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    Purdue University
   
 
  Sep 20, 2017
 
 
    
2016-2017 University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

VII. Administering Graduate Degree Programs



Graduate degree programs are subject to policies and procedures established by the Graduate Council and the dean of the Graduate School.  It is the policy of the Graduate School to delegate to the departments and their staff the maximum responsibility for the maintenance of academic standards.  The Graduate School staff does not normally counsel individual graduate students relative to their academic programs and degree progress.  In all matters concerning a student or the student’s academic program, the Graduate School will take no action (except in unusual cases) without prior approval or recommendation of the student’s major professor, advisory committee, or the head of his or her graduate program.  Any necessary communication with the Graduate School should be made through the student’s department. (See Sections I-C , I-D , and I-E )

Although Graduate School deadlines are specified throughout this section of the manual, departments may set earlier deadlines.


A. Departmental Advising and Supervision

  1. Major Professor
    Every student in a degree program is required to select a major professor who acts as the chair of the advisory committee and who agrees to supervise the student’s graduate study, research, and writing.  The major professor/student relationship must be a mutually acceptable one.
     
  2. Advisory Committee
    The student and the major professor are responsible for the selection of an advisory committee.  The duties of that committee are to assist the student in the preparation of the plan of study and to offer advice during the period of graduate work, including research and thesis preparation when these are required components of the student’s degree program.

    The committee consists of the major professor and at least two other members of the graduate faculty (with the exception of non-thesis master’s degree programs that have approval for a one-member advisory committee. Please refer to Section VII. A. 2. a). Committees must be approved by the head of the graduate program, the college dean (if requested by the college), and the dean of the Graduate School. Because it is crucial for advisory committee members to bring independent thought and decision-making to their advisory committee roles, the Graduate School strongly recommends that major professors, graduate students, and other individuals involved in the advisory committee selection process strive to avoid appointments where there may be potential conflicts of interest. Advisory committee appointments of spouses/partners, partners in business, or those with financial conflicts of interest connected to the graduate student, for example, should be carefully reviewed and alternatives considered. Members of the committee need not be faculty with whom the student has taken coursework, however, at least 51% of the committee members must have regular graduate faculty certification. The request to the dean of the Graduate School for appointment of the advisory committee is made on the same form and at the same time as the request for approval of the student’s plan of study. (See Section VII-B.) The dean of the Graduate School may appoint additional members if it seems advisable.
    1. One-Member Advisory Committee Flexibility Option
      A minimum of one member of the graduate faculty may be permitted to serve and fully constitute the membership of the advisory committee for non-thesis master’s students who are meeting degree requirements entirely through the completion of courses. Departments wishing to pursue this option should submit a request to the Graduate Records Manager in the Graduate School, or the appropriate director of graduate studies at the regional campuses.  Being as specific as possible, this request should outline what concentrations, cohorts, delivery methods (distance or campus based) or other features will qualify for this option.

      Once approved, all non-thesis students within the department will be given technical access to list just one advisory committee member on the plan of study, even if this option is not appropriate for all. It is the department’s responsibility to carefully review each proposed plan of study; if a student who does not qualify for the one-member advisory committee option lists only one member, the form must be rejected.

      Please note that a Final Examination Report Form (G.S. Form 7) must be submitted for all master’s students using the One Member Advisory Committee Flexibility  option, unless the department also has an approved Alternative Graduation Criteria option. (See Section VII-F.2.)
  3. Changes in the Advisory Committee

    Changes to the advisory committee must be submitted electronically via myPurdue if the plan of study was submitted electronically. Advisory committee changes on a paper plan of study should be requested using the Request for Change to the Plan of Study (G.S. Form 13). Each request for a change must be accompanied by a rationale and be signed by the student and each committee member whose status is affected by the request. If a paper form is used, it is the responsibility of the chair of the advisory committee to obtain the signatures of all committee members whose status is being changed. The request must be approved by the major professor, the head of the graduate program, and the college dean (if requested by the college). It is important to notify the Graduate School immediately of any change in the major professor to ensure that appropriate signatures are on forms.

    In very rare instances in which an advisory committee member in any role does not approve a student’s request for a change in the advisory committee, the student may ask (in writing) for review and assistance from the dean of the Graduate School who will forward it to his/her designee.   This action by the student should be utilized after he/she has made at least three contacts (in writing) to the advisory committee member over a period of at least one month to secure approval.    The dean of the Graduate School’s designee will convene a committee of three faculty members/administrators, normally including the graduate student’s college associate dean, department head, and departmental graduate committee chair, to consider the situation.  A majority vote of this committee is required to ask the dean of the Graduate School’s designee to remove an advisory committee member from that role.  The dean of the Graduate School’s designee is a non-voting facilitator and serves as a liaison between the Graduate School, the college/department, and the student.  If the student believes that either composition of the committee did not allow him/her to have a fair review or the process was not properly followed, he/she may appeal directly to the dean of the Graduate School within 10 days of the issuance of the committee’s decision. 

