Sep 18, 2021  
2020-2021 University Catalog 
    
2020-2021 University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Academic Regulations



Academic Year and Calendar

A. Academic Calendar

(University Senate Document 90-30, April 22, 1991, University Senate Document 12-1, November 19, 2012)

  1. Courses are scheduled during the academic year and summer session. The academic year shall consist of two 16-week semesters. Summer session(s) may be one 4-week and one 8-week or two 6-week or other configurations as approved by the Provost’s Office. In each semester/session, classes shall begin with the first instructional period of the first day.
  2. In each semester/session, classes shall begin with the first instructional period of the first day.
    1. The calendar for students enrolled in the fourth year of veterinary medicine will comprise 12 blocks of approximately one month duration. The starting dates for the blocks will be chosen so that the end of the 12th block coincides with the end of the second semester (University Senate Document 73-15, March 18, 1977).
    2. The second semester for fifth-year pharmacy students will begin on the first Monday in January and end the 18th following Saturday. During this semester, each of these students will be scheduled for two six-week externships and one three-week clerkship.
  3. The first semester shall begin on either the third or fourth Monday of August, be in recess Monday and Tuesday of the eighth week, and Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, and Saturday of Thanksgiving week, and classes will end on the 17th following Saturday, which shall not occur after the 20th day of December. The second semester shall begin on either the first or second Monday of January, which shall not occur prior to the seventh day of January, be in recess during the tenth week, and end on the 17th following Saturday (University Senate Document 96-4, February 17, 1997).
  4. The summer session shall begin on the next Monday following the spring commencement and will be comprised of one 4-week and one 8-week, or two 6-week module(s) or other configurations as approved by the Provost Office. Courses may be scheduled during any one or any combination of modules throughout the 12-week period. There shall be no classes on Memorial Day, the last Monday in May, or on July 4, nor on the nearest class day when July 4 is not a regular class day.(University Senate Document 96-4, February 17, 1997).
  5. Faculty shall enter grades as completed, but no later than 5 p.m. on the second working day after the end of the respective academic semester/session.
  6. Commencement will be held as follows: First Semester: first Sunday following the end of the first semester; Second Semester: next subsequent weekend after the end of the second semester; Summer Session: first Saturday following the end of the last summer module.
  7. The faculties at regional campuses shall be free to establish their own calendar dates.

B. Final Examinations

(University Senate Document 84-12, March 25, 1985)

  1. In regular semesters, the final examination period shall consist of six scheduled days comprising the 16th week of the semester. The two-hour class meetings during the six days of the final examination period will be scheduled at the discretion of the Educational Policy Committee on the advice of the Office of the Registrar as, at most, 30 two-hour periods (five periods per day, including evenings). Upon request, a single coursewide examination will be scheduled for any course. In the summer session, the final examination schedule shall be appropriately scaled to meet the demand. It shall be scheduled at the discretion of the Educational Policy Committee on the advice of the Office of the Registrar in, at most, 12 two-hour periods on the last three days of the session (four periods per day, excluding evenings).
  2. Each class will be scheduled for a two-hour meeting during the final examination period. Excepted are those courses classified as individual study, clinic, student teaching, industrial experience (co-op), or research and those offered for zero credit. However, any such course will be included in the schedule upon the specific request of the appropriate schedule deputy. If no educational purpose will be served by any type of meeting during the 16th week because the educational objectives of the course have been achieved, a department may dismiss this class meeting during the 16th week.
  3. Two weeks after the beginning of any regular semester and one week after the beginning of the summer session, schedule deputies shall inform the Office of the Registrar of the courses requiring coursewide examinations. It will be the responsibility of the department head or, where appropriate, the school head to inform the Office of the Registrar which courses within the department or school will not need a meeting. A schedule implementing Section B will then be developed by the Office of the Registrar in consultation with the Educational Policy Committee. Guiding principles include
  • Minimize the number of direct student examination conflicts.
  • Minimize the number of students who have more than two examinations on the same day.
  • Minimize the number of students who have consecutive (back-to-back) examinations.
  1. No student shall be required to take more than two examinations on one day.
  2. The Office of the Provost shall implement a procedure to inform faculty and students of the academic regulations governing end-of-semester exams and activities each semester to coincide with the release of the final examination class schedule.
  3. Students scheduled for more than two examinations in one calendar day are entitled to reschedule any examinations in excess of two. Similarly, students faced with a direct exam conflict are entitled to reschedule either examination. It is the responsibility of the student to make the necessary arrangements before the last week of regularly scheduled classes. Course instructors shall not penalize a student who chooses to reschedule an examination under these options (University Senate Document 90-22, March 25, 1991).
  4. Regional campuses may modify these provisions to meet local differences through established procedures of the local faculty governing bodies or, lacking these, the regional campus chancellor or designee.
  5. The final examination period is intended for the end-of-semester examination. No examination or quiz may be given during the week (three days in summer session) preceding the final examination period of the semester (examinations for laboratory, intensive, or minicourses excluded). It will be the responsibility of the department head or, where appropriate, the school head to ensure that none of the departmental or school faculty use the week (three days in summer session) preceding the final examination period to administer an examination.
  6. Comprehensive final examinations (examinations for laboratory, intensive or minicourses excluded) are prohibited except during the regular final examination periods of the last week of the semester.

C. Summer Sessions Work

Regular work offered in the summer sessions shall be equivalent in method, content, and credit value to the work of the academic year, regular class and laboratory periods being increased proportionately.


Academic Programs

A. Unit of Credit 

The semester hour shall be the unit of University academic credit that shall represent approximately three hours of work per week by an average student throughout a normal semester, or its equivalent in total work for short courses and summer sessions. Any reference to credit hours, course credits, etc., shall be understood as referring to semester hours.

B. Definitions Relating to Academic Requirements

  1. Transfer Credit is credit earned at another accredited college or university and accepted by Purdue. The University will accept transfer credit only for work done at those institutions fully approved by a regional accrediting association of secondary schools and colleges or those whose regional accreditation designation is Associate/Vocational-Technical (A/V) when agreements with academic departments exist that specify courses or blocks of credit that will transfer into specific Purdue University degree programs. In addition to regional association approval, certain programs may require accreditation by professional organizations and/or societies before credit will be considered for transfer.

Students participating in college credit courses that are taught concurrently for high school and college credit during the regular school day by local secondary teachers must validate the credit through the subject department.

The determination of use of transfer credit in part or in full to satisfy graduation requirements is the responsibility of the school head or his/her designated representative, in accordance with the regulations of the University faculty (University Senate Document 87-11, March 28, 1988).

  1. Dual Credit is credit earned for a college course that is used as a part of a high school’s curriculum and is taught concurrently for high school credit and college credit by a secondary school employee.

If a Purdue course is to be taught for dual credit, it must be approved by the sponsoring department at the University in the same manner it approves new courses - including approval by the school if the school requires it - and it must be offered in collaboration with an accredited high school. In addition, departmentally designated Purdue faculty must endorse and supervise the teacher as well as approve the syllabus, grading standards, and examinations.

For students to be granted credit at Purdue for dual-credit courses offered by other postsecondary institutions, faculty must validate the credit earned elsewhere through the Purdue department responsible for the subject matter via one of the following means:

  1. Faculty must verify that the student has earned a grade of at least C in a higher-level course taken at Purdue that has as a prerequisite the course for which credit is being sought; or

  2. Faculty must certify that the student has performed satisfactorily either on an appropriate standardized achievement examination or Purdue departmental advanced-credit examination or has earned a grade of at least C on a current comprehensive final examination for the Purdue course in which the student wishes to gain credit; or

  3. Faculty must affirm that a dual-credit course offered at a specific high school by another postsecondary institution is essentially the same as a specific Purdue course by approving at least the syllabus and the examinations. In addition, faculty must confirm that the student earned a grade of at least C in the course (University Senate Document 95-8, April 22, 1996).

  1. Directed Credit is academic credit awarded by the University on bases other than a student’s enrollment in and satisfactory completion of a course.

A student eligible to receive directed credit shall be a student newly admitted or currently enrolled in the University who has not received a grade or directed grade in the course, other than a grade of W.

Directed credit may be established by any of the following methods:

  1. Credit by Examination. Credit awarded to a student on the basis of achievement in a Purdue departmental proficiency examination.

  2. Departmental Credit. Credit for a course offered by a department and awarded to a student on the basis of substantially equivalent experience. May be granted only by the head of that department or his/her designated representative.

  3. Achievement Credit. Credit awarded to a student on the basis of demonstrated achievement in a nationally administered college-level examination (University Senate Document 79-5, October 15, 1979).

  1. To Substitute is to replace a course required in a specific curriculum by another course specified by the head of the school in charge of that curriculum or his/her designated representative.

  2. To Excuse is to replace a course required in a specific curriculum by an equal number of credit hours in courses not specified.

  3. To Exempt is to waive a course required for graduation together with its equivalent hours.

    1. Undergraduate students, without respect to the school in which they are enrolled, may be exempted by the University faculty from any general requirement that has been established by the University faculty.

    2. An undergraduate student in a specific school may be exempted by the faculty of that school from any requirement established by that school faculty.

  4. Advanced Placement is the assignment of entering students to courses beyond the first course or courses in a normal sequence without allowing credit for courses not taken.

  5. Advanced Standing means that an entering student has credit for or exemption from one or more courses.

C. Academic Classification of Undergraduate Students

  1. A student at Purdue University is any person who has been admitted to the University and who is currently enrolled in one or more courses for which there will be a permanent academic record.

