Oct 23, 2020  
2020-2021 University Catalog 
    
2020-2021 University Catalog

Student Conduct



Students are responsible for observing the policies, rules, and regulations of Purdue University.

These, in general, state the expectation that Purdue students will at all times conduct themselves as responsible citizens. Failure to show respect for duly established civil laws or University regulations will be handled by the Office of the Dean of Students in conformance with the various policies and regulations hereafter stated. The Student Honor Code and the Bill of Student Rights are documents initiated by the students themselves and approved by the faculty and the Board of Trustees for the purpose of indicating both the rights and the responsibilities of students. In the interest of specificity in regulations, the resolution of the Board of Trustees states in detail the kind of serious misconduct for which students are subject to suspension or expulsion from the University and the methods of appealing disciplinary decisions.

This section is followed by other miscellaneous regulations concerning the conduct of students. It is imperative that students become thoroughly familiar with this part of Student Regulations in order to avoid jeopardizing their relationships with the University and to understand fully their responsibility as citizens and members of the University community.


Purdue University Bill of Student Rights

(West Lafayette Campus)

(From Vice President and Treasurer Memo A-16. Board of Trustees, April 30, 1970. Revised by the January 9, 1975, July 10, May 31, 1997.)

Preamble

At an institution of higher learning, the pursuit of knowledge and the attainment of mature attitudes will be greatly facilitated by freedom of expression and decision making as enumerated in the following Bill of Rights. In exercising these rights, however, students must bear the responsibility to act in accordance with local, state, and national laws, and University rules. No right specified by this bill is meant to be construed as enabling students to infringe upon the individual rights of another member of the academic community. We, the students, thereby endorse the Purdue Honor Code and the following Bill of Rights, expecting in all instances to accept these documents with maturity and a level of responsibility that enables the University to retain its academic excellence and to foster an atmosphere conducive to thoughtful and productive individual and collaborative inquiry.

Article 1

The student has the right to accurately and plainly stated information that enables the student to understand clearly:

  1. The general qualifications for establishing and maintaining acceptable academic standing within a particular major and at all other levels within the University.
  2. The graduation requirements for the student’s specific curriculum and major.
  3. The course objectives, requirements, and grading policies set by individual instructors for their courses.

Article 2

Changes in graduation requirements that would delay completion of a student’s program or impose a hardship on the student shall not be applied retroactively. This article shall not apply to professional certification or other requirements imposed from outside the University.

Article 3

A student’s education record or other personally identifiable information except directory information shall not be disseminated outside the University without the student’s consent, except under legal compulsion. Within the University, the use of the student’s education records or other personally identifiable information shall be limited to providing student services. Disciplinary records of a student other than those required to support encumbrances of the academic transcript and/or registration shall be destroyed within five years after the student’s separation from the University.

Article 4

Purdue University recognizes that in the community of scholars there are certain indisputable rights to freedom of inquiry, freedom of thought, and freedom of expression.  The University encourages the search for truth and knowledge and does not abridge searchers’ rights to reveal their findings, by both spoken and written word, even if in so doing they might find themselves at variance with their peers as well as the lay community.  To dissent, to disagree with generally accepted truth and knowledge, is acceptable, and in many ways is essential to free debate and inquiry.  Accordingly, the student shall be free to discuss and express any view relevant to subject matter presented by the instructor or other class members.  However, in exercising this freedom, the student shall not interfere with the academic process of the class by speaking to or behaving towards others in a manner constituting unwelcome, targeted conduct that is so severe, pervasive, and objectively offensive, and that so undermines and detracts from the educational experience of those to whom the speech or behavior is targeted, that the targeted person is effectively denied equal access to the University’s resources and opportunities.

Article 5

The student’s course grade shall be based upon academic performance, and not upon opinions or conduct in matters unrelated to academic standards. The students have the right to discuss and review their academic performance with their instructors. Any student who feels that any course grade has been based upon something other than academic performance has the right to appeal through the University Grade Appeals system.

Article 6

Within the limitations generally accepted for proprietary and collaborative work, and those imposed by the relevant standards of academic honesty, the student has the right to freedom of inquiry, to exchange findings and recommendations, and consistent with applicable University regulations, to publish. No publication by a student shall imply University endorsement.

Article 7

A student, student group, or student organization has the right to distribute written or electronic material on campus without prior approval, providing such distribution is consistent with appropriate regulations concerning the time, place, and manner of distribution and does not interfere with University activities. The student press shall be free of censorship or pressure aimed at controlling editorial policy or staff appointments or removals. The editors and managers shall not be arbitrarily suspended because of student, faculty, administrative, alumni, or community disapproval of editorial policy or content. The same freedom shall be assured oral statements or views on an institution-controlled and student-operated radio or television station. Such editorial freedom entails a corollary obligation under the canons of responsible journalism, applicable regulations of the Federal Communications Commission, and their station constitution or activity guidelines. All student communications shall explicitly state on the editorial page or in broadcast that the opinions expressed are not necessarily those of the University or of the student body.

Article 8

The student has the right to freedom from unlawful discrimination on the basis of race, gender, religion, color, age, national origin or ancestry, disability, marital status, parental status, sexual orientation, or status as a military veteran. A perceived violation of these principles shall be the basis for a grievance procedure with the Campus Appeals Board.

Article 9

Students should have clearly defined means to participate in the formation of University policy affecting academic and student affairs. Student representation on University committees shall be provided wherever appropriate as a mode of student participation. In any case, University committees, when appropriate, should schedule and announce hearings at which representatives of the Purdue Student Government, Purdue Graduate Student Government, student organizations, and individual students as well, can present oral or written statements as effective to the committee deliberations.

Article 10

Students living in University-operated housing shall have the right to share equally in the establishment, modification, and enforcement of residential rules and regulations. Such right shall be exercised through their residential student organizations in cooperation with appropriate University administration. The landlord-tenant rights and responsibilities of both parties shall be recognized as shall all law bearing on such relationships. A perceived violation of this right shall be the basis for a grievance procedure with the Campus Appeals Board.

Article 11

The student has the right to freedom from illegal search and seizure. No contractual arrangement with the University shall be interpreted as waiving this right.

Article 12

Any group of students may become a recognized Purdue student organization by registration with the University in accordance with the provision of University regulations. Any appeal of a University decision to discontinue or refuse recognition of a student group shall be made through the Campus Appeals Board.

Article 13

Any student group recognized as a Purdue student organization shall be entitled to the use of available University facilities in conformity with regulations. Recognition shall not imply University endorsement of group goals and activities.

Article 14

Any recognized Purdue student organization or any group of students that is able to secure sponsorship by a recognized student organization and that is able to demonstrate financial responsibility has the right to present speakers of its choice to address members of the University community using appropriate University facilities. These assemblies shall be subject to regulations necessary to prevent space and time conflicts and to protect the operations of the University and the safety of persons or property.

Article 15

Freedom of assembly shall be guaranteed to all members of the University community. Such assemblies shall be consistent with University regulations regarding the time, place, and conduct of such assemblies.

Article 16

Every student and recognized student organization has the right to substantive and procedural fair play in the administration of discipline and the imposition of academic sanctions. This requires that in all situations the student be informed of the nature of the charges, that the student be given an opportunity to refute them, and that the institution not be arbitrary in its actions.

Article 17

The student who violates civil law may incur penalties prescribed by civil authorities. Only where the University’s interests as an academic community are distinct from those of the general community should the special authority of the University be asserted.

Article 18

It is the right of every student to exercise freely full rights as a citizen. Any student may participate in off-campus activities singly or with any group provided that no claim is made that the student represents the University.

Article 19

This Bill of Student Rights is a reaffirmation by the entire University community that the constitutional guarantees and the basic principles of fair treatment and respect for the integrity, judgment, and contribution of the individual student, coinciding with each student’s freedom to learn set forth in the foregoing articles, are essential to the proper operation of an institution of higher learning. Accordingly, in the interpretation and enforcement of the policies, rules, and regulations of Purdue University, these student rights shall be preserved and given effect, but they shall not be construed or applied so as to limit the rights guaranteed students under the Constitution of the United States or the Constitution of the state of Indiana.

Whenever a student or a group of students claims that these rights have been violated and that the student or group of students has been or will be adversely affected thereby, and such complaint is not resolved informally by the interested parties, it may be presented to an appropriate body of the campus appeals system. Through this system, an appropriate board or committee shall have the power and duty to hear the interested parties and to make findings on complaints within its jurisdiction. In case of grade appeals, the University Grade Appeals Committees shall have final authority. In all other cases, the Campus Appeals Board shall submit recommendations to the president of the University; provided that all such claims that arise out of or are connected with alleged misconduct for which disciplinary proceedings have been instituted shall be presented and determined in such proceedings. If necessary the president may present such recommendations to the Board of Trustees for its consideration.

Article 20

The enumeration of this bill of certain rights shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the student. Nothing contained in this bill shall be construed as any denial or limitation upon the legal authority or responsibility of the Board of Trustees to establish policies and to make rules and regulations governing the operation of Purdue University.

Article 21

Proposed amendments of this Bill of Student Rights may be initiated by the Purdue Student Government, Purdue Graduate Student Government, University Senate, administrative officials, or the Board of Trustees and shall be submitted to the Purdue Student Government and University Senate for consideration and recommendation before adoption by the Board of Trustees. In the event the Board of Trustees adopts an amendment not approved by the Purdue Student Government, Purdue Graduate Student Government, and University Senate, then the Purdue Student Government or University Senate may withdraw its endorsement of the bill in whole or in part.


Purdue University Code of Honor

(From Vice President and Treasurer Memo A-16. Board of Trustees, April 30, 1970. Revised by the January 9, 1975, July 10, May 31, 1997.)

The purpose of the Purdue University academic community is to discover and disseminate truth. In order to achieve these goals, the university commits itself towards maintaining a culture of academic integrity and honesty. For this to be possible, self-discipline and a strong desire to benefit others must be present within each individual. Therefore, we students must follow the Regulations Governing Student Conduct of Purdue University out of a sense of mutual respect, rather than out of fear of the consequences of their violation.


Regulations Governing Student Conduct, Disciplinary Proceedings, and Appeals

(From Vice President and Treasurer Memo A-16. Board of Trustees, April 30, 1970, with revisions dated January 9 and July 10, 1975, May 31, 1997, April 2, 1999, April 9, 2010, May 10, 2013, June 1, 2014, August 15, 2016, July 1, 2018. and August 19, 2020.)