B. Plan of Study

Each graduate student admitted to a degree program must submit a plan of study.  Although there are no Graduate School requirements for the specific number of credit hours of courses that must appear on the plan of study (except for non-thesis plans of study), the plan must be appropriate to meet the needs of the student in his or her chosen field, as determined by the advisory committee and approved by the head of the graduate program, the college dean (if requested by the college), and the dean of the Graduate School.

The plan of study includes a primary area and may include a related area or areas that are chosen on the basis of the student’s interests and needs.  It is to include the specific courses the student is expected to complete and other requirements of the particular degree being sought.  Research credits (69800 or 69900) are not to appear on the plan of study. The number of credit hours of research should reflect the graduate student’s research and writing efforts.

Doctoral degree requirements may only be satisfied by 69900 credits; however, under certain conditions, 69900 credits may be applied toward the requirements of a thesis master’s degree. A request to use 69900 credits to satisfy master’s degree requirements must be submitted to the Graduate School explaining the need for the use of the 69900 credits and listing which credits (based on session taken) are to be used.  This request must be signed by the major professor and the head of the graduate program. These 69900 credits, used to satisfy master’s degree requirements, will no longer be eligible to be used for the Ph.D. degree, unless they are utilized as part of the up to 30 credits potentially allowed for use from a master’s degree toward a doctoral degree. (See Section VI-2-2-c.)

A tentative plan of study should be drawn up in advance of registration for the first session of graduate work, and the formal plan of study should be submitted electronically as soon as possible (by the end of the third session for doctoral students and by the end of the first session for master’s students).  For plans of study that are not submitted electronically, the Request for Master’s Degree Advisory Committee and Plan of Study Approval (G.S. Form 6) is used for master’s degree programs.  The Request for Ph.D. Degree Advisory Committee and Plan of Study Approval (G.S. Form 4) is used for doctoral degree programs. The Request for Educational Specialist Degree Advisory Committee and Plan of Study Approval (G.S. Form 2) is used for educational specialist degree programs.

  1. Developing the Plan of Study
    1. Requirements Applicable to any Plan of Study

      Course credits earned by a student whose graduate study and/or professional activity has been inactive for five years or more cannot be used on a plan of study for an advanced degree.  A plan of study approved prior to such a period of inactivity is invalid. (See Section III-B-5 .)

      Additional requirements that depend on the status of the student when the course was taken are as follows:
      1. Courses Taken as a Graduate Student at Purdue University
        Neither 10000- nor 20000-level courses may appear on a plan of study.  Otherwise, requirements for the numerical level (30000 through 60000) of courses are determined by each department or administrative unit subject to the restriction that not more than a total of six 30000- or 40000-level course credit hours, with a grade of B- or better, may appear on a plan of study. (See Section VI-B .)
         
      2. Courses Taken in Non-Degree, Teacher License, or Graduate Certificate Status at Purdue University
        Although there is no limit to the number of course credit hours that an individual may accumulate while registered in any of these classifications, no more than 12 total hours of credit earned (with a grade of C- or higher) in non-degree, teacher license, or graduate certificate status may be used on a plan of study.  However, if an application to a degree program is approved during the session in which a person is enrolled for the 12th credit hour as a non-degree, teacher license, or graduate certificate student, all credits taken prior to and during that session will be eligible for inclusion on a plan of study for a degree program, providing the courses are appropriate to the degree program and the courses and grades are acceptable first to the department and then to the Graduate School.

        Please note that the above limitation on course credit hours taken in non-degree, teacher license, or graduate certificate status that can be used on a plan of study will be modified if excess undergraduate credit also is to be applied to the plan of study. [See Section VII-B-1-a-(3) that follows.]
         
      3. Courses Taken as Excess Undergraduate Credit

        Graduate course credits earned while an undergraduate at Purdue University or other accredited institutions of higher learning may be applied toward an advanced degree if these credits are in excess of any requirements for the baccalaureate degree.  Such credits must be certified as available for graduate credit by the institution from which the student received his/her baccalaureate degree, but will be accepted only if:

        1. The student had junior or senior standing when taking the course,
        2. The student received a grade of B or better (work taken under the pass/not-pass option is not acceptable),
        3. The course was designated as a graduate course.