  2. Each student shall be admitted and identified as one of the following:

    1. Degree. A student who has been admitted and registered for the purpose of earning a degree.

    2. Nondegree (University Senate Document 88-17, April 24, 1989). A student who is not in a program of study leading to a degree. A nondegree student has a limited purpose for his/her registration. A nondegree student is enrolled for personal or professional enrichment or to strengthen his/her academic background to gain degree-seeking status. Such a student must provide evidence that he/she is qualified to enroll in the course(s) he/she desires. An applicant currently enrolled in high school will be admitted as a non-degree student only when all of the following conditions are met:

      1. The student ranks in at least the top half of the high school class and maintains an above-average grade(s) in subjects related to the course(s) in which he/she wishes to enroll, and

      2. The high school guidance counselor or principal has signed a recommendation for the student and has included a current copy of the high school transcript for review by members of the admissions committee. A nondegree student is generally limited to enrolling in a maximum of seven hours per semester during the fall and spring semesters, and is generally limited to enrolling in no more than four hours during the summer session; however, a nondegree student who has earned a bachelor’s degree is eligible to enroll on a full-time basis. In order to continue to register as a nondegree student, he/she must meet the same minimum grade index required of degree students. A student may apply no more than 18 semester hours of work completed as a nondegree student toward an undergraduate degree at Purdue University. The dean of the school to which the student applies may determine which credits will be accepted toward a degree in that school. A department may limit the number of nondegree students acceptable in any course (University Senate Document 87-13, April 25, 1988, revised by University Senate Document 02-6, February 17, 2003).

  3. A student’s academic classification for an associate or bachelor’s degree shall be classified by numerals 1, 2, 3, etc., corresponding to the total number of credit hours of college work earned.

Total Credits Earned

Semester Classification

Status

14.0 or less

1

First-year Student

15 to 29

2

30 to 44

3

Sophomore

45 to 59

4

60 to 74

5

Junior

75 to 89

6

90 to 104

7

Senior

105 or more

8

  1. The starting date for degree requirements for an approved curriculum is the Fall semester of the academic year.  When a new or revised curriculum or degree requirement is approved by a college or school, the new requirements shall not apply to the students currently enrolled in the University.  This limitation will expire 6 academic years after the new/revised curriculum is adopted.  Current students may elect to use the new/revised curriculum or degree requirements for graduation on written request to the school or college.  Curriculum or degree requirement changes made to satisfy requirements for professional accreditation may have a starting date in the semester in which the changes are made (University Senate Document 09-6, April 19, 2010).

D. Transfer of Students between Curricula

(University Senate Document 71-11, January 17, 1972; University Senate Document 09-6, April 19, 2010)

A student who wishes to transfer from one curriculum to another within the University shall:

  1. Prepare the prescribed request form.

  2. Secure the approval of the deans or their designee of both colleges/schools concerned.

  3. Submit the completed form at the Office of the Registrar before the end of the second week of the effective term. Forms received after the second week will be effective for the next term. The request form may be honored after the second week if it is accompanied by a special petition setting forth the extenuating circumstances. Any student who has been inactive for three consecutive semesters may request a change of curricula as part of his/her application for reentry.

E. Transfer of Credits between Curricula

(University Senate Document 09-6, April 19, 2010)

When a student transfers from one curriculum to another leading to a different associate or baccalaureate degree, the courses that have been completed and are acceptable in satisfying the degree requirements of the new curriculum shall be determined by an authorized representative of the dean of the school into which the student wishes to transfer.  The starting date limitations on changes of degree requirements and curricula stated in section C 4 apply to transfer of credits between curricula.

F. Credit in Courses by Examination

(University Senate Document 74-15 [amended], April 21, 1975)

The establishment of credit by examination is encouraged in order to expedite the education of qualified students. Toward this end, each instructional department shall determine which of its courses are available for credit by examination and shall establish procedures to determine the eligibility of candidates, to administer, and to grade such examinations. The examinations shall be as comprehensive as those given in the course and shall be graded as satisfactory (performance comparable to that expected of students who receive A, B, or C in the course) or unsatisfactory. The registrar shall establish forms and procedures to assure proper distribution of results, and for satisfactory performance, shall record credit for the course on the student’s record. The testing coordinator in the Office of the Dean of Students shall schedule and administer written examinations if requested by the instructional department.

The registrar shall collect from each department a list of courses that are available for credit by examination. The registrar shall also make this information available to current students, prospective students, and academic advisors. In addition, each department shall make available information about courses appropriate for credit by examination and shall identify faculty members responsible for administering these examinations.

A student eligible to request examination for credit in a course shall be a newly admitted student or a currently enrolled student who has not received a grade or directed grade in the course, other than a grade of W.

Requests to take an examination for credit normally shall originate with the eligible student who must obtain the consent of his/her advisor and the approval of the instructional department; however, newly admitted students whose previous records indicate high degrees of competence in particular areas may be invited and authorized to take specific examinations at the discretion of the instructional department and the academic advisor. Any student receiving such invitation or approval must meet the examination schedule of the instructional department. In consenting to requests from currently enrolled students, the advisor and the instructional department shall be guided by their assessment of the student’s need and ability as demonstrated by performance in conventional coursework at Purdue.

G. Courses Taken in Postbaccalaureate or Teacher License Status

(Graduate Council, April 16, 1992)

Although there is no limit to the number of course credit hours that an individual may accumulate while registered in either of these classifications, no more than 12 total hours of credit earned in postbaccalaureate or teacher license status may be used on a graduate plan of study. However, if an application to a graduate degree program is approved during the session in which a person is enrolled for the 12th credit hour as a postbaccalaureate or teacher license student, all credits taken prior to and during that session will be eligible for inclusion on a plan of study for a graduate degree program, providing the courses are appropriate to the degree program and the courses and grades are acceptable first to the department and then to the Graduate School.

H. Excess Undergraduate Credits

(University Senate Document 10-9, April 25, 2011)

Graduate course credits earned while an undergraduate at Purdue University or other accredited institutions of higher learning may be applied toward an advanced degree if these credits are in excess of any requirements for the baccalaureate degree. Such credits must be certified as available for graduate credit by the institution from which the student received his/her baccalaureate degree, but will be accepted only if:

  1. The student had junior or senior standing when taking the course,

  2. The student received a grade of B or better (work taken under the pass/not-pass option is not acceptable),

  3. The course was designated as a graduate course, and

  4. If the work is completed satisfactorily on this basis, the academic advisor (or candidate coordinator, or other designee) shall then complete the Academic Record Change Form 350, which indicates that the course may be used for graduate credit, and submit the form to the registrar, along with the grade reported, at the close of the student’s final semester. The academic advisor’s (or candidate coordinator’s, or designee’s) signature will attest to the fact that the credit is in excess of that required for the baccalaureate degree so that the registrar can then enter the notation available for graduate credit on the student’s record.

The sum of credits earned as undergraduate excess and the credit earned in post baccalaureate and teacher license status that can be used on a plan of study is limited to 12 credit hours except as stated in Section II-G above. Any additional conditions under which excess undergraduate credit may be used for graduate credit are determined by the various departments (Graduate Council, April 16, 1992).

I. Correspondence Courses

(University Senate Document 90-29, April 22, 1991)

  1. All Purdue courses that are proposed for correspondence credit, including existing courses, must be approved through a school’s normal approval process before being offered. Correspondence courses are defined as those courses that are characterized by instructor-student interaction that occurs primarily outside the traditional classroom setting.

  2. Courses offered for credit will be taught by instructors approved by the department offering such courses. Whether a correspondence course is to be considered a normal teaching responsibility or an overload will be at the department’s discretion.

  3. Courses offered as correspondence courses will count toward degree requirements the same as any other approved course within the curriculum. Limitations on correspondence courses applicable toward a degree will be determined through a school’s normal course and degree approval process.

  4. Correspondence courses taken for credit will require the individual to be admitted to the University and officially registered for the course. Fees will be assessed separately from any other fees in accordance with the current standard per-credit-hour fee structure for the University or, if warranted, a special fee structure for the course will be requested through the Office of the Executive Vice President and Treasurer. The grade in the correspondence course will be incorporated in the computation of the scholastic index for the student, and a permanent academic record will be maintained.

  5. The beginning date and time period allotted, up to one calendar year, for a correspondence course will be established by the department and recorded by the registrar. A student withdrawing during the first half of the time period established may be assigned a grade of W, WF, or WN by the instructor. Within one calendar year of enrollment a final grade will be reported to the registrar by the instructor for each enrolled student. If, due to extenuating circumstances, an incomplete grade is issued, the established regulations for removal or assignment of a permanent grade will apply.

  6. Departments may wish to offer non-credit correspondence courses under an alternate course number that does not require the individual to be admitted to Purdue. No permanent academic record will be maintained, and fees will be established in accordance with the policies administered by the Office of the Executive Vice President and Treasurer.


Degrees and Requirements

Conferring of Degrees

Appropriate degrees may be granted at the conclusion of each regular semester and summer session of the academic year (University Senate Document 89-5, November 13, 1989). In addition, degrees may be granted on other dates, providing the students are members of a group working on a common degree program. The degrees awarded during each academic year at various campuses and on the various dates will be presented to the Board of Trustees for approval in accordance with lists of recipients that shall be provided by the registrar for entry into the permanent record of the board (Board of Trustees minutes: October 27, 1924; January 16, 1925; March 15, 1974).

Requirements for Degrees

A. Associate Degree

To gain an associate degree from Purdue University, a student shall satisfy the following requirements:

  1. The completion, either by resident coursework, as directed credit, or by credit accepted from another institution, of the plan of study underlying the degree. Deans of schools may refuse to accept as credit toward graduation any course that was completed 10 or more years previously. Former students shall be notified immediately of all such decisions upon reentering. Substitutions of courses required for graduation may be made by the dean of the school conferring the degree.

  2. Resident study at Purdue University for at least two semesters and the enrollment in and completion of at least 32 semester hours of coursework required and approved for the completion of the degree. Students normally are expected to complete the entire second year in residence; however, with the approval of the dean of the school concerned, students who have at least three semesters of resident study may complete not to exceed 16 semester hours of the second year in another approved college or university. For the purpose of this rule, two summer sessions may be considered as equivalent to one semester.

  3. Registration, either in residence or in absentia, as a candidate for the desired degree during the semester (or summer session) immediately preceding its conferment.

  4. A minimum cumulative GPA of 2.00 shall be required for graduation (University Senate Document 93-2, November 29, 1993). (See Academic Regulations and Procedures: Grades and Grade Reports, sections A and J.) A student who has completed all other requirements for an associate degree, but has failed to meet the quality requirements may register for additional courses with the approval of an authorized representative of the dean of his/her school after a review of his/her record. The additional courses that the student may take after meeting all quantity requirements shall not exceed 10 credit hours. Credit in these additional courses must be established within three years of the date on which all degree requirements except the minimum cumulative GPA were met. The student will be considered as having met the quality requirement for graduation if his/her graduation index, including the above extra courses, meets the quality standard in effect at the time when all other graduation requirements were satisfied.

