May 26, 2018  
2017-2018 University Catalog 
    
2017-2018 University Catalog

General Information



About Purdue

About

Purdue University, a top public research institution, offers higher education at its highest proven value. Committed to affordability, the University has frozen tuition and most fees at 2012-13 levels. Committed to student success, Purdue is changing the student experience with greater focus on faculty-student interaction and creative use of technology. Committed to pursuing scientific discoveries and engineered solutions, Purdue has streamlined pathways for faculty and student innovators who have a vision for moving the world forward.

About Purdue Website


Accreditation

Office of Institutional Assessment

In the United States, academic institutions and programs use accreditation to ensure that they are meeting established standards of educational quality. Accreditation is a voluntary process of self-reflection and peer review that helps institutions to identify opportunities and challenges throughout the university.

Institutional Accreditation

There are two types of accreditation, institutional and specialized. Institutional accreditors, often referred to as “regional” accreditors, examine a college or university as a whole. Purdue University has been accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools (HLC-NCA) since 1913. Our most recent accreditation visit was in March of 2010.

The HLC’s new Open Pathway for maintaining accreditation seeks to offer greater value to institutions by focusing on both an assurance of quality and an engagement in continuous improvement. Two Assurance Reviews will take place in the ten-year cycle. One in Year 4 through an online reporting system and one in Year 10 that couples the online assurance report with a campus visit. In addition, our campus will complete a Quality Initiative between Years 5 and 9 focused on institutional innovation and improvement suited to our needs and circumstances.

Specialized Accreditation

Specialized accreditors evaluate specific educational programs. Professional accreditors, such as those for business, engineering, and other technical areas, fall into this category. For a list of programs at Purdue University with specialized accreditation, click here.

Specialized Accreditation

 

 

 

 

 

 


Board of Trustees, Officers of Administration and Instruction

Current Board of Trustees

Name City Term
Sonny Beck Atlanta, IN 2013-2019
Michael Berghoff (Chairman) Indianapolis, IN 2009-2018
JoAnn Brouillette West Lafayette, IN 2006-2018
Vanessa Castagna Dallas, TX 2013-2018
Malcolm DeKryger Demotte, IN 2016-2019
Michael Klipsch Carmel, IN 2015-2017
Gary Lehman Lafayette, IN 2010-2017
Cameron Mann Cloverdale, IN 2015-2017
Thomas Spurgeon, (Vice Chairman) Peoria, IL 2005-2017
Don Thompson Chicago, IL 2009-2019

If you wish to send an email message to a trustee, please direct it to trustees@purdue.edu.

Board Officers

Former Trustees

Chairmen

 

Faculty Senate

Please visit the University Senate to learn about the Faculty Senate Chair, meetings and minutes, committees and bylaws.

Faculty Senate Current Members

 

The President’s Office

Mitchell E. Daniels, Jr. Biography

Mitchell E. Daniels, Jr. was unanimously selected by the Purdue Board of Trustees on Thursday, June 21, 2012, to be the university’s 12th president. Daniels assumed that role in January 2013, at the conclusion of his term as Governor of the State of Indiana.

He was elected as the 49th governor of Indiana in 2004, in his first bid for any elected office. He was reelected in 2008 to a second and final term, receiving more votes than any candidate for any public office in the state’s history.

President Daniels came from a successful career in business and government, holding numerous top management positions in both the private and public sectors. His work as CEO of the Hudson Institute and President of Eli Lilly and Company’s North American Pharmaceutical Operations taught him the business skills he brought to state government. He also served as Chief of Staff to Senator Richard Lugar, Senior Advisor to President Ronald Reagan and Director of the Office of Management and Budget under President George W. Bush.

Daniels’ first legislative success created the public-private Indiana Economic Development Corporation to replace a failing state bureaucracy in the mission of attracting new jobs. In its first four years of existence, the agency broke all previous records for new jobs in the state and was associated with more than $18 billion of new investment. In 2008, Site Selection Magazine and CNBC both named Indiana as the Most Improved State for Business in the country. In 2012, Indiana became the 23rd Right-to-Work state. Indiana is now near the top of every national ranking of business attractiveness and is the top job-creating state in the nation.