          At Purdue University only, if the work is completed satisfactorily on this basis, the academic advisor (or candidate coordinator or other designee) shall then complete the Academic Record Change (Registrar Form 350), which indicates that the course may be used for graduate credit, and submit the form to the registrar, along with the grade reported, at the close of the student’s final term.  The academic advisor’s (or candidate coordinator’s or designee’s) signature will attest to the fact that the credit is in excess of that required for the baccalaureate degree so that the registrar can then enter the notation “available for graduate credit” on the student’s record.

          The sum of credits earned as undergraduate excess and the credits earned in graduate non-degree, teacher license, or graduate certificate status that can be used on a plan of study is limited to 12 credit hours except as stated in Section VII-B-1-a-(2) above. Any additional conditions under which excess undergraduate credit may be used for graduate credit are determined by the various departments (Graduate Council, April 16, 1992).
      4. Graduate Courses Taken as a Non-degree Undergraduate Student after Receipt of the Baccalaureate Degree
        Graduate courses taken as an undergraduate student, even if completed after receipt of the baccalaureate degree and with the intent to use the credits toward a graduate degree program, are not eligible to satisfy requirements for a graduate degree.
         
      5. Combined Degree Program Credits
        If students are admitted to an approved combined degree program, they are permitted to use a certain number of credits to apply toward both undergraduate and graduate degrees (as outlined in the approved program proposal). Such courses must be listed on the graduate plan of study, and a supplemental note must be added to the plan of study indicating those courses that are to be used for both degrees.
         
      6. Courses Taken as a Graduate Student at Other Accredited Institutions of Higher Learning
        Subject to the restrictions stated below, credits earned for graduate study at other universities (both domestic and international) may be applied toward an advanced degree.  Only credit hours associated with graduate courses for which grades of B- or better were obtained will be eligible for transfer.  Any additional conditions under which credit transfers may be made are determined by the various departments.
    2. Requirements Applicable to a Master’s Plan of Study
       A minimum of 30 hours of graded credits (69800 and 69900 courses are excluded) are required on a plan of study for a non-thesis option master’s degree.  Fewer than 30 credit hours of coursework may be listed on the plan of study for a thesis option master’s degree, providing there is a total of at least 30 hours of coursework and research credits.    

      A maximum of nine Purdue credit hours of coursework at the 50000- and 60000-level used to satisfy the requirements of one (and only one) Purdue master’s degree may be used on the plan of study for a second Purdue master’s degree. However, if an individual is admitted to a second Ph.D. program and has at least two master’s degrees, a maximum of thirty credits from the master’s degree which was not used toward the individual’s first Ph.D. degree may, with the agreement of the advisory committee, be used toward the second degree.

      Coursework used to satisfy the requirements of a master’s degree from an institution other than Purdue may not be used on a Purdue master’s plan of study. 

    3. Requirements Applicable to a Ph.D. Plan of Study

      Up to 30 credits earned from one (and only one) master’s degree, Educational Specialist degree, or doctoral professional degree may be used on the plan of study for a Doctor of Philosophy degree. For such credits to apply to the doctoral degree program, the number of credits to apply must be noted on the doctoral plan of study.

      Graduate students using nine credits from one Purdue master’s degree toward another Purdue master’s degree may use a maximum of 30 credits from only one of the Purdue master’s degrees toward the Purdue Ph.D. degree.
  2. Filing the Plan of Study

    A plan of study should be submitted for approval as early as is feasible (by the end of the third session for doctoral students and by the end of the first session for master’s students) in the student’s study.  Furthermore, it must be received by the Graduate School, with all advisory committee, department/school, and college signatures, prior to the first day of the academic session of graduation. Students are encouraged to submit their plan at least one month in advance of the start of the session of anticipated graduation to allow ample time for department review and approval. Departments may set and enforce an earlier student submission deadline, if appropriate.

    Students who fail to obtain all department approvals on their plan before the start of the session of anticipated graduation will be assessed a Late Graduation Deadline Fee if they want to remain on the candidate roster for the current term.  Students may be asked to register for the following session to receive the degree. The plan of study will not be approved until all technical conditions have been met, and normally all academic conditions of admission must have been met.  (See Section III-B-1-a-(2).)
     