B. Baccalaureate Degree

To gain a baccalaureate degree from Purdue University, a student shall satisfy the following requirements:
  1. The completion, either by resident course work, as directed credit, or by credit accepted from another institution, of the plan of study underlying the degree. Deans of schools may refuse to accept as credit toward graduation any course that was completed 10 or more years previously. Former students shall be notified immediately of all such decisions upon reentering. Substitutions of courses required for graduation may be made by the dean of the school conferring the degree.

  2. Resident study at Purdue University for at least two semesters and the enrollment in and completion of at least 32 semester hours of coursework required and approved for the completion of the degree. These courses are expected to be at least junior-level courses.

    Students normally are expected to complete the senior year in residence; however, with the approval of the dean of the school concerned, a student who has had four semesters of resident study may complete the last year or a portion of it at another college or university, provided that the number of semester hours of credit to be taken does not exceed 25 percent of the total hours required for the degree. The foregoing stipulations do not apply to students who earn credit elsewhere through a contract or arrangement entered into by the University or one of its academic units.

  3. Registration, either in residence or absentia, as a candidate for the desired degree during the semester (or summer session) immediately preceding its conferment.

  4. A minimum cumulative GPA of 2.00 shall be required for graduation. (See Sections VII-J and VII-A.)

    A student who has completed all other requirements for a bachelor’s degree but has failed to meet the quality requirements may register for additional courses with the approval of an authorized representative of the dean of his/her school after a review of his/her record. The additional courses that the student may take after meeting all quantity requirements shall not exceed 20 credit hours. Such a student may take in another approved college or university not more than 9 of the 20 credit hours permitted, provided such courses are approved in advance in writing by an authorized representative of the dean of his/her school. A copy of such approval must be filed in the Office of the Registrar. Credit in these additional courses must be established within five years of the date on which all degree requirements except the minimum cumulative GPA were met. The student will be considered as having met the quality requirements for graduation if his/her cumulative GPA, including the above extra courses, meets the quality standards in effect at the time when all other graduation requirements were satisfied.

  5. The demonstration of satisfactory knowledge of the English language, with particular reference to composition and spelling. Junior and senior students who are determined by the Office of Writing Review to be markedly deficient in English shall be assigned to a noncredit English course, which they will be required to pass before graduation.

C. Advanced Degrees

Requirements for the several master’s degrees, for the Educational Specialist, and for Doctor of Philosophy degrees are established by the Graduate Council and are stated in the Graduate School Bulletin and the Policies and Procedures Manual for Administering Graduate Student Programs.

D. Professional Degree - Doctor of Pharmacy

To gain the degree Doctor of Pharmacy, a student shall complete the required professional curriculum.

E. Professional Degree - Doctor of Veterinary Medicine

To gain the degree Doctor of Veterinary Medicine, a student shall satisfy the following requirements:
  1. The satisfactory completion of the prescribed preprofessional curriculum of two or more years prior to admission to the School of Veterinary Medicine.
  2. The satisfactory completion of the four-year professional curriculum in veterinary medicine.

F. Multiple Degree Programs

A student who will be completing the requirements for two or more degree programs simultaneously may be eligible to be registered as a candidate for more than one degree according to the following criteria:
  1. If the degree programs are in different schools, two (or more) degrees may be awarded upon special request approved by the deans of the schools concerned and filed with the registrar at the beginning of the semester or session in which the degrees are to be awarded.
  2. If the degree programs are in the same school and lead to different degrees, the appropriate degrees shall be awarded.
  3. If the degree programs are in the same school and lead to the same degree, only one degree shall be awarded. The academic record shall reflect multiple fields of study, as appropriate.

G. Diplomas

A diploma is a document listing the school awarding the degree, the type of degree being awarded, the campus awarding the degree, and the date the degree was conferred.

An official transcript or a complete academic record of degree posting will include the type of degree; cooperative education or honors curriculum; any fields of study, minors, or specializations; campus where the degree was awarded; and the date the degree was conferred.

H. Meeting Degree Requirements

Specific deadlines for the various requirements for graduate degrees are outlined in the Graduate School Web site (see http://www.gradschool.purdue.edu/gradrequirements/index.cfm) and must be met as specified. All degree requirements for undergraduate and professional degrees are to be met as of the end of the academic session in which the degree is to be conferred. In the event that academic requirements for an undergraduate or professional degree have not been met as of the end of the session, the candidate’s school may grant an extension of time, not to exceed 30 calendar days following the end of the session, for these requirements to be completed in order for the degree to be conferred for that session. Academic requirements that have not been completed, as of the end of the 30-day period, shall disqualify the student from receiving the degree in the intended session and shall delay the conferring of the degree until the end of the next session in which the student is duly registered and all degree requirements have been completed.

Graduation rates for the West Lafayette Campus are available from the Office of the Registrar, Purdue University, 1095 Hovde Hall, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1095, (765) 494-8581. These rates are calculated and made available as required by the Student Right-to-Know and Campus Security Act.


Registration and Course Assignment

A. Registration

Students shall register during a prescribed period prior to the beginning of each semester or session. Registration for courses shall be accomplished in accordance with the procedures prescribed by the registrar. Late registrations will be accepted for one week after the beginning of classes in a regular semester and three days after the beginning of classes in a summer session. After the beginning of any session a late registrant shall be assessed an additional late registration fee (University Senate Document 73-6, January 28, 1974).

B. Immunization Requirements

Effective August 1995, Indiana state law requires all newly enrolled, full-time students attending residential campuses of Indiana public universities to be immunized against rubeola (10-day measles), rubella (German measles), mumps, diphtheria, and tetanus. This law requires the University to block the enrollment of any student who does not comply with immunization requirements.

  1. Evidence of immunization or immunity may be documented by completion of the Purdue Health History Form and signed by a healthcare provider. Other immunization records acceptable to the Indiana State Department of Health also may be used to document compliance with the immunization requirements. These include (1) a physician’s certificate, (2) immunization records forwarded by another school, (3) a record maintained by the student or parent showing the month and year during which each dose of vaccine was administered.

  2. Requests for exemption to these requirements based on medical or religious grounds must be accompanied by written documentation. Medically based requests must be signed by a healthcare provider; requests based on religious convictions must be signed by the student and submitted to the Purdue Student Health Center.

  3. Exemptions for medical reasons may be granted upon receipt of a written statement from a healthcare provider:

    1. Indicating the nature and duration of a medical condition that contraindicates an immunization, along with the specific vaccine identified as detrimental to the student’s health.

    2. Certifying pregnancy or suspected pregnancy.

    3. Verifying that the student is currently completing the course of all required immunizations.

  4. In the event of an outbreak of any of the vaccine preventable diseases covered by this law on or near campus, students holding exemptions will be excluded from all campus activities for their protection until the outbreak is declared to be over.

  5. Medical exemptions expire when the medical condition(s) contraindicating immunization change in a manner that permits immunization.

C. Allowable Academic Load

A student’s academic load shall be arranged, so far as possible, in accordance with the following policy:

  1. Credit hours in excess of 18 hours during a regular session shall be carefully monitored by the academic advisor, who may wish to consult with appropriate University personnel concerning the student’s prognosis for success. Unless the student’s curriculum requirement for that session is specified as greater than 18 credit hours, approval by the dean of his/her school or the dean’s designee must be obtained before the student may be assigned more than 18 credit hours.

  2. In summer session, a student may not be assigned to more than nine credit hours without approval by the dean of his/her school or the dean’s designee (University Senate Document 83-5, as amended and approved January 23, 1984).

D. Assignment to Intensive Courses

No person shall be permitted to register in two intensive courses in the summer session at the same time. In general, no one who is taking an intensive course shall be permitted to take another nonintensive course at the same time except, in special cases, with the approval of the instructor in the intensive course, the head of the department administering the intensive course, and, for graduate students, the dean of the Graduate School.

E. Assignment to a Dependent Course

(University Senate Document 83-7, March 26, 1984)

A student who received a grade of F, N, or U in any course shall not be admitted to any dependent course (one requiring the failed course as a prerequisite as set forth in the catalog), and any assignment to or enrollment in such dependent course shall be cancelled. Enrollment in a dependent course also may be cancelled if the student has not taken the prerequisite course or otherwise satisfied the stated requirements for enrolling in the course.

A student who received a grade of E, I, PI, or SI in any course may be admitted to a dependent course on trial with the approval of the head of the department administering the course. A transfer student deficient in prerequisite courses also may be admitted to a dependent course on trial with the approval of the department head. If any student on trial is reported delinquent, the student’s assignment to the course may be cancelled upon the recommendation of the instructor and with the concurrence of the department head.

If a student on trial in a dependent course completes the course with a passing grade, his/her achievement may, by prior agreement, be construed as satisfying the requirements for changing an E grade in any prerequisite course in the same department, provided the department head approves and reports the change of grade properly to the registrar. However, satisfactory work in a dependent course shall not relieve the student of the requirement to complete required work in any prerequisite course in which a grade of I, PI, or SI (incomplete) was received. None of these provisions shall deprive a student of the opportunity to resolve a grade of E, I, PI, or SI in the normal manner. (See Academic Regulations and Procedures: Grades and Grade Reports, sections E and F.)

F. Schedule Revisions

(Applies to West Lafayette and North Central campuses only. University Senate Document 81-10, February 15, 1982, and University Senate Documents 83-7, March 26, 1984, and 83-8, March 26, 1984)

Schedule revisions may occur following the beginning of a semester or session and are governed by policies intended to be uniformly administered across the various schools of the University. Students may revise their schedule in accordance with the following policy:

  1. Course Additions, Change of Level, or Change of Pass/Not-Pass Option. A student may add a course, change course level, or change the pass/not-pass option during the first four weeks of a semester or the first two weeks of a summer session by obtaining on the schedule revision form the signatures of the academic advisor and the instructor of the course to be added or changed, if in their judgments the student could satisfactorily fulfill the course objectives.

