall promptly give notice to both parties of the time, date, and place of hearing (which shall be held not less than five and, whenever practicable, not more than 10 days after the receipt of such notice), as well as providing them with a copy of the procedures and sequence of events to be followed in conducting the hearing.
    8. Conduct of University Grade Appeal Committee Hearing, General.
      1. The appeal hearing shall be closed, unless both parties agree in writing for it to be open. The chairperson’s determination of the hearing location and the number of individuals that can be conveniently accommodated shall be final. The appellant and opposing parties are both entitled to be accompanied at the hearing by advisors of their choice. Because the hearings are administrative and not judicial in nature, the advisors may not be lawyers. If an appeal is heard on the basis of procedural irregularity or new evidence, both parties have the right to present evidence and witnesses in their behalf and to confront and question opposing witnesses. If, however, the University Grade Appeals Committee elects to hear an appeal on the grounds that the college/school grade appeals committee’s decision appears to be erroneous or unfair, it shall not accept additional evidence but shall consider only matters introduced at the college/school hearing. The audio record of the college/school hearing shall be made available for audition by both parties and the members of the University committee. Additionally, the committee may, at its discretion, have a transcript of the college/school hearing prepared. If a transcript is prepared, it will be safeguarded and used in the same fashion as audio records of hearings.
      2. If a duly notified appellant does not appear for the hearing, the committee may close the case and it will be subject to no further hearing or appeal. If the opposing party (having been duly notified) does not appear, the hearing will continue on the presumption that there is no desire to challenge evidence or witnesses that may be presented.
      3. An official audio recording shall be made of each hearing and kept by the chairperson of the University committee for at least one year. The recording will be confidential and used only under legal compulsion in civil court proceedings.
      4. After the University Grade Appeals Committee hears an appeal, it may (by a majority vote of the committee membership) recommend changing the original grade. A written report of the University Grade Appeals Committee’s decision shall be sent to both parties no later than 15 days after the conclusion of the hearing. If the instructor who originally gave the grade is not willing to initiate any recommended grade change, the chairperson of the University Grade Appeals Committee shall file the change with the registrar who shall record the new grade. The University Grade Appeals Committee’s decision is final, and shall not be subject to further hearing or appeal.
    9. Other Academic/Grade Appeal Jurisdictions.
      1. Informal boards or committees may be established within academic departments to resolve grade grievances and appeals.
      2. Students involved in cases of alleged academic dishonesty may be subject to disciplinary penalties under Section III-B-2-a of the Regulations Governing Student Conduct, Disciplinary Proceedings, and Appeals.

Policy for Involuntary Withdrawal of Students

(Approved by the Board of Trustees, January 19-20, 1978, and revised by administrative approval on August 31, 1992)

Subject to the University’s duties under the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990 and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as amended (as they may be amended from time to time), a student may be asked to withdraw voluntarily or may be administratively withdrawn involuntarily from the University when, in the judgment of the dean of students and the director of the University Health Center, the student:

  1. Poses a direct threat to the health or safety of self or others; or
  2. Has interfered with the rights of other students, faculty, staff, or other members of the University community or with the exercise of any proper activities, functions, or duties of the University or its personnel, or has repeatedly harassed any member of the University community.
  3. The dean of students shall determine whether each individual case should be handled through this policy or through normal disciplinary procedures.
    1. A student may be requested in writing and/or orally (depending upon the urgency of the situation) to attend an informal meeting with the dean of students and director of the University Health Center for the purpose of determining whether the student should be withdrawn. Such a request will include a statement of the reasons for University concern. Parents, spouses, or other appropriate persons (i.e., faculty, roommates, heads of residence units, etc.) may be contacted either by the student or by the University for information and may, with the consent of the student, participate in the informal meeting. At the meeting the reasons for the University’s concern regarding the student will be clearly stated and the student will be given an opportunity to respond to these concerns. If after the meeting it is determined that the student should be permitted to continue his/her enrollment, the student will be so informed in writing.
    2. If after the informal meeting the dean of students and the director of the University Health Center decide that the student should be required to withdraw from the University and be permitted to reenter the University only with their approval, the student shall be informed of such decision and the reasons therefore. The student will receive a written notice of the decision and reasons as soon as administratively convenient. If the student agrees to voluntarily withdraw from the University on such conditions, regular withdrawal procedures will be followed. However, the student may be permitted to withdraw voluntarily without grades if in the judgment of the dean of students and the director of the University Health Center the circumstances warrant such action.
    3. If the student refuses to accept the decision of withdrawal reached by the dean of students and the director of the University Health Center, and refuses to withdraw from the University voluntarily, the student shall notify the dean of students of such refusal. He/She may then appeal the withdrawal decision to a committee appointed by the president of the University consisting of a faculty member, a student, and a University administrator other than a member of the staff of either the dean of students or director of the University Health Center. The committee shall hear the matter de novo after notice to the student and the dean of students and the director of the University Health Center. The issue to be determined by the committee shall be whether the student should be involuntarily withdrawn from the University pursuant to Section A(1) or A(2). The student and the dean of students and the director of the University Health Center may attend the hearing and present evidence and question witnesses. They may be represented by counsel. The committee shall make a written report containing its findings and conclusions. Copies of the report shall be furnished to the student, the dean of students, the director of the University Health Center, and the president. The decision of the committee shall be binding upon the student and the University.