  3. Course Changes in the Plan of Study

    Course changes to the plan of study must be submitted electronically via myPurdue if the plan of study was submitted electronically. Course changes on a paper plan of study should be requested on the Request for Change to the Plan of Study (G.S. Form 13).  The Graduate School regards the plan of study as an individualized curriculum designed by the advisory committee to assist the student in achieving his or her educational objectives.  Although changes in the plan of study may be necessary, each change requested must be accompanied by a brief rationale in the space provided.  Poor performance in a course is not an appropriate reason for removing a course from the plan of study.  A request for changes in a plan of study must be signed by the student and approved by the major professor, the head of the graduate program, and the college dean (if requested by the college).
     
  4. Fulfilling the Plan of Study Course Requirements

    Graduate courses taken while registered as a graduate student at Purdue University may be considered for fulfilling the plan of study requirements only if the student has received grades of C- or better.  These course grades must meet departmental requirements, such as limits on the number of C-, C, or C+ grades permitted, grades of A, A-, B, or B- in certain courses, and/or minimum GPA for courses on the plan of study.  For courses at the 30000- or 40000- level taken as a graduate student or courses that represent either undergraduate excess credit or transfer credit, grades of B- or better are required for fulfilling plan of study requirements.  Once again, departments and advisory committees may set higher standards.  (See Sections VII-B-1-a-(3) and (4) for other conditions governing the use of undergraduate excess and transfer credit on a plan of study.)

    Courses taken as pass/not pass or satisfactory/unsatisfactory are unacceptable on plans of study.  Research credits (69800 and 69900) cannot be included on a plan of study. Except in cases of a staff error, grade option changes will not be approved by the Graduate School.  It is expected that staff errors will be detected early and corrections requested within the normal drop/add period.


C. Theses

A master’s thesis or Ph.D. dissertation (hereafter referred to in this section as thesis) is a document authored by an individual, describing results of original research undertaken by that individual, and asserting a position that individual is willing to defend.  Joint or collaborative research endeavors are not prohibited; however, in such situations, unique aspects of the broad problem are to be explored by each individual, and the thesis written and presented to the final examining committee is to be a document describing the student’s creative effort and contribution.

All theses must be prepared according to both departmental format requirements (available in departmental graduate offices) and University format requirements, as described in A Manual for the Preparation of Graduate Theses.  In addition to stating the University format requirements, established by the Graduate School, this manual delineates regulations concerning the use of copyrighted material in a thesis.  In addition, copyrighted software may not be used without permission, and its use must be acknowledged.

University format requirements include:  1) font style and size; 2) spacing; 3) margins; 4) pagination; 5) title page; 6) abstract; and 7) electronic submission guidelines (master’s thesis and Ph.D. dissertation candidates).  Format of candidate theses is reviewed by the staff in the Thesis/Dissertation Office, Room B-80, Young Hall, prior to the final thesis deposit appointment. 

Departmental format requirements cover such matters as how figures are prepared and numbered; style of references; placement of notes; headings; chapter headings, etc.  Departments have chosen either to adopt format requirements that will help students learn the stylistic requirements extant in their own field or they have chosen to adopt the “Purdue Format,” as detailed in A Manual for the Preparation of Graduate Theses. 

All matters of manuscript style not covered by the University format requirements are addressed in the departmental requirements.  If there is overlap between departmental style specifications and University format requirements, the University requirements must be satisfied.  The departmental format requirements are checked in the department either by an individual(s) who has been designated as thesis format advisor or by the chair of the student’s examining committee, whichever method has been chosen by the department and filed with the Graduate School.  Departments must keep the Graduate School informed of any change in the method of format checking and the current names of thesis format advisors, and this information is listed online at the Thesis/Dissertation Office website.

A first draft of the thesis should, ideally, be in the hands of the major professor at least six weeks before the end of the session in which conferral of the degree is expected.

A copy of the thesis must be submitted to the major professor at least three weeks before the end of the session in which the degree is to be conferred.  The thesis must bear the written approval of the professor who has directed the research before it is submitted to the final examining committee.  Each member of the examining committee must receive a copy of the thesis at least two weeks before the date of the final oral examination.

After the examining committee meets, the student prepares a final copy of the thesis or dissertation.  That copy, called the “deposit” copy, incorporates all revisions requested by the members of the examining committee.  Master’s and doctoral students will submit their deposit copies in electronic form via the Purdue Electronic Thesis Deposit (ETD) website at least one business day prior to their scheduled deposit appointment.

A final copy of the thesis should be provided to both the major professor and the head of the graduate program.

Upon successful deposit of their theses, degree candidates are provided their Thesis/ Dissertation Receipt (G.S. Form 16) from the Thesis/Dissertation Office.  The thesis deposit receipt must be issued by the Thesis/Dissertation Office to degree candidates no later than the close of business (5:00 p.m. Eastern time) on the last day of classes of the session in which their degree is to be awarded.