In the case of extenuating circumstances, course changes may be made during weeks five through nine of a semester or during weeks three through four and one-half of a summer session, upon recommendation of the student’s academic advisor, instructor, and head of the department in which the course is listed. Such course changes shall not be made during the last seven weeks of a semester or three and one-half weeks of a summer session.

Week   

 Restrictions

1

No approval required

2-4

Approval of academic advisor and instructor

5-9

Extenuating circumstances only. Approval of academic advisor, instructor, and head of the department in which the course is listed.

10-16

Not permitted

  1. Cancellation of Assignment. Students shall receive a grade for every course in which they are assigned unless the course assignment has been properly cancelled at the registrar’s office upon presentation by the student of a request approved by the academic advisor. If there are extenuating circumstances, these must be stated on the request.

When a course assignment is cancelled prior to the end of two weeks of a semester or one week of a summer session, the course will not be recorded on the student’s record. When a course assignment is cancelled after two weeks and prior to the end of four weeks of a semester or after one week and prior to the end of two weeks of a summer session, a grade of W shall be recorded.

After four weeks and prior to the end of nine weeks of a semester or after two weeks and prior to the end of four and one-half weeks of a summer session, a course assignment may be cancelled upon the request of the student with the approval of the academic advisor. The instructor shall indicate whether the student is passing or failing (see Academic Procedures and Regulations: Grades and Grade Reports, section D). If the student is not passing, the case may be referred by either the student or the instructor to the dean of students, who, after consultations with the dean or the designee of the student’s school and other appropriate University agencies, shall determine whether there are sufficient extenuating circumstances beyond the student’s reasonable control to justify the cancellation of the course assignment without a failing grade.

No course assignment shall be cancelled within the last seven weeks of any semester or three and one-half weeks of a summer session. The cancellation of all course assignments constitutes withdrawal from the University. Cancellation of all course assignments as a result of withdrawal shall be treated and recorded in the same manner as the cancellation of a single course assignment with the additional provision that the dean of students shall determine and assign the appropriate effective date to the withdrawal.

Week 

 Restrictions

1-2

No approval required, course will not be recorded.

3-4

Approval of academic advisor; course will be recorded with grade of W.

5-9

Approval of academic advisor. The instructor shall indicate whether the student is passing or failing (University Senate Document 91-5, February 24, 1992). A grade of W, WF, WN, or WU will be recorded. In case of a W, WF, WN, or WU, exceptions shall be determined by the dean of students. This restriction includes weeks 5-12 at the North Central Campus (University Senate Document 93-14, September 26, 1994). Undergraduate students with a semester classification of 0 and fewer than 31 hours of college credit, or with a semester classification of 1 or 2, need not have the instructor’s signature. Grades recorded for these students will be W (University Senate Document 91-5, February 24, 1992).

10-16

Course assignments cannot be cancelled during this period.

  1. Exceptions. Exceptions to the preceding regulations for registration, schedule revision, and cancellation of assignment may be made for courses that do not span the regular semester or summer session.

G. Withdrawal from the University

A student who withdraws, except for Military withdrawal, see section I, from the University during any semester or summer session shall secure an authorization from the dean of students, who shall present it to the registrar for proper entry upon the record. Each course on the student’s schedule will be cancelled or withdrawn by the registrar in accordance with regulations governing drop or withdraw of courses. When a student withdraws from the University, the registrar will issue authorization for refunds in accordance with the existing policy regarding such refunds.

H. Refunding of Fees and Tuition

(Board of Trustees minutes, December 7, 1950, and October 23, 1963)

Registered students who find it necessary to cancel their registration prior to the beginning of classes, upon the recommendation of the registrar, will receive a 100 percent refund of all fees and tuition.

Students who withdraw during the first six weeks of a semester, with the recommendation of the registrar, will receive a partial refund of the general service fee and tuition. More specifically, the percentage of refund is determined as follows:

  1. Fall or spring semester

    1. Withdrawal during the first or second week - 80 percent refund

    2. Withdrawal during the third or fourth week - 60 percent refund

    3. Withdrawal during the fifth or sixth week - 40 percent refund.

  2. Summer modules

    Refunds for summer modules are proportionate on the same basis as semester refunds.

    No portion of the health, student activity, recreation facilities, or academic building facilities fees will be refunded on or after the beginning of classes.

    For first-time students to Purdue University with Title IV Aid, and once classes begin, refunds are prorated based on the date of withdrawal from class(es). Refunds are calculated on all fees and tuition based on a diminishing scale. The refund period is through week 10 of the fall and spring semesters and through week five for an eight-week summer module. An administrative fee of $100 or five percent of tuition, fees, room, board, and other charges, whichever is less, will be deducted. Questions should be addressed to the Bursar’s Office.

I. Granting Academic Credit to Students Who Withdraw from the University upon Order of Induction into Military Service

  1. Seniors who are candidates for degrees during any semester will receive full credit after the completion of eight or more weeks provided the grades are passing at the time of withdrawal. There will be no refund of fees in such cases.

  2. No credit will be granted to a student who withdraws during the first five weeks of any semester. After the end of the fifth week, academic credit will be granted according to the following plan, with the understanding that the student concerned has a passing grade or better in those courses in which academic credit is desired. When the grade is not passing, a W will be entered in his/her record. Fractions of credit other than those specified below will be adjusted to the nearest specified fraction. In no case will credit for less than one-third of an hour be recorded.

Time of Withdrawal    
Semester Summer Session Proportion of Total Credits in Each Course
6th and 7th weeks 4th week 1/3
8th and 9th weeks 5th week 1/2
10th, 11th, and 12th weeks 6th and 7th weeks 2/3
After 12th week 8th week Full credit

Classes

A. Attendance

(University Senate Document 6-5, March 19, 2007; University Senate Document 10-6, March 21, 2011; University Senate Document 10-8, March 21, 2011; University Senate Document 13-4, March 24, 2014; and University Senate Document 19-14, February 17, 2020)

The resources of Purdue University are provided for the intellectual development of its students. Courses with defined schedules are provided to facilitate an orderly and predictable environment for learning, as well as to provide assurance of a registered student’s right to access the course. Scheduled courses allow students to avoid conflicts and reflect the University’s expectation that students should be present for every meeting of a class/laboratory for which they are registered. Faculty are responsible for organizing and delivering a course of instruction and for certifying student accomplishment on the basis of performance. Coursework is defined as the assessment(s) used by the instructor to determine the student’s grade, as outlined in the course syllabus.

The University recognizes that the learning mission can be enhanced significantly by co-curricular experiences. Students participating in University-sponsored activities should be permitted to make up class work missed as a result of this participation. Ultimately students are responsible for all required coursework and bear full responsibility for any academic consequences that may result due to absence.

Additionally, the University recognizes that in some circumstances, absence from class is unavoidable or is necessary to fulfill a required obligation. As such, the University has established the following as reasons to be granted an excused absence from class:
  • Grief/Bereavement
  • Military Service
  • Jury Duty
  • Parenting Leave
Procedures and remedies for granting these absences for is specified in the sections below. The student bears the responsibility of informing the instructor in a timely fashion, if possible. The instructor bears the responsibility of trying to accommodate the student either by excusing the student or allowing the student to make up work, when possible.

1. General Attendance Issues

Instructors are expected to establish and clearly communicate in the course syllabus attendance policies relevant to individual courses. Course attendance policies must be consistent with University policy. It is recognized that occasionally it may be necessary for students to be absent from a scheduled course activity for personal reasons beyond their control. The University expects each student to be responsible for class-related work missed as a result of an unavoidable absence; this work may be made up at the discretion of the instructor.

Only the instructor can excuse a student from a course requirement or responsibility. When conflicts or absences can be anticipated, such as for many University sponsored activities or religious observances, the student should inform the instructor of the situation as far in advance as possible and the instructor should strive to accommodate the student. Individual course policies may state expected notification periods. Additionally, instructors must clearly and explicitly state, in their course syllabus, procedures in which assignments and assessments can be made up. For unanticipated or emergency absences where advance notification to an instructor is not possible, the student should contact the instructor as soon as possible by e-mail, phone, or by contacting the main office of the department that offers the course. When the student is unable to make direct contact with the instructor and is unable to leave word with the instructor’s department because of circumstances beyond the student’s control, the student or the student’s representative should contact the Office of the Dean of Students. A member of the Dean of Students staff will notify the student’s instructor(s) of the circumstances. The student should be aware that this intervention does not change the outcome of the instructor’s decision regarding the students’ academic work and performance in any given course.

2. Conflicts with Religious Observances

The University values a community with diverse backgrounds and traditions and recognizes that conflicts between regularly scheduled curricular activities and religious observances of some members of our community can arise. Instructors are required to cooperate with students in dealing with course work missed due to absences resulting from participation in religious observances.

Students requesting special consideration in scheduling are encouraged to make this known to instructors well in advance, minimize the length of the absence, and be flexible in arranging alternative times to complete any assignments they might miss.

3. University Excused Absences

The University Senate recognizes the following as types of absences that must be excused:

  • Absences related to those covered under the Grief Absence Policy for Students (GAPS)
  • Absences related to those covered under the Military Absence Policy for Students (MAPS)
  • Absences related to those covered under Jury Duty Policy for Students
  • Absences related to those covered under the Parenting Leave Policy for Students

These policies apply to all students currently enrolled on the Purdue University West Lafayette campus and State-Wide Purdue University locations.

4. Grief Absence Policy for Students (GAPS)

Students will be excused with no penalty to a student’s attendance and the student will be given the opportunity to make up coursework as defined in the course syllabus for bereavement leave. This also includes being granted leave even in those incidences where a student does not travel from campus.

The following parameters are established related to the relationship to the student of the deceased loved one.

Immediate Family: Students are eligible for up to five (5) days of excused absence, over a two-week period, of the semester in which the death occurs, for the death of a spouse, parent, child, grandparent, grandchild or sibling, or a corresponding in-law or step-relative.

Other Relationships: Students are eligible for up to three (3) days of excused absence, over a two-week period, of the semester in which the death occurs, for the death of relatives or friends falling outside of the category of immediate family.