  1. Authority, Application, Amendments

    1. Authority. These regulations are enacted pursuant to the power and authority conferred by the laws of the state of Indiana upon the Trustees of Purdue University, including without limitation, the power to do all acts necessary and expedient to put and keep Purdue University in operation, and to make all by-laws, rules, and regulations required or proper to conduct and manage the University, as provided in Indiana Code 21-27-7-4 and 21-27-7-5, and the power and duty to do all acts and things mandated or provided for in Indiana Code 21-39-2-2, 21-39-2-3, 21-39-2-4, and 21-39-2-5.

    2. Application: These regulations, as from time to time amended, and except to the extent adapted for regional campuses pursuant to Subsection A-4 below, shall apply to all undergraduate, graduate, and professional school students of Purdue University at the West Lafayette campus, each regional campus, and each Purdue Polytechnic Statewide location, and shall be deemed a part of the terms and conditions of the admission and enrollment of all students as of the stated effective date. Unless specifically noted, these regulations apply to behaviors that occur both off and on campus.  Alleged violations of the University’s Anti-Harassment Policy and of the University’s Equal Access, Equal Opportunity, and Affirmative Action Policy are governed exclusively by the Procedures for Resolving Complaints of Discrimination and Harassment and not by these regulations. In case of any conflict or inconsistencies with any other rules, regulations, directives, or policies of the University now existing, these regulations shall govern. They shall be enforced by the President.

    3. Amendments. Pursuant to the authority delegated to the President of the University by resolution of the Board of Trustees adopted April 9, 2010, any amendments to these regulations shall take effect on a date prescribed by, and shall remain in effect until rescinded or modified by, the President.  Amendments may be proposed at any time by the Purdue Student Government, Purdue Graduate Student Government, University Senate, administrative staff, or by the Board of Trustees.  The Office of the Dean of Students shall, in consultation with the Office of Legal Counsel, conduct a review of these regulations every two years for the purpose of identifying any necessary updates resulting from changes in applicable law or University policy.

    4. Adaptation for Regional Campuses. The Chancellors are hereby authorized and directed to make and promulgate modifications of these regulations, as applied to the regional campuses, which are necessary because of the different student or faculty organizations or governments existing at the regional campuses. Such revisions shall be effective when approved by the President, acting under the delegated authority of the Board of Trustees.

    5. Definitions:

Advisor means any person selected by a student to assist him/her in a disciplinary proceeding. A student has the right to be assisted by an advisor, but the advisor is not permitted to speak or participate directly in any other manner during any disciplinary proceeding, nor may he/she appear in lieu of the student. Students are responsible for representing themselves.  The advisor need not be an attorney, but the student is allowed to have an attorney serve as his/her advisor in the disciplinary proceeding, at his/her own expense, with the understanding that the attorney’s role is as an advisor rather than as an advocate. It is the responsibility of the student to arrange for an advisor who is available at the time of the scheduled disciplinary proceeding. Postponement or rescheduling of student disciplinary proceedings due to availability of an advisor will not be permitted.

Chancellor means the chief executive officer of the Indiana University-Purdue University Ft. Wayne and Purdue Northwest regional campuses.

Conduct Officer means a staff member authorized by the Office of the Dean of Students to administer disciplinary proceedings and represent the University at Community Standards Board hearings.

Dean of Students/Dean’s Office means the dean of students or another person authorized to act for him/her.

Degree deferral means a sanction issued against a student who has completed the coursework of his/her degree program but who, at the time of the conduct in question, had not yet received a degree.  In the case of such a sanction, student status shall be suspended, no grades (other than directed grades) or academic credit shall be given, no degree shall be awarded, and no diploma shall be given, in each case for such a period of time and subject to the satisfaction of such conditions as the University decision-maker imposing the sanction may determine.  In cases where a degree deferral sanction has been issued, it will be notated on the student’s academic transcript until the date, if any, on which a degree is awarded based on the expiration of the sanction or the satisfaction of the imposed conditions, or both.  The term “degree deferral” is not intended to cover the University’s temporary withholding of a degree from a student pending the completion of any educational sanctions imposed under these regulations.

Degree revocation means rescinding a degree previously awarded by the University. In cases where a degree revocation sanction has been issued, it will be noted on the student’s academic transcript on a permanent basis.

Disciplinary probation means a probationary student status imposed for a limited time as a result of an official determination of conduct. In the event the student is found in violation (under the procedures set forth in these regulations) of subsequent charges of conduct, records of such disciplinary probations shall be taken into consideration in determining the disciplinary sanction, if any, to be imposed because of such subsequent conduct. Students placed on a status of disciplinary probation are restricted from holding elected and/or appointed positions in recognized student organizations and may be subject to additional restrictions as determined by the Conduct Officer.

Disciplinary proceeding means an administrative hearing conducted by a Conduct Officer or by a Community Standards Board panel in the manner described in these regulations for the purpose of considering whether a violation has been committed and making a determination as to any related disciplinary sanction/decision to be imposed.

Diversion Program is the Protect Purdue Diversion Program described in Section E.

Disciplinary sanction/decision means expulsion, degree deferral, suspension, probated suspension, disciplinary probation, written warning, restriction(s), and/or educational sanctions, as these terms are defined herein.

Educational sanctions means the imposition of mandatory learning opportunities for students who violate the University’s regulations, which require them to participate in reasonable and relevant educational activities that foster their personal, ethical and social development. Educational sanctions may be proposed in combination with other disciplinary actions. Examples of educational sanctions include but are not limited to referrals for assessments for substance use and abuse, community service, reflective writing assignments, research projects and presentations, and academic assessment referrals.

Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs and Diversity and Provost (“Provost”) is the chief academic affairs officer or another person authorized to act for him/her.

Expulsion means permanent termination of student status, generally without grades; however, in cases such as academic dishonesty, a directed grade for a particular course may be appropriate.  In cases where an expulsion sanction has been issued, it will be notated on the student’s academic transcript on a permanent basis.  In cases where an expulsion sanction has been issued against a student who has completed the coursework of his/her degree program but who, at the time of the conduct in question, had not yet received a degree, the expulsion sanction will result in no grades or academic credit being given, no degree being awarded, and no diploma being given.

Informal action means an action designed to educate students about the behavioral standards expected of them as members of the University community and to hold them accountable for inappropriate conduct.

Obstruction or disruption of a University activity means any unlawful or objectionable act or conduct (1) that seriously threatens the ability of the University to maintain or use its facilities for the performance of its educational, research and engagement activities, functions, or processes; (2) that is in violation of the reasonable rules and standards of the University designed to protect the academic community from unlawful conduct; or (3) that presents a serious threat to person or property of the academic community.  Such phrase shall include, without limitation of the foregoing general definition: (a) the unlawful use of force or violence on or within any buildings or grounds owned, used, occupied, or controlled by the University; (b) using or occupying any such buildings or grounds in violation of reasonable rules or regulations of the University, or for the purpose or with the effect of denying or interfering with the lawful use thereof by others; (c) injuring or harming any person or damaging or destroying the property of the University or the property of others within such buildings and grounds; (d) obstructing building entrances, walkways, and rights-of-way or otherwise obstructing vehicular or pedestrian traffic on or adjacent to campus; and (e) interfering with classes, meetings, events or ceremonies sanctioned or sponsored by the University or with other essential processes of the University.

Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities (OSRR) is an administrative unit of the Office of the Dean of Students (ODOS) responsible for promoting student responsibility and encouraging honesty, integrity, and respect among Purdue students through education, compliance with behavioral standards, and support of individual rights.

President means the chief executive officer of the University.

Probated suspension means conditional continuation of student status for a limited and defined period of time. The student is permitted to retain student status upon the condition that the student does not further violate any provision of Subsection B-2 that would normally result in a disciplinary sanction/decision during the time probated suspension is in effect. If, during the period of probated suspension, the student is found responsible for an additional violation of Subsection B-2 after a hearing, suspension may become immediately effective and may be extended for a longer period of time than the period of probated suspension originally assigned.  Students placed on a status of probated suspension are restricted from holding elected and/or appointed positions in recognized student organizations and may be subject to additional restrictions as determined by the Conduct Officer.

Restriction means the withdrawal or limitation of privileges for a defined period of time. This may include the ability to access or enter certain campus facilities, the ability to participate in co-curricular activities, and the ability to hold positions in which one may represent the University in an official capacity.

Student means an individual who has been offered and accepted an offer of admission to Purdue University at the West Lafayette campus, a regional campus, or a Purdue Polytechnic Statewide location or who is otherwise enrolled or participating in any Purdue course or program of study at one of the foregoing campuses or locations. This definition includes individuals who withdraw after allegedly violating this code or who are registered for a future semester, even if not currently enrolled. In addition, persons who are living in University Residence Halls, although not enrolled in the institution, are also considered “students” for the purpose of enforcing this code.

Summary action means an immediate disciplinary suspension and exclusion from University property imposed under certain circumstances, as more particularly described in Subsection C-9 of these regulations.

Suspension means termination of student status for a limited time, generally without grades; however, in cases such as academic dishonesty, a directed grade for a particular course may be appropriate. In cases where a suspension sanction has been issued, it will be notated on the student’s academic transcript for the duration of the suspension.  

University activity is any teaching, research, service, administrative, or other function, proceeding, ceremony, program, or activity conducted by or under the authority of the University, or with which the University has any official connection, whether taking place on or off campus, including without limitation University cooperative education programs, internships, practicum, field experiences, and athletic or other intercollegiate activities.

University business day means a day when the University is open for normal business, regardless of whether classes are in session (e.g., the day preceding Thanksgiving).

University property means property owned, controlled, supervised, used, or occupied by the University.

Vice Provost for Student Life (VPSL) is the chief student affairs officer or another person authorized to act for him/her.

Written Warning is a disciplinary action consisting of an official notification to a student that his/her behavior is inappropriate and not in compliance with the standards set forth in these regulations.

  1. Student Conduct

    1. General. Students are expected and required to abide by the laws of the state of Indiana and of the United States and the rules and regulations of Purdue University, to conduct their academic and scholarly pursuits with the highest levels of ethical and honest behavior, to conduct themselves in accordance with accepted standards of social behavior, to respect the rights of others, and to refrain from any conduct that tends to obstruct the work of the University or to be injurious to the welfare of the University. A student who violates these general standards of conduct may be subject to informal actions (as defined in Subsection A-5).  If the violation falls within one of the categories of conduct listed in Subsection B-2, the student may also be subject to disciplinary sanctions. No disciplinary sanction/decision may be imposed except for conduct covered by one of the categories listed in Subsection B-2.  Violations of the University’s Anti-Harassment policy and of the University’s Equal Opportunity, Equal Access and Affirmative Action policy, as well as the investigation and resolution of complaints made under those policies, are governed exclusively by the Procedures for Resolving Complaints of Discrimination and Harassment and not by these regulations.