A thesis may be held in confidential status for a limited period of time. (See Section VII-J.)


D. Establishing Examining Committees

All examining committees are established following the same procedures. Preliminary and final examining committees may or may not be identical to the advisory committee. The Request for Appointment of Examining Committee (G.S. Form 8), must be submitted electronically via myPurdue for all students at the West Lafayette campus. Regional campus practices may vary. All Form 8 requests must be signed by the advisory committee chair and the exam form head and must be received by the Graduate School at least two weeks prior to the proposed examination date, to allow the Graduate School time to process the Request for Appointment of Examining Committee (G.S. Form 8). In some cases, this two week period may be needed to give the dean of the Graduate School adequate time to appoint and arrange for additional members, if he or she wishes. (Departmental deadlines may be earlier.)  Final examinations must be held before the last week of classes.

Because it is crucial for advisory committee members to bring independent thought and decision-making to their advisory committee roles, the Graduate School strongly recommends that major professors, graduate students, and other individuals involved in the advisory committee selection process strive to avoid appointments where there may be potential conflicts of interest. Advisory committee appointments of spouses/partners, partners in business, or those with financial conflicts of interest connected to the graduate student, for example, should be carefully reviewed and alternatives considered.

  1. Non-thesis Option Master’s Degree

    If the student’s department requires a final examination for a non-thesis master’s degree, the examining committee usually will be identical to the advisory committee, in which case, no additional request for appointment of a committee is required.  If, however, the examining committee is to be different from the advisory committee (e.g., when a committee member is unable to serve), appointment of a committee of at least three graduate faculty must be requested in the usual manner, by submitting a Request for Appointment of Examining Committee (G.S. Form 8) electronically via myPurdue, or through the link on the Graduate School homepage under forms.

    If the graduate program has been approved to use the One-Member Advisory Committee Flexibility option, but does not have approval to use the Alternative Graduation Criteria option, the Master’s Final Examination Report Form (G.S. Form 7), must still be submitted.

  2. Thesis Option Master’s Degree
    The final examining committee must be composed of at least three members of the graduate faculty and may or may not be identical to the advisory committee. Members of the committee need not be faculty with whom the student has taken coursework, however, at least 51% of the committee members must have regular graduate faculty certification.
     
  3. Doctoral Qualifying Examinations
    Departments may require their doctoral students to complete qualifying or mastery examinations at various stages between admission and the preliminary examination.  These examinations do not require Graduate School authorization, nor are the results to be reported to the Graduate School.
     
  4. Doctoral Preliminary Examinations

    To become eligible to take the preliminary examination, the student must have an approved plan of study, satisfactorily completed most of the formal study, and satisfied any world language requirements.  Satisfactory completion of any world language requirement is monitored and determined by the department.  The examination should be scheduled as soon as possible and must be completed with at least two sessions of registration (including summer session) before the date of the doctoral final examination. For example, a doctoral student who passes the preliminary examination during a spring session is not eligible to take the final examination (provided that the student is registered for the subsequent summer session and fall session) before the following spring session. The Graduate Council recommends that full-time graduate students take the preliminary examination by the end of their third year of graduate study.  Departments are encouraged to add the recommendation that full-time doctoral students take preliminary examinations by the end of their third year to departmental graduate handbooks.


    The preliminary examining committee must consist of a minimum of three members of the graduate faculty.  At least 51% of the committee members must have regular graduate faculty certification. All members of the examining committee are to be notified of the scheduled examination.  Other faculty members may be requested by any member of the examining committee to participate, without vote, in the examination, and any interested faculty member may be present, without vote.  Although only three committee members are required, if the committee has four or more members, a single member may withhold his or her signature of approval.

    A preliminary examination passed by a student whose graduate study and/or professional activity has been inactive for five years or more is invalid. (See Section III-B-5 .)
     
  5. Doctoral Final Examinations
    At least two academic sessions of registration devoted to research and writing must elapse between the preliminary and final doctoral examinations.  For instance, a doctoral student who passes the preliminary examination in a summer session is eligible to take the final examination (provided that the student is registered the following fall and spring sessions) beginning with the following summer session.

    After the research has been completed and the thesis written and presented to the committee, a final oral examination must be held in which the candidate defends the thesis and demonstrates to the examining committee, consisting of a minimum of four members, the capabilities for which the Ph.D. degree is to be awarded. Final examinations must be held before the last week of classes. 