In unique circumstances, a bereaved student should petition for extended grief absence through the Office of the Dean of Students (ODOS) by meeting individually with an ODOS staff member for case evaluation.

In addition, students may be granted additional absences to account for travel considerations, to be determined by the distance of the verified bereavement services from West Lafayette, IN, as follows:

  • Within 150 mile radius of West Lafayette - no additional excused absence days
  • Between 150-300 mile radius of West Lafayette - one additional excused absence days
  • Beyond 300-mile radius of West Lafayette - two additional excused absence days
  • Outside the 48 contiguous United States - four additional excused absence days.
A student enrolled at other Purdue University locations shall be granted additional leave based upon the traveled distance from the State Wide location in which the student is enrolled.

A student should contact the ODOS to request that a notice of his or her leave be sent to instructors. The student will provide documentation of the death or funeral service attended to the ODOS. Given proper documentation, the instructor will excuse the student from class and provide the opportunity to earn equivalent credit and to demonstrate evidence of meeting the learning outcomes for missed assignments or assessments.

In cases of impending death, students should contact the instructor as soon as possible by e-mail, phone, or by contacting the main office of the department that offers the course. When the student is unable to make direct contact with the instructor and is unable to leave word with the instructor’s department because of circumstances beyond the student’s control, the student or the student’s representative should contact the Office of the Dean of Students. A member of the Dean of Students staff will notify the student’s instructor(s) of the circumstances. Instructors should work to reasonably accommodate students in these unique circumstances.

5. Military Absence Policy for Students (MAPS)

Students will be excused, and no penalty will be applied to a student’s absence for mandatory military training and be given the opportunity to make up coursework as defined in the course syllabus.

It is the responsibility of the student to inform the instructor at the beginning of the semester of the potential for mandatory military training conflicts. Students should expect that absences from heavier course loads will be more difficult to recover from than absences from lighter course loads.

Students are eligible for up to fifteen (15) days for military-required absences per academic year with no more than ten (10) academic calendar (during the fall and spring semester) days taken consecutively, for their mandatory military training. Total absences, including travel, may not exceed 1/3 of the course meetings for any course.

Students may be granted additional absences to account for travel considerations, to be determined by the distance of the verified military training from the Purdue campus, as follows:
  •    Within 150-mile radius of West Lafayette - no additional excused absence days
  •    Between 150‐300 mile radius of West Lafayette - one additional excused absence days
  •    Beyond 300-mile radius of West Lafayette - two additional excused absence days
  •    Outside the 48 contiguous United States - four additional excused absence days
A student enrolled at other Purdue University locations shall be granted additional leave based upon the traveled distance from the State Wide location in which the student is enrolled.

A student should contact the Office of the Dean of Students (ODOS) to request that a notice of the leave be sent to instructors when informed of the dates of mandatory military training. The student will provide documentation of the mandatory military training in the form of orders or equivalent documents as proof of legitimate absence to the ODOS as soon as these documents are available. If necessary, the ODOS may consult with the Veterans Success Center about the nature of the documentation. When documentation is presented to the Office of the Dean of Students, a verified absence notification will be sent to the student’s instructors.

The student may provide verbal information about the leave to the ODOS and an unverified preliminary (non-MAPS) notice will be sent to instructors for planning purposes only. MAPS will be applicable only when the student has returned to the ODOS with substantiating documentation and ODOS has sent a verified absence notification to the instructors.

With a verified absence notification from the ODOS, no penalty will be applied to a student’s absence for mandatory military training and the student will be given the opportunity to make up course work as defined in the course syllabus.

Unique or variant exceptions should be dealt with in a negotiated manner between the student and professor, which may include involving the Department Head, Dean of the school or college, ODOS, or the Veterans Success Center to review and consult on his or her situation.

In certain laboratory-based or intensive short-term courses, a student can jeopardize his/her academic status with an unreasonable number of absences, particularly in lab courses that cannot be made up later. In courses with extensive laboratory exercises, group projects, group performances, or participation requirements, equivalent exercises or assessments may not be possible as determined by the instructor and subject to review by the Dean of the school or college offering the course, or their designee. In such a case the student may be eligible for retroactive withdrawal. The student should always consult with the instructor to determine the potential impact of any absence.

6. Jury Duty Absence Policy For Students

Students will be excused, and no penalty will be applied to a student’s absence for Jury Duty and given the opportunity to make up course work as defined in the syllabus in the event that a student is summoned to serve as a potential juror and/or who have been empaneled as a juror in a criminal and/or civil trial. It is the responsibility of the student to inform the instructor at the earliest possible opportunity of the potential for jury duty conflicts. Students should expect that absences from heavier course loads will be more difficult to recover from than absences from lighter course loads.

Students are eligible for up to ten (10) days for jury duty required absences per academic semester. Total absences, including travel, may not exceed 1/3 of the total course meetings for any course.

Students may be granted additional absences to account for travel considerations, to be determined by the distance of the jury duty from the Purdue University campus as follows:

  •    Within 150-mile radius of West Lafayette - no additional excused absence days
  •    Between 150‐300 mile radius of West Lafayette - one additional excused absence days
  •    Beyond 300-mile radius of West Lafayette - two additional excused absence days
  •    Outside the 48 contiguous United States - four additional excused absence days
A student enrolled at other Purdue University locations shall be granted additional leave based upon the traveled distance from the State Wide location in which the student is enrolled.

A student should contact the Office of the Dean of Students (ODOS) to request that a notice of the leave be sent to instructors as soon as the student is aware of the dates of the summoned jury duty. The student will provide documentation of the jury duty in the form of a court summons.

With a verified absence notification from the ODOS, the instructor will not penalize the student for missing class and will provide the opportunity to earn equivalent credit and to demonstrate evidence of meeting the learning outcomes for missed assignments or assessments.

Unique jury duty situations (sequestered, empaneled as a Grand Jury member, etc.) should be dealt with in a negotiated manner between the student and professor, which may include involving the Department Head, Dean of the school or college, or ODOS, to review and consult on the student’s situation.

In certain laboratory-based or intensive short-term courses, a student may jeopardize their academic status with an unreasonable number of absences, particularly in lab courses that cannot be made up later. In courses with extensive laboratory exercises, group projects, group performances, or participation requirements, equivalent exercises or assessments may not be possible as determined by the instructor and subject to review by the Dean of the school or college offering the course, or their designee. In such a case the student may be eligible for retroactive withdrawal. The student should always consult with the instructor to determine the potential impact of any absence.

7. Parenting Leave Policy for Students

Students who are pregnant, have recently given birth, or need a leave of absence to care for a newborn, adopted, legal guardian, or foster care, may petition for a leave of absence though the Office of Institutional Equity (OIE) by meeting individually with an OIE staff member. The student will be expected to provide documentation related to the petition for leave. If approved, the student will be excused, and no penalty will be applied to a student’s absence and given the opportunity to make up course work as defined in the syllabus. The student will be excused from classes. The University will approve all absences due to pregnancy or childbirth for as long as a student’s medical provider states that it is medically necessary, and may approve other absences as appropriate.

The University will provide students who are pregnant or have recently given birth with the same special services it provides to students with temporary medical conditions.

The instructor will not penalize the student for missing class during an approved absence and will provide opportunity to earn equivalent credit and to demonstrate evidence of meeting the learning outcomes for missed assignments and assessments.

8. Procedures

The instructor will not penalize the student for missing class during an approved absence and will provide opportunity to earn equivalent credit and to demonstrate evidence of meeting the learning outcomes for missed assignments and assessments.

Students requesting excused absences or leaves under the above policies should expect that absences from heavier course loads or those in certain laboratory-based or intensive short-term courses will have a greater impact on a student then those with a lighter course load. In courses with extensive laboratory exercises, group projects, group performances, or participation requirements, make up coursework may not be possible as determined by the instructor and subject to review by the Dean of the school or college offering the course, or their designee. In such a case the student may be eligible for retroactive withdrawal. The student is advised to always consult with the instructor to determine the potential impact of any absence.

Students who have received an approved leave of absence will be permitted to return to the same academic and extracurricular status as before the absences began. Additionally, students who have had an approved leave of absence will maintain their fellowship and scholarship status for all Purdue University-administered fellowships and scholarships.

Students who believe that they have not been provided an excused absence(s) or the opportunity to complete make up work are encouraged to attempt to resolve the matter informally with the instructor, and department head and Dean of the College or School that the course is offered. Additionally, the ODOS, or the OIE in cases involving the Parenting Leave policy, may be consulted by the student for further review of their case. In a case where grades are negatively affected, the student may follow the established grade appeals process.

9. Conclusion

The University expects that students will attend classes for which they are registered. At times, however, either anticipated or unanticipated absences can occur. The student bears the responsibility of informing the instructor in a timely fashion, when possible. The instructor bears the responsibility of trying to accommodate the student either by excusing the student or allowing the student to make up work, when possible. The University expects both students and their instructors to approach problems with class attendance in a manner that is reasonable.

B. Auditor

(University Senate Document 10-5, February 21, 2011)

A person who is already enrolled as a student in the University and who wishes to attend a course in the University without credit shall obtain from the Office of the Registrar an Audit Permission form stating his/her name, their PUID, the subject, course, and CRN number, the number of credits, and the term. This form needs to be signed by the instructor of record for the course. A person who is not already enrolled as a student must apply for admission as a non-degree student with the Office of Admissions. Once accepted, he/she may follow the steps outlined above.

A person who has status in the University by reason of admission to, and registration in, a definite classification may enroll in a course as an auditor. The assignment and enrollment must be completed by the regular procedure for registration. The assessment of fees and determination of allowable load shall be in accordance with the credit value or equivalent of the course(s) involved.

For a staff member, the registrar will also require the approval of the staff member’s immediate supervisor. The fee for auditing shall be waived for persons who are eligible for fee remission.

Members of the staff who, as part of the regular duties for which they are paid, are required to attend course(s) in their own department without credit shall be exempt from the above provisions requiring a special permit for registration and approval of the dean of the Graduate School acting for the president.

An auditor in a course shall be entitled to hear lectures, recitations, and oral quizzes. He/She shall not participate in classroom exercises except as invited by the instructor. He/She shall neither submit papers, when tests or examinations are given, nor take part in laboratory work. An auditor shall receive no credit for the course.