On his first day in office, Governor Daniels created the first Office of Management and Budget to look for efficiencies and cost savings across state government. In 2005, he led the state to its first balanced budget in eight years and, without a tax increase, transformed the nearly $800 million deficit he inherited into an annual surplus of $370 million within a year. The governor also repaid hundreds of millions of dollars the state had borrowed from Indiana’s public schools, state universities and local units of government in previous administrations, and reduced the state’s overall debt by 40 percent. The second biennial budget replicated this fiscal discipline and built reserves equal to 10 percent of annual spending. Today Indiana has a AAA credit rating (the first in state history) and the fewest state employees per capita in the U.S.

During his first term, Governor Daniels spearheaded a host of reforms aimed at improving the performance of state government. These changes and a strong emphasis on performance measurement have led to many state agencies, including the Bureau of Motor Vehicles, Department of Child Services and Department of Correction winning national awards.

Governor Daniels’ innovations include the 2006 lease of the Indiana Toll Road. This is the largest privatization of public infrastructure in the United States and generated nearly $4 billion for Major Moves, the state’s record-breaking 10-year transportation and infrastructure program. The Healthy Indiana Plan was enacted in 2007 to provide healthcare coverage for uninsured Hoosier adults, and comprehensive property tax reforms in 2008 resulted in the biggest tax cut in Indiana history. Today Indiana has the lowest property taxes in the nation. Both initiatives received overwhelming bipartisan support.

In 2011, under his guidance, Indiana passed the most sweeping education reforms in the country. Because of these reforms, Indiana is dramatically expanding charter schools, providing parents with more school choice, revising teacher evaluations and expanding full-day kindergarten funding. In 2010, he established WGU Indiana, a partnership between the state and Western Governors University aimed at expanding access to higher education for Hoosiers and increasing the percentage of the state’s adult population with education beyond high school.

Many organizations have recognized the governor’s leadership. In October 2010, Daniels received The Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation’s inaugural Medal for Distinguished Service to Education for his efforts to reform education. In January 2011, the governor was one of three recipients selected to receive the first-ever Fiscy Award, presented for leadership and commitment to responsible financial stewardship by the non-partisan Fiscy Awards Committee. Daniels also received the “2011 Friend of the Family Award” from the Indiana Family Institute, which recognized him for his strong record of pro-family, pro-life and pro-faith actions taken as Indiana’s chief executive. In May 2012, the Manhattan Institute presented the governor with its Alexander Hamilton Award for his achievements in state government; including healthcare improvements, landmark education reforms and fiscal responsibility.

The governor’s conservation efforts have set aside record acreages of protected wetlands and wildlife habitats. In March 2011, Daniels was a recipient of the Wetland Conservation Achievement Award from the national conservation organization, Ducks Unlimited, for “making land conservation a top priority and for preserving thousands of invaluable acres across the state for future generations.” In January 2012, he received the Chancellor Award for Conservation and Wildlife Protection from the Weatherby Foundation and in March 2012, he also was awarded the Theodore Roosevelt Award from the Indiana Wildlife Federation. His efforts earned him the nickname “The Teddy Roosevelt of Indiana” by the Nature Conservancy.

Daniels received the Woodrow Wilson Award from Princeton University in February 2013. The award recognizes an alumnus whose career embodies the call to duty in Wilson’s famous speech, “Princeton in the Nation’s Service.” The award was presented during Alumni Day activities on February 23, 2013. He was also the recipient in June 2013 of the Bradley Prize from the Milwaukee-based Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation. The award recognizes accomplishments that “strengthen American institutions.” In announcing the prize, the foundation stated that Daniels “established himself as an economic reformer who guided Indiana through the recession with a budget surplus and a firm foundation for economic growth.”

In August 2013, it was announced that Daniels was named the 2013 recipient of the Excellence in Innovation Award by Centric’s Indiana Innovation Network. The award recognizes “those individuals and organizations who are successfully leading the innovation charge in their state.”