    Departments, schools, or programs should announce final doctoral examinations so that interested persons may attend.  In instances when classified or proprietary information will be discussed, the major professor may exclude external participants who are not members of the examining committee.

    When the Request for Appointment of Examining Committee (G.S. Form 8) is approved by the Graduate School, an electronic examination report form will be automatically released to the examining committee for use in reporting the results of the examination.

E. Conducting Examinations

The Graduate Council has recommended that oral examinations not last more than two hours.  If additional time is needed, the examination may be continued at a later date.

If the situation warrants, and it is agreeable with the members of the examining committee and the candidate, one member of the examining committee, or even the candidate, may participate in the examination via electronic media. 

  1. Non-thesis Option Master’s Degree
    The final examining committee may conduct an oral examination, administer a written examination, or conduct a conference in the absence of the student.  Departments may waive the examination process entirely by receiving approval to use the Alternative Graduation Criteria option. (See Section VII-F-2.)
  2. Thesis Option Master’s Degree
    The final examination is usually an oral examination in which the student defends the thesis; however, the examining committee shall set procedures for the examination.
  3. Doctoral Preliminary Examination
    The written as well as the oral preliminary examination will be conducted by the examining committee.  In some cases, responsibility for the written examination is delegated to certain other faculty, but the final responsibility for the examination rests with the examining committee.
  4. Doctoral Final Examination
    The examining committee shall set procedures for the examination.

F. Reporting the Results of Examinations

At the conclusion of an examination, the examining committee chair should electronically present the examination committee with the appropriate examination report form.  This report should be completed and signed without delay for prompt submission to the Graduate School.  In the case of a final examination, the report must be received by the Graduate School before the last week of classes of the academic session in which graduation is expected. After a satisfactory examination involving a thesis defense, committee members who approve the thesis must sign a Thesis Acceptance (G.S. Form 9).

The members of the examining committee may wish to review the deposit copy prior to signing the Thesis Acceptance (G.S. Form 9).  Once a committee member has signed the Thesis Acceptance (G.S. Form 9), the document is approved by that individual. A signature either by the thesis format advisor or the examining committee chair (depending on the procedural decision made by the department) indicating that the departmental format requirements have been met is required on the Thesis Acceptance (G.S. Form 9).

  1. Report of the Final Examination for the Master’s Degree
    The exact degree title must be designated on the Report of Master’s Examining Committee (G.S. Form 7).   Committee certification for a master’s degree requires that all members of a three-person committee concur that the student has satisfactorily completed the examination (with the exception of departments with an approved one-member flexibility option). Although only three committee members are required, if the committee has four or more members, a single member may withhold his or her signature of approval.

    If the examination is unsatisfactory, a candidate must wait at least until the following session to repeat the final examination. A new electronic Request for Appointment of Examining Committee (G.S. Form 8) must be submitted.
     
  2. Alternative Graduation Criteria for Non-thesis Master’s Degrees
    A department may elect not to submit final examination reports for its students who are candidates for non-thesis, coursework only, master’s degrees. It is suggested that departments use this option that have such a group of students, who complete degree requirements by taking a certain number of credits (minimum of 30) and meet certain other basic departmental requirements to earn the degree.  For example, this could be 30 credits of coursework, at least a 3.0 GPA on the plan of study, or no grade less than (department to decide). Satisfaction of these criteria will be monitored jointly by the department and the Graduate School as part of the graduation audit/certification process.

    To use this option, a request must be submitted to the Graduate Records Manager in the Graduate School.  This request must specify the departmental requirements required for the non-thesis master’s degree.
     
  3. Report of the Doctoral Preliminary Examination
    It is the responsibility of the examining committee to determine whether the student is qualified and ready to undertake or continue research and proceed toward the Ph.D. degree.  The committee should report the examination as “satisfactory” or “unsatisfactory” by completing the Report of Preliminary Examination (G.S. Form 10) immediately following the examination.

    If the report is unsatisfactory, the examining committee may recommend that the student be permitted to request a second examination by submitting a Request for Appointment of Examining Committee (G.S. Form 8).  The student must wait at least until the following session (including summer session) to repeat the examination.  Should the preliminary examination be failed twice, the student may not be given a third examination, except upon the recommendation of the examining committee and with special approval of the dean of the Graduate School.

    A student who transfers to Purdue with his or her major professor, has passed the preliminary examination that qualifies a doctoral student for candidacy and been admitted to candidacy at the previous institution, may request that the student’s advisory committee (with endorsement of the head of the graduate program) petition the dean of the Graduate School to admit the student to candidacy at Purdue.  The petition must include a completed Report of the Preliminary Examination (G.S. Form 10), which can be obtained from the Graduate School, a description of the candidacy examination at the previous institution, and the committee’s analysis of that examination that led to the request.
     