  C. Athletic Affairs Committee Missed Class Time Policy (website)


Financial Obligations and Responsibilities

Students should make every effort to keep their credit good in the community for their own benefit and that of all students.

A student’s failure to pay the University amounts owed by established due dates may result in default interest charges and late fees and imposition of holds preventing access to student services such as registration, delivery of transcripts or diplomas (See Scholastic Records, Holds, in Section D). You understand and accept that if you fail to pay your student account bill or any monies due and owing to the University by the scheduled due date, and fail to make acceptable payment arrangements to bring your account current, the University may refer your delinquent account to a collection agency and incur additional collection costs and fees. As provided in Indiana Code Section 21-14-2-11, you further understand and agree that you are responsible for paying collection agency fees which may be assessed based on a percentage not to exceed thirty three and one third percent (33.3%) for domestic collections or up to fifty percent (50%) of the balance in cases of litigation. Court costs and attorney fees may also be assessed. Collection fees outside of the United States may range up to 54%. The fifteen percent (15%) charge under Indiana Code § 6-8.1-9.5-10 associated with collection of indebtedness by means of the Indiana state tax set off program (which allows a state agency to apply for setoff against a debtor’s state tax refund) shall be included in the indebtedness. Any judgment entered shall be without relief from valuation and appraisement laws. The parties agree that the exclusive jurisdiction and venue for any dispute resolution brought under this agreement shall be the courts of Tippecanoe County, Indiana, except as pre-empted by or prohibited by 15 USC § 1692i, as hereinafter amended from time to time, other federal statutes, or state laws and regulations, including consumer protection laws but excluding general preferred venue laws. All returned checks, drafts or orders are subject to a service charge not exceeding the maximum allowed by Indiana law. Finally, you understand that your delinquent account may be reported to one or more of the national credit reporting agencies. You authorize the University and its employees, agents, representatives, attorneys, vendors and contractors (including collection agencies) to contact you on a current or future land line telephone and/or cellular telephone number(s), and via e-mail; and to use automated telephone dialing equipment, artificial or pre-recorded voice or text messages, for the purpose of collection of your financial obligations or to receive general information from the University. You agree to keep the University informed and updated in the event of a change in your cellular telephone number, home or business telephone number, mailing address or email address.

Students with past due financial obligations to the University may have their official university records placed on hold, including placement of a hold on registration eligibility for any future academic terms. (See Scholastic Records, Holds, in Section D.) Degree candidates with delinquent financial obligations to the University must pay or satisfy such debts at least one week before the close of any term. If any such debts have not been paid or satisfied upon terms acceptable to the University before the close of any term, a candidate’s diploma may be withheld from graduation ceremonies, or if the degree is granted without knowledge of such delinquency, the diploma and transcript will be held until the financial obligation has been satisfied.


Grades and Grade Reports

The policy changes approved at the April 15, 2013 Senate meeting shall apply solely to the West Lafayette campus.

A. Basis of Grades

Each student shall be responsible for the completion of all required work, in each course for which he/she has enrolled, by the time of the last scheduled meeting of the class, unless his/her assignment to the course has been properly withdrawn. Each student shall receive from his/her instructors a grade in each course for which he/she is enrolled at the close of the session. This grade shall indicate the student’s achievement with respect to the objectives of the course.

B. Semester Grades

(University Senate Document 76-7, as amended and approved, February 21, 1977, and University Senate Document 96-8, April 28, 1997.)
 
The following grades shall be available to be assigned by the instructors and reported when they are called for by the registrar:
 
1. For Credit Courses

A+, A: Highest passing grade.
A-
B+
B
B-
C+
C
C-
D+
D
D-: Lowest passing grade; marginally passing minimal objectives of the course.
E: Conditional failure; failure to achieve minimum objectives, but only to such limited extent that credit can be obtained by examination or otherwise without repeating the entire course. This grade represents failure in the course unless and until the record is duly changed within one semester. It cannot be improved to a grade higher than D. (See section E.) When an instructor reports a grade of E, he/she shall file in the departmental office a statement of what is required of the student to receive the passing grade.
F: Failure; failure to achieve minimal objectives of the course. The student must repeat the course satisfactorily in order to establish credit in it.

2. For Credit Courses Taken under Pass/Not-Pass Option P: Passing grade; equivalent to grade A+, A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C or C-. N: Not passing.

3. For Zero Credit Courses (including thesis research but not including laboratory portions of courses in which, for purposes of scheduling, separate course designations are used for the laboratory section).

S: Satisfactory; meets course objectives.
U: Unsatisfactory; does not meet course objectives.
AU: Audit Grade; does not meet degree objectives.
NS: Not Submitted; assigned when a grade is not submitted by the instructor.

4.  For Incomplete Work, (University Senate Document 83-8, March 26, 1984; revised by University Senate Document 97-7, April 27, 1998, and University Senate Document 00-5, March 19, 2001)

A grade of incomplete is a record of work that was interrupted by unavoidable absence or other causes beyond a student’s control, which work was passing at the time it was interrupted and the completion of which does not require the student to repeat the course in order to obtain credit. The incomplete grade is not to be used as a substitute for a failing grade. The incomplete may also be used to delay the awarding of a grade in courses (e.g., self-paced courses, mastery courses, and practicums) the completion of which normally requires one semester, but the structure of which allows specified additional time. An instructor may consult with the dean of students to determine whether the circumstances may warrant a grade of incomplete. When an instructor reports a grade of incomplete, he/she shall file in the departmental office registrar’s form 60 stating the reasons for the grade and what is required of the student to achieve a permanent grade. The instructor shall also indicate the grade the student has earned on the work completed, and the weight to be given to the remainder of the work in computing a final, permanent grade. The student must achieve a permanent grade in the course no later than one year after the incomplete is given, or the incomplete grade will revert to a failing grade. (See section F.)   A student will not be permitted to enroll in a course in a future semester for a course in which they have a current I, PI, or SI grade.

Appropriate incomplete grades for courses are as follows: I: Incomplete; no grade; the student was enrolled in a credit course under the regular grade option. PI: Incomplete; no grade; same as I except that the student was enrolled in a credit course under the pass/not-pass option. (See Section C.) SI: Incomplete; no grade; same as I except that the student was enrolled in a zero credit course.

C. Pass/Not-Pass Option

In order to provide students with the opportunity to broaden their educational foundations with minimum concern for grades, an alternative grading system, the pass/not-pass option, is established. Students will register for the pass/not-pass option in accordance with “Academic Regulations and Procedures: Registration and Course Assignment,” section A (University Senate Document 73-6, January 28, 1974).

  1. The option is open to all students in the University subject to the regulations of the school in which the student is enrolled. In particular, the school will specify under what conditions a course that is passed under this option may be used to satisfy its graduation requirements. A department or school may specify that certain courses intended only for students in that department or school are available only on the pass/not-pass option (University Senate Document 75-10, as amended and approved, April 19, 1976).

  2. Subject to the regulations of his/her school, a student may elect this option in any course that does not already appear on his/her academic record and in which he/she is otherwise eligible to enroll for credit with letter grade. A student may not elect this option for more than 20 percent of the total credit hours required for graduation.

  3. The registrar’s class roster will indicate which students have elected this option.

  4.  A student who is enrolled in a course under this option has the same obligations as those who are enrolled in the course for credit with letter grade. When the instructor reports final grades in the course, he/she will report that any such student who would have earned a grade of A+, A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, or C- has passed the course, and that any other such student has not passed. The registrar will make an appropriate notation on the student’s academic record in place of a letter grade, but will not use the course in computing GPA.

D. Directed Grades

(University Senate Document 83-8, March 26, 1984; amended by University Senate Document 01-3, November 19, 2001)

The registrar is directed to record the following grades and symbols under special circumstances in lieu of semester grades. The registrar may request from the faculty such information as he/she needs and on such forms as the registrar shall prescribe.

W: Withdrew; a record of the fact that a student was enrolled in a credit course and withdrew from the course after the withdrawal date per campus time-frame.

WF: Withdrew Failing; a record of the fact that a student with a classification of 3 or higher, was enrolled in a credit course and withdrew from the course after the fourth week at which time, according to a statement from the instructor, the student was not passing in his/her work. This grade does not affect GPA computations. A grade of WF may be directed by the Committee on Scholastic Delinquencies and Readmissions.

WN: Withdrew Not Passing; the same as WF for a credit course taken under the pass/not-pass option.

WU: Withdrew Unsatisfactory; the same as WF for a zero credit course.

IF: Unremoved Incomplete-Failing; for a credit course in which a student received an I grade, a directed record of the student’s failure to achieve a permanent grade before the end of one year after the Incomplete was given.  This grade counts in all respects as a failing grade.

IN: Unremoved Incomplete-Not Passing; for a credit course taken under the pass/not-pass option and in which the student received a PI grade. The same as an IF grade except that it does not affect GPA computations.

IU: Unremoved Incomplete-Unsatisfactory; for a zero credit course in which a student received an SI grade. The same as an IF grade except that it does not affect GPA computations.

E. Improvement of E Grade 

(University Senate Document 76-7, as amended and approved, February 21, 1977)

A student who receives a grade of E may request the opportunity to improve the grade provided that he/she can complete special requirements by the time he/she completes another semester enrollment. A student who successfully achieves all minimal objectives in the course will receive a grade of D. The value of the D grade shall replace the E grade in the computation of future GPAs. If the student fails to achieve within the specified time a D grade in any course for which he/she received a grade of E, it shall become the permanent grade and the registrar shall not thereafter honor a request to change that grade. However, on the recommendation of the head of the student’s school and the approval of the department head, the time for accomplishing this improvement may be extended. Certification of the improvement of an E grade to a D grade shall be reported on such forms as the registrar shall prescribe. The D grade shall be added to the permanent academic record and reported to the student no later than his/her next grade report.