In February 2013, Daniels was asked to co-chair a National Research Council committee to review and make recommendations on the future of the U.S. human spaceflight program. The appointment to the Committee on Human Spaceflight runs through June 30, 2014. In March 2013, Daniels was elected to the board of Energy Systems Network (ESN), Indiana’s industry-driven clean technology initiative.

Daniels, who is also the author of the best-selling book “Keeping the Republic: Saving America by Trusting Americans,” earned a bachelor’s degree from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University in 1971, and his law degree from Georgetown University in 1979.

Governor Daniels and his wife Cheri have four daughters: Meagan, Melissa, Meredith and Maggie.

Please visit the Office of the President for more information.

 

The Provost’s Office

The Office of the Provost is committed to promoting academic excellence at Purdue. The provost and vice president for academic affairs is Purdue’s chief academic officer, reporting directly to the president. The provost is responsible for:

  1. All academic programs
  2. Academic strategy and priorities
  3. Faculty-related matters (including academic appointments, tenure and promotion)
  4. Student academic affairs

The provost works closely with the deans of all colleges and schools to ensure effective collaboration and inspire new areas of scholarship. He also has direct responsibility for academic support units including diversity and inclusion, enrollment management, financial affairs, and the libraries. The provost collaborates with the chief financial officer and has responsibility for the allocation of financial resources in accordance with academic priorities. The provost also communicates on academic and faculty matters with a wide variety of internal and external constituencies, including the Board of Trustees.

Office of the Provost

 


Equal Access/Equal Opportunity

Nondiscrimination Policy Statement

Purdue University is committed to maintaining a community which recognizes and values the inherent worth and dignity of every person; fosters tolerance, sensitivity, understanding, and mutual respect among its members; and encourages each individual to strive to reach his or her own potential. In pursuit of its goal of academic excellence, the University seeks to develop and nurture diversity. The University believes that diversity among its many members strengthens the institution, stimulates creativity, promotes the exchange of ideas, and enriches campus life.

Purdue University views, evaluates, and treats all persons in any University related activity or circumstance in which they may be involved, solely as individuals on the basis of their own personal abilities, qualifications, and other relevant characteristics.

Purdue University prohibits discrimination against any member of the University community on the basis of race, religion, color, sex, age, national origin or ancestry, genetic information, marital status, parental status, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, disability, or status as a veteran. The University will conduct its programs, services and activities consistent with applicable federal, state and local laws, regulations and orders and in conformance with the procedures and limitations as set forth in Purdue’s Equal Opportunity, Equal Access and Affirmative Action policy which provides specific contractual rights and remedies. Additionally, the University promotes the full realization of equal employment opportunity for women, minorities, persons with disabilities and veterans through its affirmative action program.

Any question of interpretation regarding this Nondiscrimination Policy Statement shall be referred to the Vice President for Ethics and Compliance for final determination.


FERPA

Information For Students & Parents at Purdue University

FERPA Regulations: http://www.purdue.edu/policies/records/viiia4.html

What rights do students have under FERPA?

  • The right to inspect and review their education records within 45 days of their request
  • The right to request an amendment to their education records
  • The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in their education records
  • The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures to comply with FERPA

“Legitimate Educational Interest”

A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility.

Public Posting of Grades

The public posting of grades, either by the student’s name, institutional student identification number, or social security number is a violation of FERPA. Using an assigned random number that only the student and instructor know would be an appropriate way to post grades. Even then, the order of posting should not be alphabetic.

What is directory information?

Institutions may disclose the following information on a student without violating FERPA if the student has not restricted their information.

  • name
  • e-mail address
  • address (local & home)
  • telephone number (local & home)
  • college/school and curriculum
  • enrollment status and credit hour load
  • dates of attendance
  • classification
  • receipt or non-receipt of a degree
  • academic awards received (dean’s list, honors students)
  • participation in officially recognized activities
  • sports photograph
  • position, weight, and height of athletes

Indiana SSN Law

Internal use of SSN information within the Purdue system for the purpose of conducting normal business is still permitted under the Indiana law. However, it is important to remember that Purdue data handling guidelines address the usage and methods of exchanging sensitive and restricted data, in addition to just SSN information. These guidelines can be found at: https://www.purdue.edu/securepurdue/procedures/dataHandling1.html

What are education records?