  4. Report of the Doctoral Final Examination

    At the completion of the final examination, the committee chair should present the examination committee with a Report of the Final Examination (G.S. Form 11), which is sent to the department by the Graduate School upon approval of the request for an examining committee.  Each member of the examining committee must indicate approval or disapproval and sign the report form.  Only members of the approved examining committee may take part in the evaluation.  No more than one dissenting vote is acceptable in certifying a candidate to receive the Ph.D. degree.

    If the examination is unsatisfactory, a candidate must wait at least until the following session (including summer session) to repeat the final examination.  A Request for Appointment of Examining Committee (G.S. Form 8) must be submitted.


G. Depositing the Completed Thesis/Dissertation

In-person final thesis deposit appointments are mandatory, scheduled meetings unless alternate arrangements are made with the Thesis/Dissertation Office. Final deposit appointments are conducted with candidates or their designated proxies. Candidates who are unable to visit the Thesis/Dissertation Office in Young Hall, for final deposit appointments (e.g., they reside in another state or country) may arrange for “long-distance deposits” with the Thesis/Dissertation Office on the provision they do so in advance and they ensure all of their required items are received and approved by 5 p.m. Eastern time on the deadline date of the session in which they wish to graduate. For most candidates, final deposit appointments are scheduled events at which time they report to the Graduate School to hand in their required forms, ask questions, and obtain answers to administrative questions of interest to them.  Candidates must provide all materials described and requested in the final thesis deposit checklist, which is linked on the Thesis/Dissertation Office website. Thesis deposit appointments are made by candidates using the self-scheduling link on the home page of the Thesis/Dissertation Office website.

Master’s theses and doctoral dissertations are reviewed as electronic PDF documents after online submission by candidates to the Thesis/Dissertation Office (Room B-80, Young Hall).  Following their successful final defense examination, and after approval of all post-defense revisions by their department, candidates will submit their finalized theses or dissertations as PDF documents via the Purdue ETD website. ETDs will be submitted for review and approval by the Thesis/Dissertation Office no later than one business day prior to their scheduled deposit appointment. Candidates will also ensure that a typed PDF version of their Thesis Acceptance (G.S. Form 9) is correctly completed and attached to the front of their electronic thesis submissions.  Candidates are strongly advised to submit their ETDs and deposit in a timely fashion to ensure they meet the Graduate School deadline and avoid unforeseen changes to their graduation plans.

The Graduate School only accepts ETDs for deposit. Hardbound printed copies are no longer required as part of the deposit process except in cases of confidentiality. Candidates are still responsible for providing any hard or soft (e.g., CD-Rom) copies required by their departments. Candidates should therefore consult with their departments regarding their internal needs.

All master’s and doctoral degree thesis-option candidates will be issued a Thesis/Dissertation Receipt (G.S. Form 16) by the Thesis/Dissertation Office at the time of their successful deposit. This form confirms Graduate School acceptance of candidate materials. The Thesis/Dissertation Receipt (G.S. Form 16) will be delivered to the student and also to the student’s department, via PDF attachment, no later than the close of business (5 p.m., Eastern time) on the deposit deadline date. A PDF of this form will also be provided to the Office of Graduate Records for uploading into Banner.

Candidates desiring to make post-deposit edits to their theses and dissertations must complete a fully justified Request for Post-Facto Edit (G.S. Form 37) and provide it to the Thesis/Dissertation Office as soon as possible after the discrepancy is noted. This form must be approved by appropriate faculty in the student’s department and also approved by a dean of the Graduate School. Candidates requesting edits will also be subject to the Late Graduation Deadline Fee (LGDF). Students may request a waiver of their fees with appeals, subject to approval by the Graduate School LGDF waiver committee.  Candidates are only permitted one approved post-facto request for each document they wish to edit.


H. Thesis Deposit Fee

Effective Fall 2013, a thesis deposit fee is charged to masters and doctoral thesis-option students after their successful deposits. The fee, as of Spring 2015, is $90 for master’s and $125 for doctoral students. The Thesis/Dissertation Office will upload the thesis deposit fee attribute into Banner after the student successfully deposits. Students at Calumet and Fort Wayne will pay their fees through their local bursars. IUPUI students will receive a paper bill from the West Lafayette Bursar. The thesis deposit fee must be paid in a timely manner to avoid a Bursar encumbrance on the student’s academic record and transmission delay of the student’s thesis to ProQuest Information & Learning for publication.