Miscellaneous Conduct Regulations

  1. Guests in Student Residence Units
    1. Within certain University-set limitations, residence units may determine the hours during which guests of the opposite sex may visit individual student rooms in undergraduate residence units. By secret ballot, a majority of the residents of the unit can approve a more restrictive policy. Any resident must be guaranteed his/her privacy, which takes priority over a guest. Individual students wishing to visit friends of the opposite sex in their rooms must do so in conformance with the approved plan in that particular residence unit. Check the guest hours policy posted in the residence unit.
    2. Guest hours for students of the same sex are limited only by the policy of the particular residence unit.
  2. Financial Obligations
    1. Students should make every effort to keep their credit good in the community for their own benefit and that of all students.
    2. Students with past due financial obligations to the University may have their registration encumbered. (See Scholastic Records, Encumbrance, in Section D.) Degree candidates delinquent in financial obligations must remove such debts at least one week before the close of any term. Otherwise his/her diploma may be withheld, or if the degree is granted without knowledge of such delinquency, the degree may be revoked and the diploma cancelled.
  3. Absence from the University
    1. For emergency purposes, it is important that the University be able to locate students at all times. All students are requested, therefore, to leave information with the office of their University residence unit and the officer of any other unit or at least a roommate when they are off campus and especially if they are going out of town. They are also encouraged to let their parents know when they will be away from campus for out-of-town travel.
  4. Change of Address
    1. Students are required to notify the registrar of any change of campus or home address.
  5. Use of Alcoholic Beverages
    1. All Purdue students are responsible for complying with the Indiana state laws.
      Attention is called to the Indiana Alcoholic Beverages Law that states specifically:
      1. No person under 21 years of age may use or be in possession of alcoholic beverages.
      2. Persons 21 or over may not make alcoholic beverages available to minors.
      3. Misrepresentation of age for the purpose of purchasing alcoholic beverages is a violation of state law.
    2. In addition to Indiana state laws, the following University regulations apply:
      1. The University prohibits the possession, consumption, distribution, or sale of alcoholic beverages, as defined by state law, in or on any University property, with the following exceptions:
      • Personal possession and consumption of alcoholic beverages are permitted in Purdue Village (family apartments only), resident rooms in Young and Hawkins halls occupied exclusively by graduate students, and by registered occupants of guest rooms in the Union Club and Young and Hawkins halls, subject to compliance with all University regulations and applicable Indiana state laws.
      • Possession, consumption, distribution, and sale of alcoholic beverages are permitted, with advance approval by the Executive Vice President and Treasurer or his/her designee, in areas designated by the University and under the supervision of the Purdue Memorial Union or the Department of Hospitality and Tourism Management, subject to compliance with all University regulations and applicable Indiana state laws.
      1. The University prohibits the serving of alcoholic beverages in any University undergraduate residence hall, and at any function on campus where a majority of attendees are projected by University management to be less than 21 years of age.
        • All policies and procedures regarding the approval of and funding for a student organizational event must be complied with and completed before a request for service of alcoholic beverages will be considered (Approved by the Board of Trustees, May 31, 1997).
      2. Members of recognized fraternities, sororities, and cooperative housing organizations shall be subject to the following conditions concerning the possession and consumption of alcoholic beverages on the premises of their houses.
        • Under no circumstances may alcoholic beverages be sold. Alcoholic beverages may not be available at any event where an admission fee is charged.
        • Alcoholic beverages may not be consumed outside the house.
        • Alcoholic beverages and containers for alcoholic beverages may not be displayed outside the house.
        • Alcoholic beverages may not be provided or consumed at any open event. (For purposes of these regulations, an event is open if verbal or written invitations are extended en masse to the general public or to an unreasonable large segment of the campus community [i.e., a number of invited guests greater than a host house can reasonably expect to accommodate, which is determined by the Office of the Dean of Students to be no more than three invited guests for each resident of the host house]. An event is closed if only members of the sponsoring organization[s] and their personally invited guests participate. There may be no more than four organizations participating in an event at a host house, regardless of the aforementioned three-to-one policy.)
        • All sponsoring organizations are equally responsible for open and closed events and for compliance with University regulations and applicable laws.
    3. See Executive Memorandum C-44, Alcohol and Drug-Free Campus and Workplace Policy (June 12, 1998).
  6. Use of Motor Vehicles, Bicycles, Skateboards, In-line Skates, and Traffic Regulations