    2. Conduct Subject to Disciplinary Sanctions. The following actions constitute conduct for which students may be subject to informal action or disciplinary sanctions

      1. Dishonesty in connection with any University activity.  The expectation to uphold the standards of academic integrity and honesty is a responsibility of every member of the University community.  Cheating, plagiarism, or knowingly furnishing false information to the University are examples of dishonesty.  As recognized by the University Senate, “the commitment of the acts of cheating, lying, stealing, and deceit in any of their diverse forms (such as the use of ghost-written papers, the use of substitutes for taking examinations, the use of illegal cribs, plagiarism, and copying during examinations) is dishonest and must not be tolerated. Moreover, knowingly to aid and abet, directly or indirectly, other parties in committing dishonest acts is in itself dishonest.” (University Senate Document 72-18, December 15, 1972).  Accordingly, the following behaviors will be considered violations of these standards and are subject to disciplinary action as set forth in these procedures.  

        1. Cheating: Students are expected to adhere to the guidelines provided by instructors for academic work so that no student gains an unfair advantage. Using or attempting to use unauthorized materials, information, study aids, notes, or any other device in any academic exercise will not be tolerated. Unauthorized materials may include anything which or anyone who gives a student assistance that has not been approved by the instructor in advance.

        2. Plagiarism: Intentionally or knowingly representing the words or ideas of another as one’s own in any academic exercise. The sole exception of the requirements of acknowledging sources is when the information is considered common knowledge.

        3. Fabrication: Intentional and/or unauthorized falsification or invention of any information or citation in any academic exercise.  Includes but is not necessarily limited to (A) the changing and/or manipulation of research data, results, processes, or research record; (B) the omission of results from the research record; and (C) the alteration and resubmission of a graded academic exercise.

        4. Multiple Submissions: The submission of substantial portions of the same academic work for credit more than once without authorization from the instructor.

        5. Collusion: Intentionally or knowingly helping or attempting to help another to violate any regulation governing the standards of academic integrity described in these regulations.  Students may only collaborate on academic work within the limits prescribed by the instructor.

      2. Forgery, alteration, or the unauthorized use of any documents, records, or identification.

      3. Obstruction or disruption of any University activity (as defined in Subsection A-5) or inciting, aiding, or encouraging other persons to engage in such conduct.

      4. Physical abuse of any person or conduct that threatens or endangers the health or safety of any other person, whether or not such conduct occurs on University property.

      5. Hazing: Any act that endangers the physical and/or mental health or safety of a student or any act or behavior that causes ridicule or humiliation for the purposes of initiation, admission into, or affiliation with, or as a condition for continued membership in, a group or organization, or as part of any activity of a recognized student organization or student group.  Individuals or groups may not consent to these types of prohibited behavior. Individuals will be held accountable for their own actions, and neither citing the activity as a “tradition” nor being coerced by current or former student leaders of such groups or organizations will suffice as a justifiable reason for participation in such activity.    Examples of prohibited behavior under the hazing category include but are not limited to:

        1. Misuse of authority by virtue of one’s leadership position

        2. Assaulting an individual by paddling, beating, striking, or hitting

        3. Preventing an individual from attending class

        4. Requiring another to engage in any form of forced physical activity or exercise

        5. Failing to report any of the foregoing behavior to the appropriate University officials (e.g., the Office of the Dean of Students and/or the Purdue University Police Department) after having firsthand knowledge of the planning of such activities or firsthand knowledge that an incident of this type has occurred.

The foregoing list of prohibited behaviors under the hazing category is not intended to prohibit the following conduct:

  • Planning or participating in customary public athletic events, contests, or competitions that are sponsored by the University or the organized and supervised practices associated with such events; or
  • Planning or participating in any activity or conduct that furthers the goals of a legitimate educational curriculum, a legitimate extracurricular program or a legitimate military training program as defined and approved by the University.
  1. Theft or attempted theft of, or the unauthorized use or possession of, or the unauthorized exertion of control over, or causing damage to property of any kind.

  2. Unauthorized entry or access to, or unauthorized use or occupancy of, any University property, including without limitation lands, buildings, structures, telecommunications, computer or data processing equipment, programs, systems, software, or other facilities or services connected with a University activity.

  3. Violation of any University rule governing student organizations, or the use of University property (including the time, place, and manner of meetings or demonstrations on University property), or of any other University rule that is reasonably related to the orderly operation of the University; provided, however, that no disciplinary sanction shall be imposed in any such case unless it is shown that the accused student knew, or, in the exercise of reasonable care, should have known, of the rule in question. Examples of prohibited behavior under this category include but are not limited to:

    1. Willfully failing or refusing to adhere to the requirements of the Protect Purdue Pledge, which has been adopted by the University’s Board of Trustees as an official University regulation and will be enforced as such; and;

    2. Organizing and/or hosting, either individually or with others, an event, party or other gathering (“Event”), or attending such an Event, where the attendees are not required to, or willfully fail or refuse to, adhere to the requirements of the Protect Purdue Pledge or of state or local public health laws, regulations or orders, including but not limited to the requirements of maintaining appropriate social distancing (6 feet based on current public health guidance) and wearing an appropriate face mask.  This applies to Events that are organized and/or held on or off campus.

  4. Use, possession, providing, manufacturing, or distribution of any illegal drug, controlled substance, narcotic or prescription drug, except as expressly permitted by law.  Intentionally or recklessly inhaling or ingesting any substance (e.g., nitrous oxide, glue, paint, etc.) for the purpose or effect of altering a student’s mental state is also prohibited.
  1. Lewd, indecent, or obscene conduct on University property or in connection with a University activity.

  2. Failure to comply with directions of University officials acting in the performance of their duties, including but not limited to failing to present identification upon request of a University official acting in the official capacity of his/her position.

  3. Any conduct that substantially threatens or interferes with the maintenance of appropriate order and discipline in the operation of the University, or any conduct on University property or in connection with a University activity that invades the rights of others.

  4. The possession, sale, use, or manufacturing of alcohol beverages in or on any University property, unless expressly permitted by law or University Regulations (University Senate Document, 99-9, April 24, 2000).  Additionally, prohibited behavior includes displaying behavior of public intoxication, operating a vehicle or other mode of transportation under the influence of alcohol, and providing or distributing alcohol to a minor, whether or not such conduct occurs on University property.

  5. The possession, use, or distribution of any explosives, guns, or other deadly or dangerous weapons reasonably calculated to cause bodily injury on University property or in connection with a University activity, unless specifically authorized by the University (University Senate Document 99-10, April 24, 2000).

  6. Violating the terms of any University disciplinary sanction.  This behavior includes violating standards outlined in these regulations while currently under a University sanction for previous behavior or failing to meet deadlines and/or requirements assigned in conjunction with a violation of these regulations. 

  1. Demonstrations. Any individual or group expressive activity that has the intent or effect of calling attention to the participants’ point of view on an issue is not of itself misconduct. Demonstrations that do not involve conduct beyond the scope of constitutionally protected rights of free speech and assembly are, of course, permissible.  However, conduct that is otherwise improper cannot be justified merely because it occurs in the context of a demonstration.  Demonstrations that involve violations of any provision of Subsection B-2 will not be permitted. A student will be charged with misconduct for any individual misconduct committed by the student in the course of a demonstration.

  2. Status During Suspension and Degree Deferral. No grades (other than directed grades) or academic credit shall be given, no degree shall be awarded, and no diploma shall be given to any student who has been suspended from the University so long as the suspension is in effect.  Similarly, no grades (other than directed grades) or academic credit shall be given, no degree shall be awarded, and no diploma shall be given to any student who received the sanction of a degree deferral until such time as the degree deferral period has expired and all conditions related thereto have been satisfied. 

  3. Status During Appeal of Expulsion.  No grades (other than directed grades) or academic credit shall be given, no degree shall be awarded, and no diploma shall be given to any student who has been expelled while an appeal, if any, under these regulations is pending.  After the time for any appeal of expulsion has expired, or upon the conclusion of any unsuccessful appeal of expulsion, no grades or academic credit shall be given, no degree shall be awarded, and no diploma shall be given to any student who has been expelled.

  4. Status During Disciplinary Proceedings.  Except where summary action is taken as provided in Subsection C-9, the status of a student charged with misconduct shall not be affected pending the final disposition of charges; provided, however, that no diploma shall be given, and no grades (other than directed grades), academic credit, or degree shall be awarded, to a student against whom charges are pending for which a disciplinary sanction may be imposed.  The effective date of any disciplinary sanction shall be a date established by the final adjudicating University authority.

  5. Conduct Subject to Other Penalties. As provided by Indiana Code 21-39-2-5, conduct that constitutes a violation of these rules and regulations may be sanctioned after determination of responsibility by the procedures herein provided, without regard to whether such conduct also constitutes an offense under the criminal laws of any state or of the United States or whether such conduct might result in civil liability of the violator to other persons.

  1. Procedures in Student Conduct Cases
  1. Any individual from inside or outside the University community may file a complaint against a student suspected of violating University regulations. The complaint shall be directed to the Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities (OSRR). Complaints should be submitted as soon as possible after the event takes place, preferably no later than during the semester in which the event happened. Upon receipt of an alleged violation, the Conduct Officer will conduct an initial review of the information provided.  

                After this initial review of the complaint, the Conduct Officer will determine:

  1. Whether there is insufficient information to move forward with student disciplinary proceedings.
    1. The Conduct Officer may elect to conduct a preliminary investigation of the complaint to determine if additional information may be obtained that would lead to student disciplinary proceedings being initiated.

    2. In addition, the Conduct Officer may request to meet with the student identified as the subject of the complaint to discuss the circumstances surrounding the incident.  (This meeting may, but need not, also serve as the pre-hearing information session described in Subsection C-2-b below.)

  2. Whether there is sufficient information to initiate student disciplinary proceedings as described in these regulations.

  3. If student disciplinary proceedings are to be initiated: (i) whether an individual hearing with the Conduct Officer of record or a hearing before the Purdue University Community Standards Board (CSB) panel should occur, or (ii) whether, in the Conduct Officer’s sole discretion and judgment, the information supports the offer of diversion from formal proceedings via the Diversion Program described in Section E (to the extent the case has not already been dismissed or referred to the Diversion Program pursuant to the Summary Action procedures described in Subsection C-9-e-ii).   