F. Completion Grades

(University Senate Document 83-8, March 26, 1984, April 15, 2013)

A student who receives a grade of I, PI, or SI in a course and who successfully completes his/her work in the time interval specified by the instructor, but no later than one calendar year after the I grade was given, will receive from the instructor whatever permanent grade his/her work would have deserved if it had been completed on time regardless of the student’s enrollment status. The value of the final grade resulting from the late completion of the course requirements shall be incorporated in future cumulative GPAs. If the student fails to achieve within the specified time a permanent grade in any course for which he/she received a grade of I, PI, or SI, the registrar shall record a permanent grade of IF, IN, or IU for the grade of I, PI, or SI, respectively. The value of an IF grade shall be incorporated in future cumulative GPAs.

The registrar shall not honor a request to extend the time for completing the course requirements except when such a request is prompted by causes beyond the student’s control, and a documented explanation of the circumstances is submitted to the registrar along with the recommendation of the head of the student’s school and the approval of the department head.

Requests for the addition of a permanent grade to the record shall be submitted on such forms as the registrar shall prescribe regardless of the student’s enrollment status. Any addition of grade as provided in this section shall be entered on the student’s permanent academic record and be reported to the student.  (With myPurdue no reporting is needed as it’s automatically available to the student.)

G. Grade Corrections

An instructor who discovers that an erroneous grade was reported for a student shall immediately submit to the registrar a statement, countersigned by the department head, of what retroactive correction is to be made. A correction of grade should be reported to the registrar within 30 days after the start of the fall, spring or summer semester following the semester in which the erroneous grade was reported. Any correction reported after this time must be accompanied by the instructor’s explanation for the delay in reporting in addition to the approval of the department head, unless the grade change is the result of a grade appeal. When a grade correction is recorded, the appropriate semester and overall GPA will be corrected (University Senate Document 79-4, November 19, 1979).

H.  Mid-Term Grades

Between the beginning of the fifth week and the end of the seventh week, all students enrolled in 10000-29999 level and those approved for foundational courses shall be provided graded feedback by their faculty. These grades will not become part of the permanent record.

I.  Final Grade Report

A final report will be made by the instructor for each student enrolled in a given class in accordance with the conditions of the registration and following instructions issued by the registrar. The complete record will then be reported to the student, to the head of the school, and to such other designated parties as may be entitled to the report. 

J.  Scholastic Indexes 

(University Senate Document 76-7, as amended and approved, February 21, 1977; University Senate Document 84-10, March 25, 1985; University Senate Document 94-2, December 12, 1994; University Senate Document 7-5, April 21, 2008; and University Senate Document 12-6, April 15, 2013)

The scholastic standing of all undergraduate students enrolled in programs leading to a degree shall be determined by three scholastic grade point averages (GPAs). The semester GPA, the cumulative GPA, and the program GPA.

  1. The semester GPA is an average determined by weighting each grade received during a given academic semester by the number of semester hours of credit in the course.

  2. The cumulative GPA for an undergraduate student is a weighted average of all grades received as an undergraduate student. With the guidance of his/her academic advisor, a student may enroll in a non-repeatable course up to three times. In such cases, the same course* is to be used, the same grade mode and only the most recent grade received shall be included in the cumulative GPA. In the case of a course in which a conditional grade has been improved by examination, the most recent grade received shall be used.

* An equivalent course may be used when authorized by the faculty member in charge of said course. Transfer credits from other colleges and universities may be used to fulfill degree requirements, but cannot be used to remove Purdue recorded grades from GPA calculations.

  1. The program GPA is derived from a degree audit and will be used as a criterion to accept a student to a program during the process of Change of Degree Objective (CODO). The degree audit relevant to the  program to which a student transfers is used to determine the program grade point average. In a case where no courses of the initial program apply to the new program, the same criteria for acceptance to a program may be used as for a student applying out of high school.

  2. The cumulative GPA for a student enrolled in the professional curriculum in pharmacy is a weighted average of all grades received by the student while in the professional curriculum plus all grades included in the student’s undergraduate graduation GPA, as defined in section J-2 above, prior to entering the professional curriculum. All students shall be allowed to enroll in a non-repeatable course at most three times. In the case of such a repeated course* is to be used, the same grade mode and only the most recent grade received shall be included in the graduation GPA.

* An equivalent course may be used when authorized by the faculty member in charge of said course. Transfer credits from other colleges and universities may be used to fulfill degree requirements, but cannot be used to remove Purdue recorded grades from GPA calculations.

  1. The cumulative GPA for a graduate student is a weighted average of all grades received by the student in graduate-level courses (those numbered 500 or higher) since entering a graduate program, plus all grades received in undergraduate-level courses, taken while in the graduate program as part of the graduate plan of study. With the consent of his/her major professor, a student may repeat a course not intended for repeated registrations up to two attempts. In the case of such a repeated course, the same course* is to be used, the same grade mode and only the most recent grade received shall be included in the graduation GPA. Grades received in foreign language courses to establish reading knowledge as specified by the Graduate Council are not used in computing graduation indexes.

For the purpose of averaging, each grade shall be weighted in the following manner (University Senate Document 96-8, April 28, 1997).

Grade     Weight

A+, A:  4 x sem hrs = index pts

A-:       3.7 x sem hrs = index pts

B+:      3.3 x sem hrs = index pts

B:        3 x sem hrs = index pt

B-:       2.7 x sem hrs = index pts

C+:      2.3 x sem hrs = index pts

C:        2 x sem hrs = index pts

C-:      1.7 x sem hrs = index pts

D+:     1.3 x sem hrs = index pts

D:       1.0 x sem hrs = index pts

D-:      0.7 x sem hrs = index pts

E, F, IF: 0.0 x sem hrs = index pts

P, N, I, PI, SI, W, WF, WN, WU, IN, IU, AU, NS:  Not included

  1. The semester GPA is the sum of all index points for one semester for grades A+/A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-, E, IF, and F divided by the sum of all corresponding semester hours. This index is represented by the following formula:

S =    NA+NA+NA-+NB+NB … NF

4NA+4NA+3.7NA-+3.3NB+3NB … +0NF

  1. In the formula, NA+ , NA , NA- , NB+ , etc., are, respectively, the number of credit hours of A+, A, A-, B+, etc.

  2. The cumulative and program GPAs are computed similarly using the grades specified in sections J-2 and J-3 above. (University Senate Document 7-5, April 21, 2008)

  3. The registrar shall compile and report semester and cumulative GPAs after the close of each academic session.

K. Academic Renewal 

(University Senate Document 10-7, March 21, 2011)
Academic renewal is a recalculation of the Scholastic Indices.
  1. All Purdue University System graded courses that comprise the Academic Record prior to Re-entry or Readmission will receive zero credit, are not included in the credit hour total, and make zero contribution to the calculation of the Program GPA or the Cumulative GPA.

  2. The original course grade record will remain unchanged on the transcript.

  3. The Academic Renewal Policy shall be a Purdue University policy and be independent of the student’s School or College.

  4. Academic Renewal applies to students who have been admitted to the University under the current University Standards and Policies for Re-Entry or Readmission and have not been enrolled at Purdue University in the preceding five years.

  5. Students must petition the faculty Committee on Scholastic Delinquencies and Readmission (CSDR) to have their Scholastic Indices recalculated using the Academic Renewal Policy. This recalculation will not be implemented unless the student is in good standing according to University policy, and has completed at least 12 credit hours after Re-Entry or Readmission. The petition for recalculation of the Scholastic Indices must be made by students within one full year from the start of the semester in which they are readmitted or granted Re-Entry.

  6. Academic Renewal may only be granted once for a student.

  7. The faculty CSDR will administer the Academic Renewal Policy.


Academic Probation and Deficiency

(University Senate Document 13-11, April 21, 2014)

A. Academic Probation

  • A student at Purdue University shall be placed on academic probation if his/her fall or spring semester or cumulative GPA at the end of any fall or spring semester is less than a 2.0.
  • A student on academic probation shall be removed from that standing at the end of the first subsequent fall or spring semester in which he/she achieves semester and cumulative GPAs equal to or greater than 2.0.
  • Any grade change due to a reporting error will result in a recalculation of the GPA and determination of probation standing.
  • Academic standing will not be assessed in summer sessions.

B. Dropping of Students for Academic Deficiency

  • A student on academic probation shall be dropped from the University at the close of any fall or spring semester in which his/her semester and cumulative GPA is less than a 2.0.
  • Any grade change due to a reporting error will result in a recalculation of the GPA and determination of drop status.

C. Readmission

  • A student who is academically dropped from the University for the first time is not eligible to enroll for at least one fall or spring semester. A student who is academically dropped for the second time is not eligible to enroll for at least one year.
  • A student dropped by this rule must apply to the appropriate office or readmission committee for the Purdue campus of choice. A fee is assessed for processing the readmission application (Board of Trustees Minutes, June 5-6, 1970). Readmission is not guaranteed, but any student who gains readmission is readmitted on probation and is subject to stipulations in effect as a condition of readmission. (For more detailed information about readmission, visit the following web site: http://www.admissions.purdue.edu/readmission/)

Scholastic Recognition

A. Dean’s List

(University Senate Document, March 25, 1991)

At the conclusion of each semester, the registrar shall indicate which undergraduate students are scholastically eligible to be included on the Dean’s List. To be cited on the Dean’s List for any semester, one must:

  1. Have at least 12 hours included in the overall GPA.
  2. Have at least 6 hours included in the semester GPA.
  3. Attain at least a 3.5 overall GPA.
  4. Have at least a 3.0 current semester GPA.
B. Semester Honors

At the conclusion of each semester, the registrar shall indicate which undergraduate students are scholastically eligible for Semester Honors. To be cited one must:

  1. Have at least six credit hours included in the semester GPA.
  2. Attain at least a 3.5 semester GPA.
  3. Have at least a 2.0 overall GPA.
C. Graduation with Distinction

(University Senate Document 79-21, December 15, 1980)

  1. A candidate for the baccalaureate degree with distinction must have a minimum of 65 hours of credit earned at Purdue University included in the computation of the overall GPA. A candidate for an associate degree with distinction must have a minimum of 35 hours of credit earned at Purdue University included in the computation of the overall GPA.

  2. The minimum overall GPA for graduation with distinction in each school shall be no less than the 90th percentile of the graduation indexes of the graduates in each school, for the spring semester, provided that the index is at least 3.30. The minimum overall GPA so determined in the spring for each school shall be applied for graduation with distinction for the subsequent summer session and fall semester. In administering this rule, all baccalaureate engineering graduates will be considered as one school.