    1. Anyone using motor vehicles or bicycles on the West Lafayette Campus is responsible for observing the detailed regulations regarding their use. Copies are available at the Parking Facilities Office. Before considering the use of a vehicle a student should be aware of the following basic regulations:
      1. In general, all parking during restricted hours (7 a.m.-5 p.m., M-F) is by permit or in the Grant Street Parking Garage. Some areas and spaces are restricted at all times.
      2. All motor vehicle and bicycle operators must comply with state and municipal laws or ordinances.
      3. Bicycles are not permitted inside any University building and must be parked in bicycle racks or pads provided for this purpose. (It is recommended that parked bicycles be locked.)
      4. Skateboards are prohibited on the north and south academic campuses. Skateboards and in-line skate usage is prohibited on any surface that could be damaged.
      5. Operators or owners of vehicles are subject to fines if they are in violation of the motor vehicle or bicycle regulations.
  7. Student Identification Cards
    1. Every student who pays fees is issued a permanent identification card by the Office of the Bursar after payment of fees. The student identification card permits him/her to attend various events, take books out of the library, cash checks, establish charge accounts, etc., where his/her identification as a student is required. These identification cards are University documents and may not be altered in any way. Any defacement or alteration of the identification card is a violation of University regulations and is subject to disciplinary action. The identification card is a personal document and should never be out of its owner’s possession. It is validated by the bursar at the beginning of each semester when fees are paid. If the identification card is lost, it may be replaced by the Office of the Bursar upon the written request of the student. A replacement fee will be charged.
  8. All students are subject to University policy V.III, “Intellectual Property,” as amended from time to time.
  9. Use of Copyrighted Materials
    1. All members of the Purdue University community are responsible for complying with the United States Copyright Law and with Purdue University’s Executive Memorandum B-53, as amended from time to time, which governs the use of copyrighted works for educational and research purposes.
    2. Copyright is a federal law that protects creative works such as Web sites, CDs, DVDs, audio and visual works, computer programs, books, and journals. Copyright allows authors to control the use of their works for a limited period of time. Authors or the owners of the copyrighted work have exclusive rights to the work. It is their decision as to whether the work can be copied and/or distributed. Violating the copyright owner’s rights is considered copyright infringement and may be subject to legal action.
    3. Works are protected for a limited period of time but once that time period has expired, the work becomes part of the public domain. The public can then freely use the works without paying royalties or obtaining permission from the copyright holder.
    4. Works created on or after January 1, 1978, are protected for a term of the life of the author plus 70 years. If the work is a product of a corporate author, then the protection is for the shorter of 95 years from first publication or 120 years from creation. Works that were published prior to 1923 no longer have copyright protection and are in the public domain. Any work created or published from 1923 to the present time should be considered still protected by the copyright law.
    5. There are exemptions to the copyright law that allow use of a work without seeking permission. One of the most utilized exemptions in higher education is the fair use exemption. This exemption is a four factor test that weighs whether the use of a work is fair under certain circumstances. If the use is not fair and no other exemption is applicable to the specific use of the work, then permission from the copyright holder must be granted before the work can be used.
    6. For further information on the copyright law, please visit the University Copyright Office’s Web site at www.lib.purdue.edu/uco.
  10. Commercial Note Taking in Classes (University Senate Document 03-9, April 19, 2004.)
    1. As used in this paragraph, the term “instructor” is defined as the individual who authored the material being presented as part of the course.
    2. Among the materials that may be protected by copyright law are the lectures, notes, and other material presented in class or as part of the course. Always assume the materials presented by an instructor are protected by copyright unless the instructor has stated otherwise. Students enrolled in, and authorized visitors to, Purdue University courses are permitted to take notes, which they may use for individual/group study or for other non-commercial purposes reasonably arising from enrollment in the course or the University generally.
    3. Notes taken in class are, however, generally considered to be “derivative works” of the instructor’s presentations and materials, and they are thus subject to the instructor’s copyright in such presentations and materials. No individual is permitted to sell or otherwise barter notes, either to other students or to any commercial concern, for a course without the express written permission of the course instructor. To obtain permission to sell or barter notes, the individual wishing to sell or barter the notes must be registered in the course or must be an approved visitor to the class. Course instructors may choose to grant or not grant such permission at their own discretion, and may require a review of the notes prior to their being sold or bartered. If they do grant such permission, they may revoke it at any time, if they so choose.