  1. Disciplinary Proceedings, General. Except for a disposition pursuant to the Summary Action procedures described in Subsection C-9-e-ii and the Diversion Program procedures described in Section E, the procedures hereby established and set forth in Subsection C-1 to C-7 shall be followed in all cases in which the University initiates disciplinary proceedings against students for alleged violations of the standards of student conduct set forth in Subsection III-B.  
  1. Relationship to Other Procedures.  These procedures shall not affect additional jurisdiction or procedures established by recognized student organizations or agencies/offices authorized to act on behalf of the University (e.g., Office of Vice President for Ethics and Compliance, University Residences, Recreational Sports, Student Activities and Organizations, Intercollegiate Athletics, etc.).

  2. Pre-Hearing Information Session. At any pre-hearing information session held with the student, a representative of the OSRR will meet informally with the student prior to the hearing to explain the disciplinary process and to answer questions about the procedures and possible consequences.  The attendance of the student at such a pre-hearing information session is required in cases where the alleged misconduct may result in the student’s being suspended or expelled from the University or receiving a degree deferral sanction.  In other cases, the pre-hearing information session will be offered to the student as an optional step in the process.  The pre-hearing information session may be held either before or after a notice of charges is formally delivered to the student.

  1. Initiation of Disciplinary Proceedings
    1. Disciplinary proceedings shall be initiated by the Conduct Officer by the issuance of a written notice of charges.

    2. The notice of charges (and all other written notices given to students against whom disciplinary proceedings are initiated) shall be delivered by the most effective method (including electronic means) to the student’s address as it then appears on the official records of the University. The notice shall inform the student of the rule or regulation allegedly violated, fairly inform the student of the reported circumstances of the alleged violation and either (i) require the student to appear before the Conduct Officer for an individual hearing regarding the alleged violation, or (ii) inform the student that there will be a hearing regarding the alleged violation before a panel of the Community Standards Board as described in Subsection C-7.  A reference to these regulations shall accompany each notice of charges.  A copy of the notice of charges may be sent to the parent or guardian of the student if the student is a dependent as defined in Section 152 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended.

  2. Failure to Respond to Charges

    1. If the notice of charges requests the student to appear before the Conduct Officer and the student fails or refuses to appear, the Conduct Officer may, after conducting such investigation as he/she may deem necessary, dismiss the charges or impose a disciplinary sanction/decision as defined in Subsection A-5 of these regulations.

    2. If the Conduct Officer imposes a disciplinary sanction/decision as defined in Subsection A-5 of these regulations, he/she shall notify the student in writing of such action, and the student may, subject to the eligibility criteria and procedures set forth in Subsection C-8, appeal this action to the VPSL (or his/her designee), the Provost (or his/her designee), or the Dean of the Graduate School (or his/her designee), as applicable, in each case as provided in Subsection C-8.

    3. When it appears necessary to avoid undue hardship or to avoid injustice, the Conduct Officer may extend the time to enable a student to respond to the charges.

  3. Response to Charges

    1. If the student appears before the Conduct Officer in response to the notice of charges, either (i) for the purpose of an individual hearing regarding the alleged violation as provided in Subsection C-3-b or (ii) for the purpose of a pre-hearing information session as provided in Subsection 2-b, the Conduct Officer shall advise the student as fully as possible of the facts concerning the charges. 

    2. The student will be informed that he/she is afforded the following rights in connection with the student disciplinary proceeding:

      1. The right to be informed of the allegations against him/her that have formed the basis for the charges;
      2. The right to make a statement regarding the allegations and the charges. The student may choose to not make a statement regarding the allegations and the charges. The decision not to make a statement will not be held against the student in determining whether or not he/she is responsible for committing a policy violation;
      3. The right to be informed of any witnesses that the University will call as part of the disciplinary proceeding;
      4. The right to present witnesses as part of the student’s response to the allegations and the charges.  Students may present witnesses in person, with the exception of character witnesses, which will be considered in written format only;
      5. The right to have one person of the student’s choosing serve as an advisor to the student during the disciplinary proceeding;
      6. The right to be informed of the outcome of the student disciplinary proceeding; and
      7. The right to appeal the decision of the Conduct Officer subject to the eligibility criteria and procedures set forth in Subsection C-8 (Appeal of the Disciplinary Decision).
  4. Procedures for Conducting Individual Hearings with Conduct Officer

    1. Each hearing shall be conducted before a Conduct Officer.  Although the hearing process is informal in nature, it shall be conducted in accordance with the rights described in Subsection C-5 and shall provide the following procedural safeguards:

      1. The student shall have the opportunity to hear information regarding the alleged violation;
      2. The student shall have the opportunity to rebut statements made by witnesses;
      3. The student shall have the opportunity to present witnesses or any relevant information in the student’s own behalf; and
      4. The student shall be given the opportunity to respond to any new information gathered during any investigation conducted subsequent to a preliminary meeting with the Conduct Officer as described in Subsection C-1-a-(ii) or subsequent to the individual hearing described in this Subsection C-6.
    2. After hearing all relevant information and conducting such further investigation as the Conduct Officer may deem necessary, the Conduct Officer has the responsibility to determine whether it is more likely than not that the student is responsible for the alleged violation(s). The decision of the Conduct Officer shall be based solely on information obtained at any preliminary meeting between the student and the Conduct Officer, introduced at the hearing, or obtained during any subsequent investigation conducted by or at the request of the Conduct Officer. The finding shall be rendered by the Conduct Officer, who shall be present for all testimony and discussion of the results of any such investigation.

    3. No person other than the student, his/her advisor as defined above, the Conduct Officer, and staff members of OSRR shall be present during the discussion between the Conduct Officer and the student except by mutual agreement of both parties.

    4. Normally, within five University business days following the conclusion of the hearing and any subsequent investigation that the Conduct Officer may have deemed necessary, the Conduct Officer shall make the determination as to whether it is more likely than not that the student is responsible for the alleged violation(s). The Conduct Officer shall notify the student of the decision.  The decision letter shall contain a finding as to the responsibility of the accused student and a brief statement of the reasons for the sanction(s), if any.  Any disciplinary sanction imposed or informal action taken is subject to the provisions of Subsection B-4 and Subsection B-5 (relating to status during suspension or degree deferral and status during appeal of an expulsion sanction), as well as all other applicable University rules, regulations, or directives.

    5. Subject to the eligibility criteria and procedures set forth in Subsection C-8 (Appeal of the Disciplinary Decision), a student may appeal a disciplinary sanction/decision that has been issued.  If an appeal is allowed and properly submitted in accordance with Subsection C-8, instructions regarding the appeal form and notification of appeals procedures, including the address (which may be an email address) to which the appeal may be submitted, shall be provided in the decision letter to the student.

  5. Community Standards Board Hearings 

    1. Purpose.  The Community Standards Board (CSB) is organized by the OSRR to adjudicate student conduct cases that may result in suspension, degree deferral, expulsion, or degree revocation for the charged student.  Cases that may not result in separation from the University may also be forwarded to the CSB for adjudication at the discretion of the OSRR. 

    2. Composition.  The CSB membership is composed of a pool of panelists representing undergraduates, graduate students, staff and faculty who have voluntarily applied and been trained to serve on a CSB panel.  CSB members are trained to function as a team, to ask clear, sensitive and relevant questions designed to determine the facts of the case, and to consider the facts carefully and make recommendations for fair sanctions.

    3. Organization and Governance.  For each case brought before it, the empaneled CSB generally consists of three students, one faculty member and one administrative staff member selected by OSRR from among the CSB membership.  In cases involving alleged academic dishonesty or in cases where degree revocation is a possible sanction, the CSB panel must include a faculty member.  Each CSB panel selects a chair from among its membership to preside over all of its proceedings.  In order to constitute a quorum necessary to proceed with a hearing, the CSB panel must have four members present, including at least three students and one staff or faculty member.  Decisions of the CSB panel shall be rendered by vote of a majority of the quorum.  In the event of any tie, the chair of the CSB panel shall be empowered to break the tie.   

    4. Procedures for CSB Hearings.

      1. Each hearing shall be conducted before the members of a CSB panel and shall follow procedures similar to those of an individual hearing with the Conduct Officer.  Although the hearing is formal in nature, it shall be conducted in accordance with the rights described in Subsection C-5 and shall provide the student with the opportunity (A) to hear information regarding the alleged violation; (B) to rebut statements made by witnesses; (C) to present witnesses or any relevant information in the student’s own behalf; and (D) to respond to any new information gathered during any investigation conducted subsequent to the preliminary meeting with the Conduct Officer as described in Subsection C-1-a-(ii).

      2. Both the referred student and the Conduct Officer will have the opportunity to appear before the CSB panel to present information about the incident.  As noted above, the student may present witnesses.  The Conduct Officer may also present any of the witnesses who were previously disclosed to the student.  CSB panel members may direct questions to the student and/or to the witnesses.

      3. No person other than the student, his/her advisor, or witnesses shall be present during the hearing except by mutual agreement of the CSB panel and the student.

    5. Recommendation of the CSB Panel.  After hearing all relevant information, the CSB panel will (A) deliberate and make a written recommendation to the Dean of Students regarding whether it is more likely than not that the student is responsible for the alleged violation(s), and, if so (B) recommend sanctions to the Dean of Students.  The recommendation of the CSB panel shall be based solely on information introduced at the hearing. In cases in which degree revocation is the recommended sanction, this recommendation will also be forwarded to the Senior Vice Provost for Teaching and Learning (for undergraduate students) or to the Dean of the Graduate School (for graduate students), or his/her designee.

    6. Decision by Dean of Students.  Normally, within five University business days following the conclusion of the hearing and any further investigation deemed necessary, the Dean of Students, or in cases involving degree revocation, the Dean of Students and Senior Vice Provost for Teaching and Learning (for undergraduate students) or the Dean of the Graduate School (for graduate students) (or his/her designee), shall review the recommendation of the CSB panel and make the determination as to whether it is more likely than not that the student is responsible for the alleged violation(s). The Dean of Students shall notify the student of the decision. The decision letter shall contain a finding as to the responsibility of the accused student and a brief statement of the reasons for the sanction, if any. Any disciplinary sanction imposed or informal action taken is subject to the provisions of Subsection B-4 and Subsection B-5 (relating to status during suspension or degree deferral and status during appeal of an expulsion sanction), as well as any other applicable University rules, regulations, or directives.

    7. Appeal.  Subject to the eligibility criteria and procedures set forth in Subsection C-8 (Appeal of the Disciplinary Decision), a student may appeal a disciplinary sanction/decision that has been issued by the Dean of Students.  Instructions regarding the appeal form and notification of appeals procedures, including the address (which may be an email address) to which the appeal may be submitted, shall be provided in the decision letter if the student is found responsible for the violations.