  3. Of those graduates who qualify for distinction under these rules for the spring semester, the three-tenths of the baccalaureate graduates having the highest overall GPA shall be designated as graduating with highest distinction, irrespective of the schools from which they graduate. The three-tenths of the spring associate degree graduates having the highest overall GPA will be designated as graduating with highest distinction.

    The minimum overall GPAs so determined for graduation with highest distinction shall be applied for graduation with highest distinction for the subsequent summer session and fall semester.

D. Professional Degree Programs

Students enrolled in professional degree programs also shall be eligible for the Dean’s List, Semester Honors, and Graduation with Distinction (Administrative Approval, April 27, 1998).

E. Achievement Credits

Students who fail to meet the criteria of scholastic distinction but who, in the judgment of one or more faculty members, merit citation for distinguished achievement, shall have their names presented through the heads of instructional departments or directly to the Committee on Superior Students, together with such evidence of achievement as is available. The criteria for selecting students in this group are:

  1. Original thinking of consistently good quality.

  2. Achievement of other than classwork; publication of literary, artistic, or scientific work.

  3. Work that requires great ingenuity or industry, but that may not lead to definite publication.

  4. Independent projects of reasonable magnitude carried out by the student on his/her own initiative.
    Projects carried out by such students may receive special achievement credit. Such achievement credits may be substituted for elective courses of instruction as determined in each case upon the recommendation of the dean of the school concerned.
F. Distinguished Military Graduates

Distinguished Military graduates of the Army and Air Force Reserve Officers’ Training Corps units will be designated by the appropriate department and the president each year upon graduation.


Scholastic Records

A. Good Standing

For purposes of reports and communications to other institutions or agencies, and in the absence of any further qualifications of the term, a student shall be considered in good standing unless he/she has been dismissed, suspended, or dropped from the University and not readmitted.

B. Transcripts

Any student or former student of the University whose record is not encumbered for any reasons described hereafter shall, upon written application to the registrar, be entitled to receive (1) a transcript of his/her complete record and/or (2) a certificate of completion. The registrar is authorized to issue such records upon the written request of the student or former student. The transcript shall consist of a full and complete copy of the student’s academic record.

C. The Certificate of Completion

The certificate of completion shall contain:

  1. the dates of attendance;
  2. a summary of the courses successfully completed; and
  3. a statement, “This is a summary of the courses successfully completed. An official transcript showing all courses taken may be obtained from the registrar, upon authorization by the student.”

The certificate of completion shall be issued only to students who have completed at least two semesters of resident work in the University. A certificate fee shall be charged for each copy of this certificate.

D. Encumbrance

A hold may be placed on a student’s official record:

  1. By the comptroller for nonpayment of fees, deposits, residence hall charges, or any other sums owed to the University.

  2. By the Business Office Student Organizations in the case of a responsible officer or officers of any student organization that has a delinquent account due to the University.

  3. By the dean of students for disciplinary reasons.

  4. By the director of the Student Health Center countersigned by the dean of students, for medical reasons. A degree candidate who is in arrears to the University may be denied his/her diploma until his/her financial record is cleared.

The request for the hold of a student’s record shall be filed with the Office of the Registrar and shall indicate whether either or both the registration of the student and/or the issuance of a transcript, certificate of completion, or diploma is to be held. When the record is thus held, no transcript or certificate of completion shall be issued. A hold shall remain until the registrar is notified to remove the hold by the officer responsible. It is the responsibility of the officer lifting the hold to immediately notify the registrar so as to clear the record of the student.

Students in arrears to the University shall not be recommended for degrees. The clearance of a student’s financial obligation on or before the Friday before commencement, or by a corresponding date in the first semester or in the summer session, shall be essential for graduation. If a student so delinquent clears his/her obligation later, his/her diploma may be released.

E. Record of Actions on Transcripts

(University Senate Document 15-8, March 21, 2016)

Disciplinary actions will not be recorded on transcripts unless disciplinary actions involve involuntary separation from the University (e.g., suspension and or expulsion), or degree revocation. In these instances, the following notations will be added to the transcript:

1. Suspension

The following statement will be added to the transcript while the suspension is in place. Once the suspension ends, regardless of whether or not the student returns to the University, the statement will no longer appear on the academic record.

“The student has been suspended until [insert date] due to violation of University regulations.”

2. Expulsion

The following statement will be added to the transcript and remain a permanent part of the transcript.

“The student was expelled due to violation of University regulations.”

3. Degree revocation

The following statement will be added to the transcript and remain a permanent part of the transcript.

“The individual’s degree has been revoked and this individual has been expelled due to violation of University regulations.”

F. Replacement of Diplomas

(Board of Trustees minutes, July 10, 1975)

A replacement diploma shall be issued to the original holder, upon his/her affidavit, certifying to the loss or damage of the original diploma and upon payment of the cost of reproducing the diploma in its original format.

G. Duplicate Diplomas

(University Senate Document 12-3, February 18, 2013)

A duplicate diploma shall be issued to the original holder of the diploma upon payment of the cost of reproducing the duplicate diploma. The duplicate diploma will be marked as “Duplicate,” in plain sight.


Scheduling of Examinations

Evening Examinations

(University Senate Document 77-27, approved September 25, 1978, and University Senate Document 82-5, approved February 21, 1983; revised by University Senate Document 00-4, March 19, 2001; and University Senate Document 7-6, February 18, 2008, and University Senate Document 14-2, February 16, 2015)

  1. The Office of the Registrar will schedule examinations as requested under the provisions of this policy. Such scheduling will be subject to limitations on available facilities and will be based on the concept of minimizing the number of students scheduled for more than one examination at the same time.

  2. Evening examinations will be scheduled when requested for multidivision courses whose daytime classrooms and schedule prohibit effective common examinations during regular class periods.

  3. Single-division course evening exams are not encouraged and may be requested only under the most unusual circumstances (e.g., space limitations preclude the establishment of valid examining environment) and after the personal review of the department heads.

  4. Graduate-level courses (60000 level) are exempted from this policy.

  5. Evening examinations may be scheduled during either of the following periods:

6:30 to 7:30 p.m.
8:00 to 9:00 p.m.

As an exception, when the Hall of Music, Loeb Playhouse, or Fowler Hall is used for two 60-minute examinations in a single evening, the examinations are to be scheduled for the following periods:

6:30 to 7:30 p.m.
8:30 to 9:30 p.m.

Start times in these locations will change to 6:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m. respectively on those occasions when they are scheduled for a 60-minute exam and an exam which exceeds 60 minutes. Requests for more than 60 minutes will be scheduled to start at the later hour.

In all cases, the testing period should be restricted to 60 minutes, unless a multiple-period evening examination has been requested. Requests for more than 60 minutes will be scheduled to start at the later hour.

  1. Multiple-period evening examinations may be requested only when the unique nature of the course as testified by the department head precludes effective testing within the regular 60-minute evening examination period.

  2. Examinations will be held on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday, with the exception that no examinations will be held on the day preceding an official University holiday.

  3. For all examination periods scheduled, roughly equivalent regular class periods are to be omitted. Omitted meetings are to be selected by the instructor according to the principle that meetings for each course should be distributed uniformly over its assigned term of instruction.

  4. Requests for the scheduling of evening examinations shall conform to the following procedures:

    1. Requests shall be forwarded to the Office of the Registrar by and with the approval of the departmental schedule deputy. The request should include a preferred date and two alternative dates (one of which should be in another week) for each evening exam requested.

      1. Multidivision courses at the 10000 and 20000 level must submit requests at the time departments submit their schedule of classes. A statement that these courses require evening examinations will be printed in the Schedule of Classes.

      2. If possible, all other courses requesting evening examinations should submit requests at the same time departments submit their schedule of classes. These courses will also be identified in the Schedule of Classes.

      3. If after the beginning of classes it becomes necessary to submit a request for an evening examination not previously scheduled, this request should be submitted at least four weeks prior to the proposed examination date. These requests will be honored only as space and the principle of conflict minimization permit.

      4. Scheduled times for evening examinations may be changed after the beginning of the semester providing a request for the change is submitted at least four weeks in advance of the earlier of the two scheduled dates. These requests will be honored only as space and the principle of conflict minimization permit. Changes in scheduled examinations should be avoided as much as possible. In particular, requests for changes in scheduled examinations in 10000- and 20000-level courses should be requested only under the most unusual circumstances.

    2. Examinations coincident with convocations, intercollegiate athletic events, and student activities will be avoided if possible; but if necessary, such examinations may be scheduled on the premise that the examination process takes priority over any of these events. In this case, the Office of the Registrar has the authority to start the first period of evening exams as early as 6:00 p.m.

    3. Conflicts shall be resolved as follows (University Senate Document 81-4, April 19, 1982; revised by University Senate Document 14-2, February 16, 2015):

      1. In case of examination conflicts (exams scheduled for the same student at the same time), similar to final examinations, students faced with a direct exam conflict are entitled to reschedule either examination.  It is the responsibility of the student to make the request for the necessary arrangements at least one week before the scheduled exam.  Course instructors shall not penalize a student who chooses to reschedule an examination under these options.  In the event the student is unable to reach an agreement with the course instructors to reschedule one of the exams, the student will contact the Office of the Registrar; the Registrar will make the final decision as to which exam is to be rescheduled and offered at an alternate time; the Registrar will communicate this decision to the course instructor and relevant department head.

      2. In case of examination conflicts with a scheduled evening course, the conflict should be resolved by the course instructors, provided that the student informs them of the conflict at least a week before the exam.  If the instructors cannot resolve the conflict, the scheduled evening course takes priority.  The examination instructor must offer an alternative time for their exam.

      3. Other conflicts should be resolved between the instructor and the student. Reasons for conflict should be taken under careful and reasonable consideration by the instructor and student.  If conflict resolution is not possible, the examination shall take precedence, subject to appeal through the head of the department in which the course is offered.

      4. The Office of the Dean of Students will be available for assistance in conflict resolution.

  5. The Office of the Provost shall implement a procedure to inform faculty and students of the academic regulations governing the scheduling and conducting of evening examinations.