An education record is any record that is directly related to a student and maintained by the university. A student has the right of access to these records.

Education records include any records in whatever medium (handwritten, email, print, magnetic tape, film, diskette, etc.) that is in the possession of any school official. This includes transcripts or other records obtained from a school in which a student was previously enrolled.

What aren’t education records?

  • sole possession records or private notes held by school officials that are not accessible or released to other personnel,
  • law enforcement or campus security records that are solely for law enforcement purposes and maintained solely by the law enforcement unit,
  • records relating solely to an individual ’ s employment by the institution that are not available for any other purpose,
  • records relating to treatment provided by a physician, psychiatrist, psychologist or other recognized professional or paraprofessional and disclosed only to individuals providing treatment,
  • records of an institution that contain only information about an individual obtained after that person is no longer a student, i.e., alumni records,
  • grades on peer-graded papers that have not been collected and recorded.

Letters of Recommendation

Statements made by a person making a recommendation that are made from that person’s own observation or knowledge do not require a written release from the student who is the subject of the recommendation. However, if personally identifiable information obtained from a student’s education record is included in a letter of recommendation (grades, GPA, etc.), the writer is required to obtain a signed release from the student which:

  1. specifies the records that may be disclosed,
  2. states the purpose of the disclosure, and
  3. identifies the party or class of parties to whom the disclosure can be made.

Since the letter of recommendation would be part of the student’s education record, the student has the right to read it - unless he/she has waived that right of access.

“Health and Safety” Exception

Institutions may take into consideration circumstances pertaining to the health and safety of a student or other individuals to disclose information from education records without a student’s consent. If the institution determines there is “articulable and significant threat” to the health and safety of the student or others, information from education records can be released “to any person whose knowledge of the situation is necessary to protect” the health and safety of the student or other individuals.

Outsourcing and Access to Education Records

Institutions are allowed to disclose education records without the student’s consent to contractors, volunteers, and other non -employees performing institutional services and functions.

FERPA and Parents’ Access to their Student’s Education Records

  1. When a student reaches the age of 18 or begins attending a postsecondary institution at any age, FERPA rights transfer from the parent to the student.
  2. Parents may obtain non-directory information (grades, GPA, etc.) at the discretion of the institution if the student is a dependent per federal tax law.
  3. Student Information Release Form: Parents may have access to non-directory information by obtaining a signed consent from their child.  This is a one-time form.  A new signed and dated Student Information Release Form is required each time a request for the release of information is made.
  4. MyPurdue Proxy:  A student can give parents, legal guardians, or other trusted parties access to view certain pieces of their student information online. This access is referred to as proxy access, and the person who is granted this authorization is called myPurdue proxy. The student controls the entire process through his/her myPurdue Portal and can add anyone with a valid e-mail address as a proxy

For more information see http://www.purdue.edu/registrar/FERPA/index.html

Call 765-494-6133 or email ferpa@purdue.edu for FERPA assistance.

 


Tuition and Fees

Estimated Cost of Undergraduate Attendance, 2017-2018

A Purdue University Student Invoice is made up of various Tuition & Fees, which make up the total tuition for the University.  The University breaks down specific tuition costs in order to be transparent as to where specific funds are directed and how they are utilized. For tuition and fee rate tables click here.

Below are estimated costs for the 2017-2018 academic year (two semesters of full-time enrollment). Part-time students can find costs by credit hour on the Bursar website.

(All University fees are subject to change without notice.)

West Lafayette Campus
FLAT RATE TUITION FEE - UNDERGRADUATE

8+ Credit Hours
Regular Fall/Spring Per Semester
EFFECTIVE
FALL 2017

For those enrolled.
General Service $4,603.90
Technology Fee $94.10
Repair & Rehabilitation Fee $161.00
Student Fitness & Wellness Fee $122.00
Student Activity Fee $20.00
Total Resident $5,001.00
Nonresident Tuition $9,401.00
Total Nonresident $14,402.00
International Student Tuition $1,000.00
Total International Nonresident $15,402.00

+ Tuition will remain frozen at current rates through the 2018-19 academic year.
**International students are those who hold F, J, and some other visa types
**Some programs have additional fees:
Computer Science - $1,025
Engineering - $1,025
Management - $718
Purdue Polytechnic - $286
Flight - Individual courses in this program have additional fees; please refer to the Bursar website or contact the department for specific flight course fees.
This information is subject to change without notice.
If you enroll in classes but must withdraw before the semester starts, Purdue will refund your tuition/fees. After classes begin, refunds are reduced proportionally. Students who have certain types of federal financial aid are subject to other refund schedules.