  6. Appeal of the Disciplinary Sanction/Decision

    1. A student may appeal a disciplinary sanction where:

      1. There is significant new information related to the case that was not available at the time of the individual hearing with the Conduct Officer or initial hearing and that would alter the finding and/or sanction(s) assigned in the case. The new information must be detailed in an appeal letter with an explanation of why the information was not available at the time of the individual hearing with the Conduct Officer.  A student who fails to appear for his/her initial disciplinary proceeding after notice has been sent to his/her University-issued email address will be deemed to have waived the right to present witnesses and relevant information in the student’s own behalf and thus foreclosed from presenting “significant new information” on appeal.

      2. There is evidence that the University failed to follow established procedures.

      3. The assigned sanction of expulsion, suspension, degree deferral, probated suspension, disciplinary probation, or restrictions, is grossly disproportionate to the violation. Assigned sanctions of a written warning and/or educational sanctions may not be appealed.

    2. In cases involving alleged academic dishonesty, an undergraduate student may appeal a disciplinary decision of the OSRR or CSB to the Provost or his/her designee.  In cases involving alleged academic dishonesty, a graduate/professional program student may appeal a disciplinary decision of the OSRR or CSB to the Dean of the Graduate School or his/her designee.  In cases involving degree revocation, undergraduate and graduate students may appeal a disciplinary decision of the CSB to the Provost or his/her designee. All other appeals of disciplinary decisions imposed by the OSRR or the CSB may be appealed to the VPSL or his/her designee.

    3. The appeal must be submitted by the student in accordance with the instructions provided to him/her and state the specific grounds for the appeal. The appeal must be received by the appropriate appeal officer within five University business days of the date of the decision letter.  It is the student’s responsibility to ensure that the appeal notice is received by the appropriate appeal officer by the specified due date. Disciplinary decisions not properly appealed by such date are deemed final, or in the case of degree revocation, are recommended to the Board of Trustees for final action.

    4. Appeals will be decided solely on the basis of the record of the original proceeding and the written materials provided to support the appeal.

    5. The appeal officer shall review all material pertinent to the case. The appeal officer may affirm the findings and/or sanction, decrease the sanction, or remand the case to the original hearing authority for a second hearing.

    6. The appeal officer shall notify the student in writing (which may be sent to his/her University-issued email address) of the outcome of the case, normally within ten University business days of the appeal officer’s receipt of the appeal. All decisions of the appeal officer are final, subject only, in the case of a degree revocation, to the final action by the Board of Trustees.

  7. Summary Action

    1. Summary action by way of an immediate disciplinary suspension and exclusion from University property may be imposed when the student’s continued presence poses a threat to (i) the safety, security, or well-being of members or guests of the University community, (ii) University property, or (iii) the ability of the University to maintain normal operations and carry on its programs, services and activities free of disruption.
    2. Summary action may be taken by the Dean of Students, the VPSL, the Provost, or the President.

    3. During the period of summary action, the student may be denied access to University-owned housing, University property, and classes (whether delivered through on-campus or on-line methods).  In addition: (i) the student may be restricted from all other University activities or privileges for which the student might otherwise be eligible, and (ii) in cases of alleged violations of the Protect Purdue Pledge described in Subsection B-2-h, the student may be required, as a condition to returning to University housing, property, classes or activities, to provide to the Protect Purdue Health Center proof of a negative COVID-19 test, taken at the student’s expense in a 5-7 day window after the alleged violation

    4. Whenever summary action is taken under this Subsection C-9, and if a summary dismissal is not granted as provided in Subsection C-9-e-ii below or if a diversion from formal proceedings is not made available under the Diversion Program described in Section E, the applicable procedures provided for in Subsection C for a hearing and any appeal in the related disciplinary proceeding shall be expedited so far as possible to shorten the period of summary action.

    5. A student subject to summary action may submit a written appeal to the Conduct Officer of record within five University business days of receiving notice of the summary action.  The appeal may be accompanied by written evidence, which may include written testimony of witnesses, bearing on the issue of whether summary action is appropriate in the case.  The Conduct Officer of record shall make a decision on the appeal normally within five business days following its receipt.

      1. Except as provided in Subsection 9-e-ii below, a favorable decision on the appeal shall be limited to lifting or modifying the terms of the summary action and shall not affect the conduct of the hearing and any appeal in the related disciplinary proceeding.

      2. In cases of alleged violations of the Protect Purdue Pledge described in Subsection B-2-h, the Conduct Officer of record may, upon review of the evidence and in such officer’s sole discretion and judgment, do one of the following:

        1. Dismiss the summary suspension and restore the student’s status without the need for further disciplinary proceedings under this Section C or for a diversion from formal proceedings under the Diversion Program described in Section E; provided, however, that if the Conduct Officer determines, based on evidence and in consultation with a medical advisor, that the student may have had a clinically relevant COVID-19 contact in connection with the incident giving rise to the alleged violation, the student may be required to: (A) comply with the test requirement described in Subsection 9-c(ii) above as a condition to returning to University activities, and/or (B) monitor symptoms and reaffirm the commitment to honor the Protect Purdue Pledge.

        2. Offer diversion from formal proceedings pursuant to the Diversion Program procedures described in Section E.

 

  1. The Campus Appeals Board

    1. Purpose.  A Campus Appeals Board shall be established for each campus of the University, the purpose of which is to hear appeals concerning decisions made by the University about student organizations, Student Supreme Court decisions, and complaints under the Student Bill of Rights.

    2. Organization and Governance.  For each case brought before it, the Campus Appeals Board for the West Lafayette Campus shall consist of three students and two faculty and/or staff members. The Campus Appeals Board shall be drawn from a pool of faculty, staff, and students who have been nominated, selected, and trained to serve in this capacity by members of the University community.

    3. Appeals Concerning Student Organizations.  On the West Lafayette campus, the Campus Appeals Board shall hear any appeal made by a student organization that the University has refused to recognize or against which the Office of the Dean of Students has issued a misconduct penalty in the form of suspension or withdrawal of recognition of the student organization.

      1. In a case of the University’s refusal to recognize a student organization, the Campus Appeals Board has the power to uphold or reverse the decision.

      2. In a case of an appeal of a misconduct penalty in the form of suspension or withdrawal of recognition of the student organization, the Campus Appeals Board has the power to affirm the findings and/or sanction(s), decrease the sanction, or remand the case to the original hearing authority for a second hearing.

     In each case, the action of the Campus Appeals Board on such appeal shall be final.

  1. Appeals from Student Supreme Court. On the West Lafayette campus, the Campus Appeals Board shall have discretionary jurisdiction to hear appeals from cases decided by the Student Supreme Court, either acting alone or, for cases involving student government elections, in concert with a board of Purdue Student Government advisors. In the cases it hears, the Campus Appeals Board may affirm or reverse a decision, and its action shall be final.

  2. Complaints under Bill of Student Rights. On the West Lafayette campus, the Campus Appeals Board shall hear complaints from students concerning actions or decisions made by the University that are claimed to violate rights established under the Bill of Student Rights.  In such cases, the Campus Appeals Board shall have the power and duty to make findings and recommendations to the President of the University or his/her designee, whose decision shall be final.

  1. Protect Purdue Diversion Program
    1. Purpose. As adopted by the Board of Trustees as an official University regulation, the elements of the Protect Purdue Pledge comprise a set of new and, in large part, temporary behavioral requirements that are essential to maintaining the health, safety and continuity of operations for the Purdue community during the COVID-19 pandemic.  Because of the novelty of this approach, the critical importance of the Protect Purdue Pledge to campus health and safety, and the need for rapid and diligent enforcement of its requirements, Purdue has implemented an informal program to facilitate the investigation and disposition of alleged violations of the Protect Purdue Pledge in appropriate cases, without the record permanency that would otherwise result from a finding of conduct violations.
    2. Process. The offer of referral to the Protect Purdue Diversion Program (the “Diversion Program”) is at the sole discretion and judgment of the Conduct Officer of record as described in subsection C-1-c.  Upon determining that an alleged violation is eligible for diversion, the following process shall occur:

      1. The Conduct Officer shall provide the student with a written summary of the charges and offer to divert the formal disciplinary proceedings and enter into a Diversion Agreement with the student.

      2. The student shall agree in writing to enter into the Program; provided, however, that at any time prior to the signing of a Diversion Agreement, the student may withdraw from the Program and elect to proceed through formal disciplinary proceedings.

      3. The Conduct Officer shall prepare and present to the student a written Diversion Agreement, which will contain the following:

        1. The specific public health and safety requirements the student must fulfill and the deadlines by which they must be completed, which may include: (1) the test requirement described in Subsection 9-c(ii) above as a condition to returning to University activities, and/or (2) monitoring symptoms and reaffirming the commitment to honor the Protect Purdue Pledge;

        2. Any limitations on campus access pending fulfillment of the requirements described in Subsection E-2-c-i;

        3. Any additional disciplinary sanctions or educational requirements;

        4. A statement that the student’s violation of the terms of the Diversion Agreement constitutes a conduct violation under Subsection B-2-h.

        5. The specific duration (e.g., semester, Academic Year) of the Diversion Agreement, during which the student must avoid any violations Subsection B-2.

      4. If the student agrees to the terms of the Diversion Agreement, they shall do so in writing by signing the Diversion Agreement.

      5. A student who fulfills the requirements of a Diversion Agreement shall not have any record of a violation of any University rule or regulation.

      6. A student who violates the requirements of a Diversion Agreement will be charged with a violation of Subsection B-2-h and will be subject to the formal disciplinary proceedings described in Subsection C.

      7. A student who commits a violation of these regulations while subject to the terms of a Diversion Agreement may be disciplined for both the original violation of the Protect Purdue Pledge and the subsequent violation.

    3. Standards.  In determining whether any alleged violation of the Protect Purdue Pledge is eligible for disposition through the Diversion Program, the Conduct Officer may consider:

      1. The nature and severity of the alleged violation, including any mitigating or aggravating circumstances;

      2. The student’s past conduct record;

      3. The likelihood that the student will cooperate and benefit from the Program and comply with its requirements; and

      4. Whether there are specific and tangible actions the student can take that will correct the violation of the Protect Purdue Pledge and protect the health, safety and continuity of the campus community.

  2. Grade Appeals System

    1. Adoption by Faculty. The faculty of the University at the West Lafayette Campus has adopted the following procedures for grade appeals pursuant to the authority delegated to the faculty. The Board of Trustees hereby approves such procedures for the West Lafayette Campus.