As of Spring 2015, there are no other mandatory fees connected with the thesis deposit process. Student submission of their electronic thesis deposit and posting of their document into Purdue e-Pubs are both free of charge. Candidates who request optional services offered by ProQuest (e.g., Open Access, copyright registration, and hard copy print orders) will pay for these services directly to ProQuest via secure online credit card transaction.


I. Survey of Earned Doctorates and Graduate School Exit Questionnaires

Doctoral candidate completion of the Survey of Earned Doctorates (conducted by the National Opinion Research Center of the University of Chicago) is mandatory for West Lafayette and IUPUI doctoral candidates. Candidates will find the survey linked on the Thesis/Dissertation Office website.  Responses to the SED provide important data for statistical studies by federal agencies conducting studies of national trends in doctoral education and of human capital supply and demand.  Such studies may influence the funding of research and doctoral fellowships.  The SED certificate of completion, or e-mail notification of completion, will be presented to the Thesis/Dissertation Office at the time of final deposit and must be received before doctoral candidates can be issued their Thesis/Dissertation Receipt (G.S. Form 16).

Completion of the Graduate School Exit Questionnaire for West Lafayette master’s and doctoral candidates is also mandatory. Regional campus candidates are not required to complete the questionnaire. This questionnaire may be completed at any time during the session in which students have declared their intent to graduate. Students are assured that their answers are maintained confidentially in the Graduate School.  The trend data, however, is distributed to departments and is useful in strengthening Purdue graduate programs. Master’s and Ph.D. candidates must submit proof of completion, either in the form of an online certificate of completion or notification e-mail, to the Thesis/Dissertation Office prior to receipt of their Thesis/Dissertation Receipt (G.S. Form 16).


J. Certifying and Depositing Confidential Theses

If a thesis contains proprietary information or other information that should be withheld temporarily from the public domain, a Request for Confidentiality of Thesis (G.S. Form 15) must be completed and submitted to the Thesis/Dissertation Office during the final deposit appointment.  The form must be signed by the student, the major professor, and the head of the graduate program.

In addition to their ETD submissions, master’s and Ph.D. candidates must deliver an approved Request for Confidentiality of Thesis (G.S. Form 15) and their departmental library copy (if still required), as indicated in the online final deposit checklist to the Thesis/Dissertation Office, Room B-80, Young Hall.   

As with any other thesis or dissertation, degree candidates and their departments will be provided a Thesis/Dissertation Receipt (G.S. Form 16) via PDF attachment, after their successful deposit. A copy of the receipt will also be provided to the Office of Graduate Records for uploading into Banner.

The initial period of confidentiality normally granted is for one year.  Extensions for up to an additional year may be requested but require the approval of the Thesis/Dissertation Office. In cases where the sponsoring organization has a contractual arrangement, which expressly stipulates a longer time period of confidentiality with Purdue University and/or the Purdue Research Foundation, a two-year initial period of confidentiality may be requested with the endorsement of Sponsored Program Services. 

The Thesis/Dissertation Office will retain the ETD copy of the thesis in its secure electronic holding queue during the period of confidentiality. The departmental copy (if still required) will also be maintained in the Graduate School.  Access to these copies prior to release will not be permitted without authorization in writing by the author, the major professor, or the head of the graduate program, and the endorsement of the dean of the Graduate School.  At the end of the approved period of confidentiality, the thesis will be automatically removed from such status unless a request for extension is approved by the Thesis/Dissertation Office.  Earlier removal from confidentiality may be authorized in the same manner as access during confidentiality.

After release, the hard copy will be forwarded to the department, updated information about the work will be entered by the libraries into its online catalog and also into e-Pubs, and the author’s ETD will be removed from the “holding queue” and transmitted to ProQuest Information and Learning for publication.


K. Multiple Degrees

  1. Master’s Degrees

    A student may earn more than one Purdue master’s degree.  The student must meet the requirements for each master’s degree program, and there can be a maximum of nine Purdue credit hours (at the 50000- and 60000-level) of overlap of coursework from one plan of study to another.  Coursework from only one Purdue master’s degree may be used to partially satisfy Ph.D. degree requirements.

  2. Ph.D. Degrees

    Although the Graduate School discourages the admission of students who hold a Ph.D. degree from any institution for a second Ph.D. degree, it recognizes that there may be special circumstances in which such an admission is appropriate.  Such decisions can be made at the level of the departmental graduate committee and will be processed like other recommendations for admission that come to the Graduate School. (See Section III-B-10.)