Estimated Cost of Graduate Attendance

West Lafayette Campus
FLAT RATE TUITION FEE - GRADUATE

8+ Credit Hours
Regular Fall/Spring Per Semester
EFFECTIVE
FALL 2017


For students enrolled
General Service $4,603.90
Technology Fee $94.10
Repair & Rehabilitation Fee $161.00
Student Fitness & Wellness Fee $122.00
Student Activity Fee $20.00
Total Resident $5,001.00
Nonresident Tuition $9,401.00
Total Nonresident $14,402.00

+ Tuition will remain frozen at current rates through the 2018-19 academic year.
**International students are those who hold F, J, and some other visa types
**Some programs have additional fees:
Computer Science - $562
Engineering - $562
Management - $6,208
Purdue Polytechnic - $286
Flight - Individual courses in this program have additional fees; please refer to the Bursar website or contact the department for specific flight course fees.
This information is subject to change without notice.
If you enroll in classes but must withdraw before the semester starts, Purdue will refund your tuition/fees. After classes begin, refunds are reduced proportionally. Students who have certain types of federal financial aid are subject to other refund schedules.

Estimated Cost of Pharm.D
(All University fees are subject to change without notice.)

West Lafayette Campus
PHARM D;

Regular Fall/Spring Per Semester
(8 hours and above)

EFFECTIVE
FALL 2017


For students enrolled.
General Service $4,603.90
Technology Fee $94.10
Repair & Rehabilitation Fee $161.00
Student Fitness & Wellness Fee $122.00
Student Activity Fee $20.00
Differential General Service $6,012.00
Total Resident $11,013.00
Nonresident Tuition $9,130.00
Total Nonresident $20,143.00

+ Tuition will remain frozen at current rates through the 2018-19 academic year.
**International students are those who hold F, J, and some other visa types
This information is subject to change without notice.
If you enroll in classes but must withdraw before the semester starts, Purdue will refund your tuition/fees. After classes begin, refunds are reduced proportionally. Students who have certain types of federal financial aid are subject to other refund schedules

Estimated Cost of Veterinary Medical Budget

West Lafayette Campus
VETERINARY MEDICINE

(Freshman - Junior)
Regular Fall/Spring Semester
(8 hours and above)

EFFECTIVE
FALL 2017

For students enrolled

General Service $4,603.90
Technology Fee $94.10
Repair & Rehabilitation Fee $161.00
Student Fitness & Wellness Fee $122.00
Student Activity Fee $20.00
Instructional Support Fee $250.00
Differential General Service $4,713.00
Total Resident $9,964.00
Nonresident Tuition $12,414.00
Total Nonresident $22,378.00

 

West Lafayette Campus
VETERINARY MEDICINE

4th Year
Trimester Program
(8 hours and above)
EFFECTIVE
FALL 2017


For students enrolled
General Service $3,375.74
Technology Fee $94.10
Repair & Rehabilitation Fee $161.00
Student Fitness & Wellness Fee $122.00
Student Activity Fee $20.00
Instructional Support Fee $250.00
Differential General Service $3,142.16
Total Resident $7,165.00
Nonresident Tuition $8,291.00
Total Nonresident $15,456.00

+ Tuition will remain frozen at current rates through the 2018-19 academic year.
**International students are those who hold F, J, and some other visa types
This information is subject to change without notice.
If you enroll in classes but must withdraw before the semester starts, Purdue will refund your tuition/fees. After classes begin, refunds are reduced proportionally. Students who have certain types of federal financial aid are subject to other refund schedules.