    2. General
      1. In the academic community, grades are a measure of student achievement toward fulfillment of course objectives. The responsibility for assessing student achievement and assigning grades rests with the faculty, and, except for unusual circumstances, the course grade given is final.
      2. The grade appeals system affords recourse to a student who has evidence or believes that evidence exists to show that an inappropriate grade has been assigned as a result of prejudice, caprice, or other improper conditions such as mechanical error, or assignment of a grade inconsistent with those assigned other students. Additionally, a student may challenge the reduction of a grade for alleged scholastic dishonesty.
      3. The only University authorities empowered to change grades are the instructor or, in the case of teaching assistants, the faculty member in charge of the course in question and the chairman/chairwoman of the University Grade Appeals Committee acting in behalf of the school and University grade appeals committees.
      4. Informal attempts must be made to resolve grade grievances and appeals at the lowest possible level - through the course instructor, through the department head, or through other informal procedures outlined by the college/school and/or department in which the course was taught.
      5. Graduate students who wish to appeal grades received in regular coursework may do so through the grade appeals system. Cases involving the decisions of graduate examination committees, the acceptance of graduate theses, and the application of professional standards relating to the retention of graduate students shall be handled by procedures authorized by the Graduate Council rather than the grade appeals system.
      6. When a student initiates a formal grade appeal, he/she should be prepared to state in what way his/her grade assignment was arbitrary, capricious, or otherwise improper. At that time, he/she may seek the assistance of the dean of students, the chairperson of one of the grade appeals committees, or his/her academic advisor.
      7. In appealing a grade, the burden of proof is on the student, except in the case of alleged academic dishonesty, where the instructor must support the allegation.
    3. College/School Grade Appeals Commitee

      1. Each of the colleges/schools of Purdue University at the West Lafayette Campus will establish a Grade Appeals Committee to hear grade grievances and appeals that are not resolved informally at a lower level. Each committee will consist of two students (undergraduate or graduate corresponding to the status of the appellant), three members of the instructional faculty, and a non-voting chairperson. The chairperson of the committee will be an assistant or associate dean of the college/school appointed by the dean. The chairperson will be responsible for assuring adherence to established procedures, convening members for an appeal, and maintaining records. The chairperson has the authority to grant warranted time extension in the appeals process described below.
      2. Voting members of the committee will be selected from a pool of at least eight students and eight instructional faculty. The pool of members of the committee will be selected according to school/college procedures in the spring (not later than May 1) to commence serving on the first day of the following fall semester. No member shall serve more than two consecutive terms in the pool.
    4. University Grade Appeals Committee
      1. A University Grade Appeals Committee, with the authority to hear appeals of school committee decisions, shall be established for the West Lafayette Campus. The University committee shall be responsible to and report to the Faculty Affairs Committee of the University Senate. In all appeal cases, the committee shall consist of two students (undergraduate or graduate to correspond to the status of the appealing student) and four members of the instructional faculty. They shall be selected in the following manner: four undergraduate students nominated by the student body president and confirmed by the Student Senate; four graduate students appointed by the Committee on Student Affairs of the University Senate; and eight faculty members selected by the University Senate. The student members shall be appointed annually. Two of the faculty members of the committee shall be elected annually for a three-year term.

      2. The members shall be selected in the spring (not later than May 1) to start serving on the first day of the following fall semester. No member shall serve more than two consecutive terms. If any appointing authority fails to make the initial appointments to the University Grade Appeals Committee within the specified time, or to fill any vacancy on the panel of members within five days after being notified to do so by the chairperson of the University Grade Appeals Committee, or if at any time the University Grade Appeals Committee cannot function because of refusal of any member to serve, the chairperson of the Faculty Affairs Committee may make appointments, fill vacancies, or take such other actions as he/she deems necessary to constitute a University Grade Appeals Committee.

      3. Annually, at the last University Grade Appeals Committee meeting of the academic year, the members for the coming year plus all retiring committee members shall elect (by majority vote) one of the eight regular faculty members to act as the new non-voting chairperson of the committee.

      4. The University Grade Appeals Committee shall adopt its own hearing proceedings, and establish uniform procedures to be followed by the college/school committees. The chairperson of the University Grade Appeals Committee shall be responsible for insuring that all school grade appeals committees are properly constituted and functional.

    5. Initiating a Grade Appeal

      1. Prior to initiating a grade appeal, the student is strongly encouraged to resolve the situation with the instructor, department head, or head’s designee. The department head is strongly encouraged to facilitate an informal resolution process between the parties.

      2. Appeal Process

        1. A student who wishes to initiate a grade appeal must file a written statement of allegations, facts, and circumstances concerning the grade assigned with the chairperson of the Grade Appeals Committee of the college/school in which the course was taken. This must be done within 30 calendar days after the start of the regular semester following the one in which the questioned grade was given.

        2. After receipt of the student’s written statement, the chairperson will promptly furnish a copy of the statement to the involved instructor who has seven days to make a written response. The chairperson will submit the statement of appeal and any responses to each of the members of the college/school grade appeals committee. Committee members will review the written documents within seven calendar days from the date they are received. If one voting member of the committee rules that the allegations warrant a hearing or are best addressed through a hearing, a hearing will be held; otherwise, the appeal will be denied. With reasonable cause, the chairperson may override the decision not to hear the case.

        3. If the appeal is to be heard, the chairperson will promptly give notice of the time, date, and place of the hearing to the parties involved. The hearing will be scheduled not more than 14 calendar days after notice to the student and instructor.

        4. The instructor will promptly make all pertinent grading records available to the college/school committee’s chairperson. In advance of the hearing, the chairperson may at his/her discretion make available to the student those records (or portions thereof) that he/she judges to be relevant in light of the student’s allegations.

    6. Conduct of College/School Grade Appeals Committee Hearing, General

      1. The hearing shall be closed, unless both parties agree in writing that it be open. The chairperson’s determination of the hearing location and the number of individuals that can be conveniently accommodated shall be final. The student and the instructor are both entitled to be accompanied at the hearing by advisors of their choice. Because the hearings are administrative and not judicial in nature, the advisors may not be lawyers. Both parties have the right to present evidence and witnesses in their behalf and to confront and question opposing witnesses.

      2. Under normal circumstances, if the duly notified student complainant does not appear for the hearing the complaint shall be dismissed, the case closed, and these actions not subject to further hearing or appeal. If, however, a duly notified faculty member does not appear, the hearing will continue on the presumption that there is no desire to challenge evidence or witnesses presented by the student.

      3. An official audio recording shall be made of each hearing and filed by the chairperson of the respective college/school committee for at least one year. The recording will be confidential and used only if further appeal is granted by the University Grade Appeals Committee or under legal compulsion.

      4. At the conclusion of the hearing, the committee may (by a majority vote of the committee membership) recommend changing the original grade. A written report of the committee’s decision shall be sent to both parties and the chairperson of the University Grade Appeals Committee no later than three days after the conclusion of the hearing. Either party may, within six class days of receipt of the decision, file a written notice of intent to request further appeal with the chairperson of the University Grade Appeals Committee. If no such notice is received by the chairperson within the six-day period, the decision shall not be subject to further hearing appeal. If, at that time, the instructor who originally gave the grade is not willing to initiate a recommended change, the chairperson of the University Grade Appeals Committee shall file the directed change with the registrar who shall record the new grade.

      5. The chairperson of each college/school committee will maintain a written record of all grade appeals heard in the college/school and provide an annual overview of the grade appeals process to the Provost.

    7. Appeal of a College/School Committee Decision
      1. Under certain specific circumstances (Sec III-E-7-b) either the student or the instructor may file a request for an appeal of the college/school grade appeals committee decision. If the appeal request is granted, the case will be heard by the University Grade Appeals Committee. The process may be initiated by filing a personally signed notice of appeal with the chairperson of the University Grade Appeals Committee within the six-day limit (Section III-E-6-d). The notice shall be accompanied by a written statement of the alleged procedural irregularities or new evidence, or a substantial enumeration of why the appellant believes the college/school committee decision is erroneous or unfair. Upon request, the respective college/school committee chairperson immediately will transmit the audio recording of the college/school hearing and any other items of evidence presented at the college/school hearing to the chairperson of the University Grade Appeals Committee. The decision of the University Grade Appeals Committee to grant or deny appeals from school committees shall be final.
      2. If the University Grade Appeals Committee finds, on the basis of the appellant’s written statement and other available evidence, that substantial procedural irregularities or inequities existed in the college/school hearing or that substantial new evidence has been uncovered, the University Grade Appeals Committee shall hear the case de novo. Additionally, the committee may, at its discretion, hear appeals from the college/school level, when the appellant’s statement substantiates to its satisfaction that the college/school decision may have been erroneous or unfair. If the University Grade Appeals Committee grants an appeal, the chairperson shall promptly give notice to both parties of the time, date, and place of hearing (which shall be held not less than five and, whenever practicable, not more than 10 days after the receipt of such notice), as well as providing them with a copy of the procedures and sequence of events to be followed in conducting the hearing.

    8. Conduct of University Grade Appeal Committee Hearing, General

      1. The appeal hearing shall be closed, unless both parties agree in writing for it to be open. The chairperson’s determination of the hearing location and the number of individuals that can be conveniently accommodated shall be final. The appellant and opposing parties are both entitled to be accompanied at the hearing by advisors of their choice. Because the hearings are administrative and not judicial in nature, the advisors may not be lawyers. If an appeal is heard on the basis of procedural irregularity or new evidence, both parties have the right to present evidence and witnesses in their behalf and to confront and question opposing witnesses. If, however, the University Grade Appeals Committee elects to hear an appeal on the grounds that the college/school grade appeals committee’s decision appears to be erroneous or unfair, it shall not accept additional evidence but shall consider only matters introduced at the college/school hearing. The audio record of the college/school hearing shall be made available for audition by both parties and the members of the University committee. Additionally, the committee may, at its discretion, have a transcript of the college/school hearing prepared. If a transcript is prepared, it will be safeguarded and used in the same fashion as audio records of hearings.

      2. If a duly notified appellant does not appear for the hearing, the committee may close the case and it will be subject to no further hearing or appeal. If the opposing party (having been duly notified) does not appear, the hearing will continue on the presumption that there is no desire to challenge evidence or witnesses that may be presented.

      3. An official audio recording shall be made of each hearing and kept by the chairperson of the University committee for at least one year. The recording will be confidential and used only under legal compulsion in civil court proceedings.

      4. After the University Grade Appeals Committee hears an appeal, it may (by a majority vote of the committee membership) recommend changing the original grade. A written report of the University Grade Appeals Committee’s decision shall be sent to both parties no later than 15 days after the conclusion of the hearing. If the instructor who originally gave the grade is not willing to initiate any recommended grade change, the chairperson of the University Grade Appeals Committee shall file the change with the registrar who shall record the new grade. The University Grade Appeals Committee’s decision is final, and shall not be subject to further hearing or appeal.

    9. Other Academic/Grade Appeal Jurisdictions

      1. Informal boards or committees may be established within academic departments to resolve grade grievances and appeals.

      2. Students involved in cases of alleged academic dishonesty may be subject to disciplinary penalties under Section III-B-2-a of the Regulations Governing Student Conduct, Disciplinary Proceedings, and Appeals.


Policy for Involuntary Withdrawal of Students

(Approved by the Board of Trustees, January 19-20, 1978, and revised by administrative approval on August 31, 1992)

Subject to the University’s duties under the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990 and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as amended (as they may be amended from time to time), a student may be asked to withdraw voluntarily or may be administratively withdrawn involuntarily from the University when, in the judgment of the dean of students and the director of the University Health Center, the student:

  1. Poses a direct threat to the health or safety of self or others; or

  2. Has interfered with the rights of other students, faculty, staff, or other members of the University community or with the exercise of any proper activities, functions, or duties of the University or its personnel, or has repeatedly harassed any member of the University community.

    The dean of students shall determine whether each individual case should be handled through this policy or through normal disciplinary procedures.

    1. A student may be requested in writing and/or orally (depending upon the urgency of the situation) to attend an informal meeting with the dean of students and director of the University Health Center for the purpose of determining whether the student should be withdrawn. Such a request will include a statement of the reasons for University concern. Parents, spouses, or other appropriate persons (i.e., faculty, roommates, heads of residence units, etc.) may be contacted either by the student or by the University for information and may, with the consent of the student, participate in the informal meeting. At the meeting the reasons for the University’s concern regarding the student will be clearly stated and the student will be given an opportunity to respond to these concerns. If after the meeting it is determined that the student should be permitted to continue his/her enrollment, the student will be so informed in writing.

    2. If after the informal meeting the dean of students and the director of the University Health Center decide that the student should be required to withdraw from the University and be permitted to reenter the University only with their approval, the student shall be informed of such decision and the reasons therefore. The student will receive a written notice of the decision and reasons as soon as administratively convenient. If the student agrees to voluntarily withdraw from the University on such conditions, regular withdrawal procedures will be followed. However, the student may be permitted to withdraw voluntarily without grades if in the judgment of the dean of students and the director of the University Health Center the circumstances warrant such action.

    3. If the student refuses to accept the decision of withdrawal reached by the dean of students and the director of the University Health Center, and refuses to withdraw from the University voluntarily, the student shall notify the dean of students of such refusal. He/She may then appeal the withdrawal decision to a committee appointed by the president of the University consisting of a faculty member, a student, and a University administrator other than a member of the staff of either the dean of students or director of the University Health Center. The committee shall hear the matter de novo after notice to the student and the dean of students and the director of the University Health Center. The issue to be determined by the committee shall be whether the student should be involuntarily withdrawn from the University pursuant to Section A(1) or A(2). The student and the dean of students and the director of the University Health Center may attend the hearing and present evidence and question witnesses. They may be represented by counsel. The committee shall make a written report containing its findings and conclusions. Copies of the report shall be furnished to the student, the dean of students, the director of the University Health Center, and the president. The decision of the committee shall be binding upon the student and the University.


Miscellaneous Conduct Regulations

  1. Guests in Student Residence Units

Within certain University-set limitations, residence units may determine the hours during which guests of the opposite sex may visit individual student rooms in undergraduate residence units. By secret ballot, a majority of the residents of the unit can approve a more restrictive policy. Any resident must be guaranteed his/her privacy, which takes priority over a guest. Individual students wishing to visit friends of the opposite sex in their rooms must do so in conformance with the approved plan in that particular residence unit. Check the guest hours policy posted in the residence unit.

Guest hours for students of the same sex are limited only by the policy of the particular residence unit.

  1. Financial Obligations

Students should make every effort to keep their credit good in the community for their own benefit and that of all students.

Students with past due financial obligations to the University may have a hold placed on their record. (See Scholastic Records, Holds, in Section D.) Degree candidates delinquent in financial obligations must remove such debts at least one week before the close of any term. Otherwise his/her diploma may be withheld, or if the degree is granted without knowledge of such delinquency, the degree may be revoked and the diploma cancelled.

  1. Absence from the University

For emergency purposes, it is important that the University be able to locate students at all times. All students are requested, therefore, to leave information with the office of their University residence unit and the officer of any other unit or at least a roommate when they are off campus and especially if they are going out of town. They are also encouraged to let their parents know when they will be away from campus for out-of-town travel.

  1. Change of Address

Students are required to notify the registrar of any change of campus or home address.

  1. Use of Alcoholic Beverages
    1. All Purdue students are responsible for complying with the Indiana state laws. Attention is called to the Indiana Alcoholic Beverages Law that states specifically:
      1. No person under 21 years of age may use or be in possession of alcoholic beverages.
      2. Persons 21 or over may not make alcoholic beverages available to minors.
      3. Misrepresentation of age for the purpose of purchasing alcoholic beverages is a violation of state law.
    2. In addition to Indiana state laws, the following University regulations apply:
      1. The University prohibits the possession, consumption, distribution, or sale of alcoholic beverages, as defined by state law, in or on any University property, with the following exceptions:

Personal possession and consumption of alcoholic beverages are permitted in Purdue Village (family apartments only), resident rooms in Young and Hawkins halls occupied exclusively by graduate students, and by registered occupants of guest rooms in the Union Club and Young and Hawkins halls, subject to compliance with all University regulations and applicable Indiana state laws.

Possession, consumption, distribution, and sale of alcoholic beverages are permitted, with advance approval by the Executive Vice President and Treasurer or his/her designee, in areas designated by the University and under the supervision of the Purdue Memorial Union or the Department of Hospitality and Tourism Management, subject to compliance with all University regulations and applicable Indiana state laws.

b. The University prohibits the serving of alcoholic beverages in any University undergraduate residence hall, and at any function on campus where a majority of attendees are projected by University management to be less than 21 years of age. All policies and procedures regarding the approval of and funding for a student organizational event must be complied with and completed before a request for service of alcoholic beverages will be considered (Approved by the Board of Trustees, May 31, 1997).

c. Members of recognized fraternities, sororities, and cooperative housing organizations shall be subject to the following conditions concerning the possession and consumption of alcoholic beverages on the premises of their houses.

  • Under no circumstances may alcoholic beverages be sold. Alcoholic beverages may not be available at any event where an admission fee is charged.

  • Alcoholic beverages may not be consumed outside the house.

  • Alcoholic beverages and containers for alcoholic beverages may not be displayed outside the house.

  • Alcoholic beverages may not be provided or consumed at any open event. (For purposes of these regulations, an event is open if verbal or written invitations are extended en masse to the general public or to an unreasonable large segment of the campus community [i.e., a number of invited guests greater than a host house can reasonably expect to accommodate, which is determined by the Office of the Dean of Students to be no more than three invited guests for each resident of the host house]. An event is closed if only members of the sponsoring organization[s] and their personally invited guests participate. There may be no more than four organizations participating in an event at a host house, regardless of the aforementioned three-to-one policy.)

  • All sponsoring organizations are equally responsible for open and closed events and for compliance with University regulations and applicable laws.

  1. See Executive Memorandum C-44, Alcohol and Drug-Free Campus and Workplace Policy (June 12, 1998).
  1. Use of Motor Vehicles, Bicycles, Skateboards, In-line Skates, and Traffic Regulations

    1. Anyone using motor vehicles or bicycles on the West Lafayette Campus is responsible for observing the detailed regulations regarding their use. Copies are available at the Parking Facilities Office. Before considering the use of a vehicle a student should be aware of the following basic regulations:

    2. In general, all parking during restricted hours (7 a.m.-5 p.m., M-F) is by permit or in the Grant Street Parking Garage. Some areas and spaces are restricted at all times.

    3. All motor vehicle and bicycle operators must comply with state and municipal laws or ordinances.

    4. Bicycles are not permitted inside any University building and must be parked in bicycle racks or pads provided for this purpose. (It is recommended that parked bicycles be locked.)

    5. Skateboards are prohibited on the north and south academic campuses. Skateboards and in-line skate usage is prohibited on any surface that could be damaged.

    6. Operators or owners of vehicles are subject to fines if they are in violation of the motor vehicle or bicycle regulations.

  2. Student Identification Cards
Every student who pays fees is issued a permanent identification card by the ID Card Office. The student identification card permits him/her to attend various events, check books out of the library, access residence halls and dining facilities, establish charge accounts, ride CityBus, etc., where his/her identification as a student is required. These identification cards are University documents and may not be altered in any way. Any defacement or alteration of the identification card is a violation of University regulations and is subject to disciplinary action. The identification card is a personal document and should never be out of its owner’s possession. If the identification card is lost, it can be replaced by the ID Card Office. A replacement fee will be charged.
  1. All students are subject to University policy V.III, “Intellectual Property”, as amended from time to time.

  2. Use of Copyrighted Materials

All members of the Purdue University community are responsible for complying with the United States Copyright Law and with Purdue University’s Executive Memorandum B-53, as amended from time to time, which governs the use of copyrighted works for educational and research purposes.

Copyright is a federal law that protects creative works such as Web sites, CDs, DVDs, audio and visual works, computer programs, books, and journals. Copyright allows authors to control the use of their works for a limited period of time. Authors or the owners of the copyrighted work have exclusive rights to the work. It is their decision as to whether the work can be copied and/or distributed. Violating the copyright owner’s rights is considered copyright infringement and may be subject to legal action.

Works are protected for a limited period of time but once that time period has expired, the work becomes part of the public domain. The public can then freely use the works without paying royalties or obtaining permission from the copyright holder.

Works created on or after January 1, 1978, are protected for a term of the life of the author plus 70 years. If the work is a product of a corporate author, then the protection is for the shorter of 95 years from first publication or 120 years from creation. Works that were published prior to 1923 no longer have copyright protection and are in the public domain. Any work created or published from 1923 to the present time should be considered still protected by the copyright law.

There are exemptions to the copyright law that allow use of a work without seeking permission. One of the most utilized exemptions in higher education is the fair use exemption. This exemption is a four factor test that weighs whether the use of a work is fair under certain circumstances. If the use is not fair and no other exemption is applicable to the specific use of the work, then permission from the copyright holder must be granted before the work can be used.

For further information on the copyright law, please visit the University Copyright Office’s Web site at www.lib.purdue.edu/uco.

  1. Commercial Note Taking in Classes (University Senate Document 03-9, April 19, 2004.)

As used in this paragraph, the term “instructor” is defined as the individual who authored the material being presented as part of the course.

Among the materials that may be protected by copyright law are the lectures, notes, and other material presented in class or as part of the course. Always assume the materials presented by an instructor are protected by copyright unless the instructor has stated otherwise. Students enrolled in, and authorized visitors to, Purdue University courses are permitted to take notes, which they may use for individual/group study or for other non-commercial purposes reasonably arising from enrollment in the course or the University generally.

Notes taken in class are, however, generally considered to be “derivative works” of the instructor’s presentations and materials, and they are thus subject to the instructor’s copyright in such presentations and materials. No individual is permitted to sell or otherwise barter notes, either to other students or to any commercial concern, for a course without the express written permission of the course instructor. To obtain permission to sell or barter notes, the individual wishing to sell or barter the notes must be registered in the course or must be an approved visitor to the class. Course instructors may choose to grant or not grant such permission at their own discretion, and may require a review of the notes prior to their being sold or bartered. If they do grant such permission, they may revoke it at any time, if they so choose.


Commitment to Freedom of Expression

Because Purdue University (the “University”) is committed to free and open inquiry in all matters, it guarantees all members of the University community the broadest possible latitude to speak, write, listen, challenge, and learn. Except insofar as limitations on that freedom are necessary to the functioning of the University, the University fully respects and supports the freedom of all members of the University community “to discuss,” in the words of former University of Chicago President Robert M. Hutchins, “any problem that presents itself.”

Of course, the ideas of different members of the University community will often and quite naturally conflict. But it is not the proper role of the University to attempt to shield individuals from ideas and opinions they find unwelcome, disagreeable, or even deeply offensive. Although the University greatly values civility, and although all members of the University community share in the responsibility for maintaining a climate of mutual respect, concerns about civility and mutual respect can never be used as a justification for closing off discussion of ideas, however offensive or disagreeable those ideas may be to some members of our community.

The freedom to debate and discuss the merits of competing ideas does not, of course, mean that individuals may say whatever they wish, wherever they wish. The University may restrict expression, for example, that violates the law, that falsely defames a specific individual, that constitutes a genuine threat or harassment, that unjustifiably invades substantial privacy or confidentiality interests, or that is otherwise directly incompatible with the functioning of the University. In addition, the University may reasonably regulate the time, place, and manner of expression to ensure that it does not disrupt the ordinary activities of the University. But these are narrow exceptions to the general principle of freedom of expression, and it is vitally important that these exceptions never be used in a manner that is inconsistent with the University’s commitment to a completely free and open discussion of ideas.

In a word, the University’s fundamental commitment is to the principle that debate or deliberation may not be suppressed because the ideas put forth are thought by some or even by most members of the University community to be offensive, unwise, immoral, or wrong-headed. It is for the individual members of the University community, not for the University as an institution, to make those judgments for themselves, and to act on those judgments not by seeking to suppress speech, but by openly and vigorously contesting the ideas that they oppose. Indeed, fostering the ability of members of the University community to engage in such debate and deliberation in an effective and responsible manner is an essential part of the University’s educational mission.

As a corollary to the University’s commitment to protect and promote free expression, members of the University community must also act in conformity with the principle of free expression. Although members of the University community are free to criticize and contest the views expressed on campus, and to criticize and contest speakers who are invited to express their views on campus, they may not obstruct or otherwise interfere with the freedom of others to express views they reject or even loathe. To this end, the University has a solemn responsibility not only to promote a lively and fearless freedom of debate and deliberation, but also to protect that freedom when others attempt to restrict it.


Statement of Integrity and Code of Conduct

Preamble

Purdue University has a tradition of ethical conduct spanning its history. As a land-grant institution, we demonstrate our responsiveness to our constituencies and extend to them access to our knowledge resources. We nurture relationships with other partners in education who support our vision or join us to foster common interests. We integrate our mission with our responsibilities. We contribute our knowledge resources impartially in serving our public purposes. As faculty, students, staff, and administrators, we are a community of dedicated learners, scholars, professionals, and practitioners - all contributing our talents to uphold our standards, and improve ourselves and the broader community in which we live and work. Our responsibilities and obligations toward the advancement of learning, discovery, and engagement in the University and in Indiana extend to our nation and the world. This statement of integrity is meant to provide an overarching declaration that informs specific policies and procedures regarding conduct, enforcement, and accountability. Such policies and procedures either exist in official University documents or will be developed as necessary.

Statement

At Purdue, integrity is indispensable to our mission. We act with honesty and adhere to the highest standards of moral and ethical values and principles through our personal and professional behavior. We demonstrate our understanding of these values and principles and uphold them in every action and decision. Trust and trustworthiness go hand in hand with how we conduct ourselves, as we sustain a culture that is based upon ethical conduct. We expect our actions to be consistent with our words, and our words to be consistent with our intentions. We accept our responsibilities, share leadership in a democratic spirit, and subject ourselves to the highest standards of public trust. We hold ourselves accountable for our words and our actions.

We champion freedom of expression. To ensure our integrity, we safeguard academic freedom, open inquiry, and debate in the best interests of education, enrichment, and our personal and professional development. We embrace human and intellectual diversity and inclusiveness. We uphold the highest standards of fairness, act as responsible citizens, respect equality and the rights of others, and treat all individuals with dignity.

To fulfill our goals as a learning community, we insist that the objectives of student learning are not compromised. We treat all students equitably, and our evaluations of learning achievements are impartial based on demonstrated academic performance. As students, we understand that learning is the most important goal and we embrace ethical values and principles, and reject academic dishonesty in all our learning endeavors. In the realm of new discoveries, we place the highest value upon truth and accuracy. We acknowledge the contributions of others. We place a higher value on expanding and sharing knowledge than on recognition or ownership.

We work diligently drawing from the strong work ethic of our state of Indiana and are committed to always acting in the best interests of the University. We pledge to make wise use of our resources and to be good stewards of financial, capital, and human resources. We operate within the letter and spirit of the law and prescribed policies, and strive to avoid impropriety or conflict of interest.

As members of the Purdue community, we demonstrate unyielding and uncompromised integrity in support of the highest standards of excellence for the University. As individuals, we all contribute to this Purdue standard of integrity as an exemplary model for all universities.


Statement of Values

We Are Purdue

Boilermakers, who are we?

We are a family that embodies integrity through the practice of honesty, humility, and accountability.

We are a unified community that respects each other by embracing diversity, promoting inclusion, and encouraging freedom of thought and speech.

We are innovators discovering new ideas and solutions that will foster a positive global impact.

We are honored to share our long-lasting traditions instilling a legacy of loyalty and pride within ourselves and others.

We are determined to build ourselves and our community, always One Brick Higher.

We are ever grateful ever true, WE are ONE PURDUE!

 

Six Pillars of Purdue

INTEGRITY, RESPECT, HONOR, INCLUSION, INNOVATION, GROWTH


Purdue University Student Disability Grievance Procedures

Introduction

Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act (1973) were intended to prevent discrimination against individuals with disabilities. They provide that:

”No otherwise qualified person with a disability in the United States…shall, solely by reason of…disability, be excluded from the participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity sponsored by a public entity.”

In addition to the non-discrimination requirement, public entities must adopt and publish a student grievance procedure, which is an internal course of action that provides for timely and equitable resolution of complaints alleging a violation of U.S. Department of Justice regulations related to the implementation of Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (1990) or Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act (1973).

The Disability Resource Center has adopted a grievance process providing for the equitable resolution of complaints, within a reasonable time, for students with disabilities alleging violation(s) of their rights under the ADA and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act.

Disability Grievance Procedure (Updated December 2014)

The Disability Resource Center (DRC) has the responsibility of determining a student’s need for accommodation. This determination is made through a two-part process of an intake interview and reviewing documentation of the disability. If the DRC staff determine a student is eligible for accommodations, the DRC is responsible for coordinating the accommodations with the student and the instructor and third party service providers. 

If the student was denied accommodations, believes the final accommodation(s) provided are not reasonable, or the accommodations were not provided as agreed to, or if the student believes for any other reason that he or she has been subjected to unlawful discrimination or violation of rights with respect to the granting or implementation of their request for accommodations under the ADA and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the student should follow the procedure below. During the grievance process, any academic accommodations or services that have been put into place will continue uninterrupted. DRC recognizes that it is important to address the student’s concerns promptly. The goal of all University personnel should be to accomplish each step of this grievance process as quickly as possible.

  • Informal Grievance Procedure: The student may first make an appointment to meet with the Director of the Disability Resource Center.  At this stage (the “Informal Grievance Process”), the Director will review the matter, allowing all interested parties an opportunity to submit relevant information, statements and documentation. The Director will make a decision regarding the informal grievance within seven (7) working days of the meeting with the student and attempt to notify the student immediately. The Director’s decision will be in writing and may be sent to the student by either U.S. Mail or by electronic mail. If the student’s dispute involves a decision of the DRC Director, the student may forego the Informal Grievance Process and file a Formal Grievance (as defined below).
  • Formal Grievance Procedure If the student is not satisfied with the result of the Informal Grievance Process with the DRC Director, or if the student’s dispute involves a decision of the Director, the student may initiate a formal grievance (the “Formal Grievance”) by requesting and filing a formal Disability Grievance form. The grievance form may be obtained from DRC or online.  The form should be completed and submitted to the Director of Student Success within 21 working days of the date of the DRC Director’s decision regarding the Informal Grievance Process or 30 working days of the disputed incident, whichever date is later.
    1. After the Director of Student Success receives the grievance form, s/he or his/her designee from Student Success will conduct a formal investigation of the student’s Formal Grievance. This review will involve meeting with the student, and may also involve meeting with DRC staff, faculty members, and/or other concerned staff members. The student has a right to present information in person to the Director of Student Success or designee. A written decision will be issued by the Director within 30 working days of receipt of the grievance form.
    2. Alternatively, the Director has the sole discretion to convene a Grievance Committee comprised of three professional staff or faculty members who will hear the Formal Grievance and recommend a course of action. The final written decision will be issued by the Director within 30 working days of receipt of the grievance form.
    3. The student may request a review of the final written decision of the Director of Student Success by the University’s ADA Coordinator in the Office for Institutional Equity within 10 working days of the student’s receipt of the Director’s final written decision.  The Coordinator will file a written decision within 10 working days of the request to review.  The decision of the ADA Coordinator is final.